Toe postion
 
 

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Toe postion

This is a discussion on Toe postion within the Eventing forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Stirrup points centred riding
  • Toes in, feet straight english riding

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  • 1 Post By mildot
  • 1 Post By DressageDreamer

 
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    05-07-2012, 12:16 PM
  #1
Foal
Toe postion

My instructor keeps telling me to turn my toe in, but when I do my ankels turn in on themselfs so that only the edge of my foot is touching the iron. Any suggestions on how I can fix this?
     
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    05-07-2012, 12:37 PM
  #2
Banned
You need to rotate your thighs inwards to get the toes to point more to the front. I learned that from Sally Swift's book Centered Riding.

As you found out rotating the ankles does not work.
bsms likes this.
     
    05-07-2012, 12:56 PM
  #3
Foal
You need to roll your whole leg in which then will help your toes.
     
    05-07-2012, 01:08 PM
  #4
Weanling
As mentioned above, the entire leg is rolled in so that the inside of your thigh and calf (the parts that will touch each other if you put your legs together when sitting) are touching the saddle/horse. You may literally need to grab your thigh from the back of your leg with your hand and turn it in until you become used to the position. Eventually it becomes automatic. Toes should be facing forward, not in towards the horse.
     
    05-07-2012, 02:23 PM
  #5
Foal
Thank you!
When I started riding engilish my old instructor told me to point my toes out. So now I'll have to fix that.
Thank you!!
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    05-07-2012, 02:34 PM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cash12    
Thank you!
When I started riding engilish my old instructor told me to point my toes out. So now I'll have to fix that.
Thank you!!
Posted via Mobile Device
Bad, bad instructor - LOL. If you can buy or check out from the library the book "Centered Riding" by Sally Swift mentioned in a previous reply, I highly recommend it. I have it and it is a good book. At times it seems a little weird but honestly it has some great visuals for you to use and information for becoming balanced, etc.
crimsonsky likes this.
     
    05-07-2012, 02:59 PM
  #7
Yearling
Oddly enough when I curl my toes it helps me keep the proper part of my leg on the horse. And when I think about putting a little more weight on the outside of my foot, which is something I'm supposed to do while I walk for my physical therapy. Might help you out lol. Or I might just be really weird.
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    05-07-2012, 03:25 PM
  #8
Weanling
Curling your toes creates tension in your leg which is something you do not want. You want to have nice, relaxed legs that are stretching down.
     
    05-07-2012, 03:40 PM
  #9
Trained
Toes out are a symptom. The most important part of your seat is an upright torso, and weighted legs. Practice riding without stirrups for the first 1/2-hour to an hour. This will connect you with your horse's movements and wear out your ability to push yourself out of the saddle with your stirrups. It will also place your feet with your toes pointed mostly forward.
When you pick up the stirrups after this you will have a weighted heel.
No one tells you to grip the horse with your legs, but you must have a relaxed grip to keep you on the horse, or else you will slide off of him.

Deliberately pointing toes out is for ballet. Just as in dance, this rotates out the top of your legs, as well. It's great for balance and plies on the ground, but it causes you to lose your balance while riding.
Bear in mind that some people are not able to point their toes straight forward while riding. Therefore, some riders with very good seats look like they deliberately point their toes outwards. Perhaps your instructor is one of these people and has made the assumption that is normal and expected.
     

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