I have a bone to pick with Boyd Martin
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding > Eventing

I have a bone to pick with Boyd Martin

This is a discussion on I have a bone to pick with Boyd Martin within the Eventing forums, part of the English Riding category
  • People that have trained with boyd martin
  • What kind of trailer does boyd martin have

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-07-2010, 11:16 PM
  #1
Started
I have a bone to pick with Boyd Martin

Here's a snippet from his blog...

Quote:
"The decision to qualify for and compete at the WEG was financially crippling because I had to walk away from months of income and leave paying the bills to Silva, who’s been grinding away while I focused on training my horse. In hindsight I think the US Federation needs to come up with a financially supporting system for the riders that dedicate their lives to performing their best at these championships. They need to work out a system that supports the riders that are doing the business at the top level, horse after horse, year after year.

The Federation spends tens of thousands of dollars in funding riders that have never done a three-star in their lives, sending them on trips overseas accompanied by an entourage of coaches, managers and selectors, which adds up to a lot of money being funded toward Young Riders having their first crack at a high level event in another country. Instead the USEF could be supporting world-class events like Rebecca Farm, Jersey Fresh, Galway Downs and Fair Hill, which for me is ten minutes down the road. Remember that Neville Bardos, who was the highest-placed horse at the WEG is a product of the Fair Hill three-day event: he placed fourth there in 2007 and won in 2009.

I feel like the strong, proven riders desperately striving to bring glory to their country at the world championship level are neglected financially in their bid to be all they can be. In my opinion, the only combinations that should receive travelling grants are the ones capable of a top-ten finish in 4-star events. Anything else can be achieved here at home at the world class events we already have! We have to learn to be champions in our own back yard before we can take on the world".
So, now that he's got the red coat, it's okay to take funding away from up-and-coming riders, riders who will one day represent the USA at the highest levels of competition? He didn't have any trouble climbing the levels when he cozied up to Phillip Dutton with his average little horse.

So, he missed a month's worth of wages - by his choice! He's the one that wants to represent at the WEGs. If he wants to train hard, he should be prepared to take the brunt of his choice... not complain that the ULRs need MORE funding and the Jr/YR/AAs need less.

Phillip Dutton has people eating out of his hand, Boyd is at Phillip's farm... I think he's far better off than some of the people he's suggesting taking from.

Dispicable. I was never a HUGE fan, but now I'm no fan at all...
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    10-07-2010, 11:42 PM
  #2
Trained
He is so right though. Do you personally know anyone that has walked away from their business to go and train for an international championship?? I do, and he is right. What you need to understand is that they ARE team USA now, and probably will be for the next few years. We need to train these people so we have "masters" in the country that can bring up our "up and comers". With out excellent, very experienced trainers, how will we train our up and comers?? Send them to Europe, like we have been for centuries, I guess. And then have to shell out thousands of dollars getting them there, robbing our international riders and cycling the process. Again.

These people should not be punished for leaving their businesses, living out of thier horse trailers for 8 months to train for these events and going and winning. They should be supported. They seized an opportunity that they may not have again, by having an international level horse, at the right level and giving up months of income, taking on massive expenses just to represent their country.

I know I'm from a different discipline, but this issue plagues everyone on this continent. We need to develop trainers and masters before we can develop our up and coming riders.
     
    10-08-2010, 12:20 PM
  #3
Green Broke
I agree with Anabel. He's right.

No matter what, he's still a great rider
     
    10-10-2010, 04:52 PM
  #4
Green Broke
I'm in total agreement with the two above. I'm a young rider and let me tell you, most young riders are rich around here. Or there are options. I know people that are more than happy to split costs on travel and hotels with a fellow eventer and it isn't that hard to get a babysitting job to pay for entry fees and the like. The difference is those up and coming riders are probably still at the point of living off of parents funding and it isn't that hard to get help with it. Those professionals are just that, professionals. It's every penny going towards those horses and then he has a family, as many eventers do. Funding is tight, as is keeping a top level horse. And people don't want to sponser horse riders, I mean seriously.
     
    10-11-2010, 12:06 PM
  #5
Yearling
I also agree with the above 3 posters.

