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Getting started in eventing, how did you do it?

This is a discussion on Getting started in eventing, how did you do it? within the Eventing forums, part of the English Riding category

     
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        11-27-2010, 06:07 PM
      #11
    Foal
    I did hunters for 5 years and when we moved I couldn't keep going to that barn. My hunters coach recommended a trainer closer to when I lived and she did primarily eventing herself so I got right into it.

    It is definitely important to find a trainer who is active in the eventing world. My trainer would saddle up her horse and we'd ride together most of the time- every jump I did she would do first. Every dressage test I did she would do first. It was great to not only be told what to do but be shown at the exact same time. Plus she was active herself in competing so she was familiar with other farms, other riders/trainers, judges, rules, etc.
         
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        11-27-2010, 06:12 PM
      #12
    Trained
    I think its important for your trainer to go to a lot of shows but they don't have to compete to know what their doing. My trainer doesn't own a single horse and doesn't ride regularly but he goes to comps all the time so he keeps up with the rules and changes. He used to compete a lot and rode grand prixs for awhile but I don't think you can coach as many people as he does and still ride at shows.
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        11-27-2010, 06:40 PM
      #13
    Trained
    Quote:
    but I don't think you can coach as many people as he does and still ride at shows.
    Hmm, maybe - but I don't think so. My Coach who competes 3*, has a very large barn of her own and has alot of Students from all around the area, plus gives clinics, and trains horses and competes...alot. Plus going to the O'connors to train herself.

    I guess it depends on the indavidual trainer and what their limitations are.

    Quote:
    It is definitely important to find a trainer who is active in the eventing world.
    I agree! Completely :)
         
        11-27-2010, 06:49 PM
      #14
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MIEventer    
    Hmm, maybe - but I don't think so. My Coach who competes 3*, has a very large barn of her own and has alot of Students from all around the area, plus gives clinics, and trains horses and competes...alot. Plus going to the O'connors to train herself.

    I guess it depends on the indavidual trainer and what their limitations are.



    I agree! Completely :)
    Thanks for dissing my trainer btw :(
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        11-27-2010, 07:05 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    She didn't diss your trainer. She just said it's possible to coach a lot of students and still compete actively...
         
        11-27-2010, 07:07 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    I'd say that while it's not "overly" important to have a coach actively competing, themselves, if you're just starting... but they must be actively taking clinics and lessons themselves.

    Eventing is a sport where if you try to "flub" your way through someone will get hurt... one of my biggest pet peeves is coaches who are coaching beyond their scope, well past their own ability. It's recipe for disaster.

    The other thing is, it does you no service to learn "wrong" then have to "fix" bad habits that weren't caught earlier as you get better. Best to just start with a coach with some solid achievements behind them... they need not be olympic medalists, but they should at least be competent and active in what they are teaching.
         
        11-29-2010, 01:31 AM
      #17
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gypsygirl    
    I think its important for your trainer to go to a lot of shows but they don't have to compete to know what their doing. My trainer doesn't own a single horse and doesn't ride regularly but he goes to comps all the time so he keeps up with the rules and changes. He used to compete a lot and rode grand prixs for awhile but I don't think you can coach as many people as he does and still ride at shows.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    my dressage instructor is the same. He has a full time job -get this - as a prison guard! Hahahah - and his mate has a grey he's training to take to the races as a stewert horse.
    My dressage couch comes to our comps and warms us up at the dressage arena and also goes as a judge. He's very active in the sport but doesn't compete and he did up to grand prix. Besides he has that many students horses to ride in lessons that he's got a good range :) and he puts up with me :)

    ETA - he also use to event
         
        11-29-2010, 07:33 AM
      #18
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Strange    
    She didn't diss your trainer. She just said it's possible to coach a lot of students and still compete actively...
    She said he had limitations..... He is a professional horse trainer who focuses on students and their horses. Just because he can't ride in shows anymore (he runs around all day helping and coaching) doesn't mean he isn't great at what he does..... I don't know if you meant it MIE but I am pretty offended...
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        11-29-2010, 09:06 AM
      #19
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gypsygirl    
    She said he had limitations..... He is a professional horse trainer who focuses on students and their horses. Just because he can't ride in shows anymore (he runs around all day helping and coaching) doesn't mean he isn't great at what he does..... I don't know if you meant it MIE but I am pretty offended...
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Reading for comprehension is valuable.

    Such as your comment...he has limitations, implying that his knowledge may be capped or his experience may limit him as you interperated it,

    HOWEVER as it was ORIGINALLY stated...individual trainer and what their limitations are.

    Can just as easily mean that they don't have the resources ( financial or time wise) to do what they may like. Could also be their area not allowing certain abilities ( like distances to shows).

    It is ALWAYS good to ask what the individual means before potentially making an error in interpretation and it is a good policy to follow.
         
        11-29-2010, 09:44 AM
      #20
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Spyder    
    It is ALWAYS good to ask what the individual means before potentially making an error in interpretation and it is a good policy to follow.
    Especially since you can't accurately discern someone's tone over the internet. :P

    Well, most of the time, heh.
         

    Tags
    beginner, eventing, kansas city, missouri

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