Question about XC jumps
 
 

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Question about XC jumps

This is a discussion on Question about XC jumps within the Eventing forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Xc jump for novice
  • Novice xc jumps

 
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    07-01-2010, 07:24 AM
  #1
Showing
Question about XC jumps

I've noticed most XC jumps have 2 halfs: lower and higher (I've seen it on videos posted here as well as on XC path in park where I go to ride). So is it up to the rider to pick the half (higher or lower) or it's defined in rules prior the competition? And if defined what if you jump the "wrong" half then?
     
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    07-01-2010, 07:45 AM
  #2
Banned
I believe doing the lower portion or the higher portion of some jumps is designated by what level you are showing in.


Some jumps also have an easier height that either takes longer or is more technical to execute or they offer the larger height that might be more direct and the rider can choose between the two depending on their horse.
     
    07-01-2010, 08:48 AM
  #3
Started
Normally it's because the one jump is being used at 2 or 3 different levels. Come show day, it will have flags attached to the middle of it so you know which section you're supposed to go over.
     
    07-01-2010, 09:05 AM
  #4
Trained
It all depends on what level you are compeating at.

The Levels go from lowest to highest:

Beginner Novice max fences 2'7"
Novice max fences 2'11"
Training max fences 3'3"
Preliminary max fences 3'7"
Intermediate max fences 3'11"
Advanced max fences 4'1"/4'3"ish

And then you hit Professional

1*
2*
3*
4* is Olympic and Rolex Level.

Most courses in Michigan offer levels from Beginner Novice to Training. Then when you get to Prelim and bigger, there are a few courses in Michigan that offer these levels. Most riders at those levels go out of state to compeate at bigger, rated USEA courses.

So when you see vids like mine, those courses are set from BN, N to T. So the smaller fences, are for BN, the medium fences are for N and the bigger fences out of the 3, are for T.

The course is organized and set up before the comp happens, where each fence is marked and labled. The course is marked out on a map for all riders who are compeating, so that when you walk the course the day before the comp, you'll know where your going and what fences you are riding. Most Eventers walk the course 3 to 4 times. If you jump a fence that is not yours, you get eliminated.

Beginner Novice to Novice, the fences are strait forward and basic. Basic striding, basic rhythm, nothing too technical. The point is to welcome you to the sport, and to teach you the basics so that when you climb the ladder of levels, you are prepared. Most of the fences are just point and shoot. There is NOTHING technical at lower levels, not until you get Prelim.

When you get to Training, that's when combinations arise and that's when drops appear and tougher terrain appears...but not so rough.

Preliminary is when things are alot tougher and so on and so on.

The jump from BN to N isn't that difficult. And the jump from N to T isn't either - BUT the jump from T to P, is!

There are no "option" fences either at lower levels, you jump what is put infront of you. If you cannot, you are eliminated. Reason being is, if you can't do what is there for low levels, you have no business moving up.
     
    07-01-2010, 10:16 AM
  #5
Showing
Thank you, folks! That's really interesting. So do ALL fences have 2 halfs? I'm curious, because on XC course in a park there is one fence all the same height and it looks pretty big (and wide) - one of those fences you put flowers on top. I mean you can go around it still, but it seems to be too much for the beginner. All other fences are in 2 halfs. So does it happen on a course you have to go around the fence intentionally? And BTW, if you go around unintentionally (horse refused to jump) do you fail or just have points off?
     
    07-01-2010, 07:18 PM
  #6
Yearling
Not all fences will have two "halves." Only those that are being used for different levels. There are definitely times when you have to go around jumps. At a show in Louisiana I went to there were different level jumps all throughout the water complex and you had to know how you were going to navigate through them to get the best line to your jump.
     
    07-01-2010, 08:04 PM
  #7
Green Broke
^Holly hill? They REALLY need an alligator jump (we were discussing this on the way to Meadowcreek :)) and they change it SO MUCH! The two big logs are gone and they have houses in there now. It loooked like a fun course to jump.

Everyone else covered it pretty well. But I would also like to add that you will encounter jumps that don't have a BN, N, T, P, I, A, line up. You really have to know where you're going in events :)
     
    07-01-2010, 08:06 PM
  #8
Green Broke
[QUOTE=MIEventer;677051]
Beginner Novice to Novice, the fences are strait forward and basic. Basic striding, basic rhythm, nothing too technical. The point is to welcome you to the sport, and to teach you the basics so that when you climb the ladder of levels, you are prepared. Most of the fences are just point and shoot. There is NOTHING technical at lower levels, not until you get Prelim.

When you get to Training, that's when combinations arise and that's when drops appear and tougher terrain appears...but not so rough.
[QUOTE]

I would like to point out that, down here, we have drops and banks at BN, and things get technical at N. Like my last BN had a combo on XC, and all novice courses will have at least one or two combos on course. Most including down hill or up hill or bank jumping. AND the water complexes are usually some sort of combonation or have some sort of jump in or out of the water. So it really is different on what region you're in.
     
    07-01-2010, 09:25 PM
  #9
Yearling
^ Yep, Holly Hill! And here's an example of a jump out of water at novice level. It's tiny, but it's definitely a question not all horses are ready for.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Severson,_Kate_177_fs.jpg (52.4 KB, 94 views)
     
    07-01-2010, 10:23 PM
  #10
Trained
It has nothing to do with the region - it has to do with the rating of the course, and whether it is USEA certified/recognized or not.

And we have water jumps where Novice jumps in, gallops through and jumps out. Easy peasy, lemon squeezy.

And BN and N and T have combinations- but for BN, the fences are little burps maxed at 2'7" with 3 strides inbetween them. Nothing to blink at, and the level of the combination being encountered are just point and shoot.

Nothing CLOSE to being technical like Training to Prelim - give me a break.

I will repeat - there is NOTHING technical at Beginner Novice to Novice. Just point and shoot.
     

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