We need to cultivate our top riders so that they, in turn, can cultivate the next group of young riders. I believe that I know of the group of YRs that sparked this little rant of his and while they are all very talented, skilled riders, a lot of them DO have their parent's money and other options available to him. And I also agree that we should be focusing on developing our own *** levels events and, maybe, even a second **** event here in the US! I mean, why not? Europe has multiple **** events, the US definitely has the capability to hold more than just one every year. The thing is, there are PLENTY of opportunities for young riders to succeed here in the states, and when they have PROVEN themselves to be consistent top 10 finishers HERE should the USEF/USEA be providing any sort of funding for them to travel and compete internationally.
     
    10-11-2010, 12:35 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Rebecca Farms is more than capable of holding an international four star event, I agree with Strange.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    10-11-2010, 05:56 PM
  #7
Started
Ok, let me try to reiterate my point that didn't come across so well in the first post.

Boyd signed up for this game - he's been in the country for, what, 3 years? Made the team and represented the US at the WEGs. He gets to make a living in a LUXURY sport - no one is going to notice when he's not at work; unlike teachers, doctors, etc. And if he's going to be in the business, he should know how to look ahead and budget - it's not like he woke and decided "Hey! I'm going to try to make the WEG team!" He's been planning this for years, undoubtedly, so he should have thought of the hits he may take and planned accordingly, like any good business owner.

I understand that he lost time when he had to go to certain outings (AECS, etc) as part of the "tryout" process, but surely he took other horses with him to each event and made money by trailering and competing them for their owners. I believe I even read something about him teaching lessons in Georgia while he down there. But, what about Becky? Allison? All the riders who took the time to go to the mandatory competitions and still didn't get to compete at WEG? They gave up the same incomes he did, but they're not complaining. Plus, they DO have sponsors, Stormy - feed companies, tack companies, insurance companies, clothing companies and he doesn't own ALL (if any, I'm not too sure of his current ones) of his upper level horses - all of their bills get footed down to their owners, so his out of pocket expense is little; sure, he still has bills, but he's not paying for thei shoes, tack, veterinary care, his competition hotel rooms, etc. And it's not like he rides Neville Bardos for 12 hours a day and has no time to do anything else to make a profit...

He seems to have an entitlement mentality to me - he's complaining about the support that other riders, who may very well be his future team mates, recieve, all the while wanting more for himself. It seems very hypocritical to me that he has recieved the same money and is still receiving money - but doesn't want to share.

I can see his point about staying local first, but it has been said to riders that they need more international experience before even being thought about for selection for the winter training squad - so there is a need to go international. Some of those riders don't have the successful training business Boyd has, they are the people working 2 jobs and living off of Ramen noodles just to support their horse habit, but they have the horse and skills needed to get the job done - they just need financial help. And, even if those ** riders are sent to Europe and never make it to WEGs, Rolex, etc, the amount of knowledge and experience they will gain will be CRUCIAL when it comes to teaching at home, passing it down to their students who may one day be vying for a spot on the National Team.

I also think it's a good idea to continue to send riders who don't reside on the east coast - where they don't have as much access to world class events. I know his point is to improve the US' events across the country, but really - there still won't be the same level of competition here as there is in Europe. If we want to play with them at the World Championship level, then we have to play with them at the lower levels (No, not BN/N lower levels, lower CCI/CIC levels).

All in all, I'm sure that if competing at the upper levels on other people's horses is too financially taxing on him, then there are PLENTY of other riders who would jump at the chance to have the same oppurtunities as he has been given and continues to recieve. They would happily make the sacrifice to ride in the WEGs. What about all of us who sacrifice time with our family, horses, work, etc to volunteer and jump judge at the events that make it possible for him to compete his horses (that we can only dream of) there; thus, earning a spot on the National Team? Maybe he should think about us, instead of how he can only take 4 horses with him this weekend, instead of the usual 9...

I see his point, the above is what I think about it and about him coming across as a sore loser. He picked the job, if he doesn't like it - quit.
     
    10-11-2010, 06:25 PM
  #8
Trained
I could re iterate everything I have said, but I doubt it would go through.
It doesn't matter who your sponsors are unless your mother is the heiress of Coca-Cola or you have Mitt Romney behind you. These "sponsors" basically say "We'll give you $500 for every 'x' saddle we sell if someone mentions your name during purchase". It is taking these people AT LEAST $10,000 per month to keep these horses operating. $500 every three months or so does very little.
Not all owners foot all the bills for their horses too. And many of these horses are part owned as well.

