Is a degree in Equine Science worth it? - Page 2
 
 

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Is a degree in Equine Science worth it?

This is a discussion on Is a degree in Equine Science worth it? within the Equine Careers and Education forums, part of the Horse Resources category
  • Equine careers, where to go for masters degree

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    02-12-2014, 12:31 PM
  #11
Green Broke
^Ugh, that's so unfortunate. ):
     
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    02-13-2014, 02:08 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZaneyZanne123    
I eventually got a degree in Biology (but who the heck needs a biologist?.............nobody).
Here in WY a bachelor's in Biology is pretty marketable.

Mines, other energy industries, and water testing labs all hire people with that degree and they pay pretty well.

Or, some kids I know who got a bachelor's in Biology then get an RN in nursing and, as they tell me, "can rule the world!" lol They get the better nursing jobs.

Other careers here that hire that are purebred cattle and horse outfits, some large farms, places that raise and sell pheasants or trout.

Zaney Zanne - you might need to hit the Rocky Mtn region!

But I agree that a degree in Business is more marketable than about any other.
     
    02-14-2014, 02:27 PM
  #13
Foal
In NC there are colleges and some horse barns that offer Equine Chiropractic classes for somewhere around $100 to $300 dollars. Not sure where your located but I would research it.
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    02-19-2014, 09:43 PM
  #14
Weanling
I will say though, I've personally seen people with degrees totally unrelated to a job with no experience beat out people with no degree and have experience.
     
    02-20-2014, 08:44 AM
  #15
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridgertrot    
I will say though, I've personally seen people with degrees totally unrelated to a job with no experience beat out people with no degree and have experience.
Absolutely true in the corporate world - many companies won't even interview someone who doesn't have a degree. They don't care what the degree is in, just that you took the initiative to pursue further education.
     
    02-23-2014, 08:47 AM
  #16
Weanling
As another holder of a worthless Equine degree please don't waste your time and money with it. No one in the horse world respects an equine degree and the colleges won't ever tell you that no one gets a job except maybe as a lowly stall cleaner/hot walker. (at less than minimum wage)
There are some good schools out there for Equine Massage, Dentistry and Chiropractic but you have to be careful to weed out the scams. To actually learn how to do it you should work as an apprentice under someone for a period of time. The massage therapy and chiropractic are very popular in my area, (personally I don't believe in it) but the ladies that do it own their own business, drive beautiful trucks, set their own hours and then go home and enjoy their own horses. Just bear in mind that the Dentistry part is plain old hard physical work-I've been amazed at how hard these dentists work watching them go through a barn and do 10 horses!
PS: in our state none of these professions require vet school, it must vary from state to state.
     
    02-26-2014, 02:15 PM
  #17
Yearling
It is mostly worthless.

The horse industry is tough. In a few years of stall mucking, horse training, getting stepped on, thrown off etc, you body just won't hold up. Then what do you do? Go back to school for a new career if you can afford it. Get a low paying job if you can't go back to school.

If you want to go into the nutrition field you might find jobs related to animal nutrition, but definitely plan on getting a master's degree.

I got a degree in equine science because I had almost $10,000 in scholarships which were only good towards an equine degree. Only now I may need to go back so I can change careers and get into something that pays better. I must point out that this covered 100% of my tuition so I don't have student loans.

The good news is my core classes are covered, and I took a lot of science classes so those should all transfer if I decide I want a second degree. They also offer accelerated master's (basically if you have a bachelor's degree but want to change careers, they give you an intensive program combining undergrad level classes with grad level classes so you get a Master's without starting over). Still it is very intensive!

Since you are just starting out you can also try doing a double major- just plan on going to school every summer session with no breaks!

I almost think high school students should take a year or two break before college and just work. Very few people go to school and get a job in what they majored in. My cousin's majored in Music- one is a supervisor at Starbucks, and the other works at a bank. Definitely not what they envisioned!

I am starting on an entirely new career path- I just have no clue what that path might be! Currently I am researching the job market in this area- I would rather not relocate.
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    02-26-2014, 03:22 PM
  #18
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4horses    
I almost think high school students should take a year or two break before college and just work.
I couldn't possibly disagree with this statement any more!

Most of those people who "take a few years off" before starting college never get around to going back. Finish school while you're still in the mindset of going to class everyday, and while all your high school learning is still fresh in your mind so you don't have to pay for non-credit-counting refresher courses in algebra or microeconomics. Once you start receiving a fulltime paycheck, you're not going to want to give it up to go back to school - even if going back to school could eventually result in a higher paycheck.
     
    02-26-2014, 09:10 PM
  #19
Yearling
Cynical- In some countries it is "normal" to take some time off before college to work/volunteer and get a better idea of what your interests are.

It certainly is better to take some time off before getting into a degree and then realizing that degree/career path is not for you. I've had several friends end up in that same situation- either starting over in a different degree, or ending up changing careers. This ends up costing them a lot of money in wasted tuition.

https://college.harvard.edu/admissio...ld-i-take-time
     
    02-26-2014, 09:33 PM
  #20
Started
There is an equine science program at my college. I've only seen the riding majors, but I'm not impressed with the riding and training techniques at all. You could learn just as much being a working student under a decent trainer.
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Tags
career advice, chiropractic, degree, equine science

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