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Age to jumpp??

This is a discussion on Age to jumpp?? within the Eventing forums, part of the English Riding category

     
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        05-29-2010, 11:04 PM
      #11
    Super Moderator
    Stallion inspections expect babies to free jump over quite large jumps. They don't break down for it at all. After the kuring, they go home to grow up before training over fences with a rider.

    This is a 2 year old sport pony stallion being tested over a small jump



    In eventing, it is legal to show 4 year olds to training level. I usually start horses over fences at 4 and have not had any problems with it.
         
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        05-30-2010, 12:10 PM
      #12
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
    Stallion inspections expect babies to free jump over quite large jumps. They don't break down for it at all. After the kuring, they go home to grow up before training over fences with a rider.

    This is a 2 year old sport pony stallion being tested over a small jump



    In eventing, it is legal to show 4 year olds to training level. I usually start horses over fences at 4 and have not had any problems with it.
    I'm with Allison here. However to start your horse at this age I personally would have made sure they were already doing work on the lunge since about 2.5 years of age, with little to no backing until they were 3 or so, and from there a good lunging schedule with an undersaddle ride 1-2 times a week. The crucial part is making sure they've got the muscle to bear a rider successfully. By successfully I mean they are consistent in their dressage work, well balanced with good self carriage. Only then would I start them over fences, and of course if they begin to show any strain in the slightest I would stop.

    Granted, every horse is different, and that's also a decided factor. Some horses will mature more quickly than others, and thus be ready for work over fences earlier (provided the earlier points are upheld). And then the horses that mature more slowly I would simply continue consistent lunge work and dressage until he or she is ready to move on.

    To note Allison's last point; the USEA has an entire series called the Young Event Horse series specifically for young horses age 3, 4, and 5. Many of these horses go on to compete very, very successfully at older ages.
         
        06-03-2010, 06:03 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Megannnn, what breed is your horse?

    That is something very important to consider when deciding about jumping a horse at a young age. Certain breeds and types don't mature until much later. I have a 5 1/2 year old draft pony that I won't be doing anything over 18" with until she's 7. Because drafts take longer to mature. And when she does jump it'll only be a few jumps here and there.

    My girl might be fully mature now and mostly like will be by the time she's 6, but I prefer to take it slow. It kills me to see people jumping horse 2', 2' 6", 3"+ on what I consider babies.

    Having owned a horse with joints in just about every part of his body destroyed by the age of 7 (he came that way, I was a naive buyer at that time)...well, I'm VERY careful.
         
        06-03-2010, 06:29 PM
      #14
    Green Broke
    Depends on the horse, depends on the rider, depends on the level of training, depends on fitness regime.

    A fit and strong horse that has excellent flatwork established can certainly be jumped successfully at 4 by a rider with a very good seat and forgiving hands.

    Your average horse that is ridden a few times a week, has only basic flatwork established and is ridden by an average rider will not be ready to be jumped at 4.

    I have no idea where you fit in this spectrum but there is my $0.02.
         
        06-04-2010, 01:32 AM
      #15
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by chestnutponies    
    megannnn, what breed is your horse?

    That is something very important to consider when deciding about jumping a horse at a young age. Certain breeds and types don't mature until much later. I have a 5 1/2 year old draft pony that I won't be doing anything over 18" with until she's 7. Because drafts take longer to mature. And when she does jump it'll only be a few jumps here and there.

    My girl might be fully mature now and mostly like will be by the time she's 6, but I prefer to take it slow. It kills me to see people jumping horse 2', 2' 6", 3"+ on what I consider babies.

    Having owned a horse with joints in just about every part of his body destroyed by the age of 7 (he came that way, I was a naive buyer at that time)...well, I'm VERY careful.
    He is a paint with quater horse lines. All of his family members for the most part were young reining, cutting, barrel racing and pleasure futurity winners. They all went on to lead very succesful long healthy lives. Which leads me to believe they mature on the earlier side.
         
        06-04-2010, 01:36 AM
      #16
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sarahver    
    Depends on the horse, depends on the rider, depends on the level of training, depends on fitness regime.

    A fit and strong horse that has excellent flatwork established can certainly be jumped successfully at 4 by a rider with a very good seat and forgiving hands.

    Your average horse that is ridden a few times a week, has only basic flatwork established and is ridden by an average rider will not be ready to be jumped at 4.

    I have no idea where you fit in this spectrum but there is my $0.02.
    well he is ridden 4-5 days a week and will soon be on 24/7 turnout to really make him fit. He is doing some serious dressage training. And I am going to start him on a fittening regime. Including trotting and cantering sets in the hilly fields next to my stables.
         
        06-04-2010, 07:36 PM
      #17
    Green Broke
    I said 'your average horse' in a general sense, I didn't mean to suggest that YOUR horse was average!! Just so you know...
         
        06-05-2010, 04:08 PM
      #18
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sarahver    
    I said 'your average horse' in a general sense, I didn't mean to suggest that YOUR horse was average!! Just so you know...
    i know. I didnt take it as you calling him average. I was just giving background to how his ancestors matured and stuff.
         

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