It's a different kind of sacrifice. It's a "live in your horse trailer for 8 months" "risk losing all your students" "eat bread and butter for 8 months" "spend all your money on vet bills, training, board, feed and bedding while doing all your own barn work" sacrifice. It's not an "oh I think I'll go jump judge for a weekend" sacrifice.

Like I say. We can either continue to think small, make a bunch of decent trainers in NA by continuing on the same way. Funding whoever seems like a good idea, and anyone wanting to ride internationally will have to go to Europe to get trained. OR we can support our international athletes, develop them into masters of the sport and then up and comers would only have to travel a few hundred miles, instead of across an ocean.
     
    10-11-2010, 07:09 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Anabel said it best, and I'm not at a computer, so typing my thoughts would be hard, but I would like to say this: it os VERY VERY VERY easy to get international regonition in this country. There are international competitions all over this country. I had a friend competeing in one this spring and he has done numerous others without going terribly far. And we have some AMAZING courses here in our own backyard. Sure Europe is great, but experiance and international regonition do bot need to come from traveling overseas.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    10-11-2010, 07:48 PM
  #10
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
I could re iterate everything I have said, but I doubt it would go through.
It doesn't matter who your sponsors are unless your mother is the heiress of Coca-Cola or you have Mitt Romney behind you. These "sponsors" basically say "We'll give you $500 for every 'x' saddle we sell if someone mentions your name during purchase". It is taking these people AT LEAST $10,000 per month to keep these horses operating. $500 every three months or so does very little.
Not all owners foot all the bills for their horses too. And many of these horses are part owned as well..
I'd love to see your breakdown of how a top-notch competition horse costs $10,000 to maintain - I can see a few thousand, but ten? I'm not trying to be smart, it's a real honest-to-goodness question about how you get those figures...

As for owners, Boyd co-owns 1 competition horses and floats the training fees on another. I'd bet money the owners pay for everything else. They get the bill, the winnings and the prestige of saying "my horse won his advanced event at Fair Hill this past weekend." I've NEVER known a trainer to pay for other peoples' horse's needs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
It's a different kind of sacrifice. It's a "live in your horse trailer for 8 months" "risk losing all your students" "eat bread and butter for 8 months" "spend all your money on vet bills, training, board, feed and bedding while doing all your own barn work" sacrifice. It's not an "oh I think I'll go jump judge for a weekend" sacrifice..
Boyd is in PA - there are TONS and TONS of events within a 6 hour drive of his farm. And he has clients horses and students with him at shows - I've seen him so many times and he's always busy. Which is why I think it's ridiculous that he wants to allocate funds away from Jr/YR/AAs and give to himself and his team members, when he's making plenty of money for the industry... hard to make really good money, but I'm sure he does well. And I also doubt he does his own barn work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
Like I say. We can either continue to think small, make a bunch of decent trainers in NA by continuing on the same way. Funding whoever seems like a good idea, and anyone wanting to ride internationally will have to go to Europe to get trained. OR we can support our international athletes, develop them into masters of the sport and then up and comers would only have to travel a few hundred miles, instead of across an ocean.
We'll just have to see what happens... Unless they do improve our courses - which I doubt the USEA would shell out money for, it's up to the individual farms to build their XC courses and then the USEA approves them for competition, we're going to have to keep going to Europe. If the riders make it to the upper levels, they're going to be going there anyway - and the competition is much tougher over there, so they might as well go now and know what to expect, IMO.
     

« Vest | Help! »
Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Martin & Martin, by the London Harness Agency Kairi Horse Tack and Equipment 0 08-07-2010 11:13 AM
My New Martin Saddle Colorado Dobes Horse Tack and Equipment 5 01-18-2009 07:03 PM
Martin Saddles Colorado Dobes Horse Tack and Equipment 1 01-17-2009 12:11 PM
Martin Custom Saddle rjohnston1970 Horse Tack and Equipment 1 01-04-2009 03:37 PM
arthritis, ring bone or side bone causing infection TWHgal Horse Health 4 11-14-2007 08:49 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0