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Broody chicken

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    10-06-2012, 12:36 PM
  #11
Weanling
Yup they usually need penning up to keep them from nests or eggs. Most will stay broody even w/o eggs. I pen them up for a wk or less. You can tell when they loose the broodiness. They stop clucking and puffing all up.

Its not good for their health to let them stay broody w/o hatching. Best to break them of it immediately if your not interested in hatching.
     
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    10-06-2012, 01:56 PM
  #12
Weanling
I had a broody hen like this too. I just let her do her thing. I brought her food and water and let her sit all she wanted.
     
    10-07-2012, 12:08 AM
  #13
Yearling
Fern is being a idiot!! She isn't molting. At all.yes I can a shine light where she is sitting but it wouldn't be very practical.we have a light that we turn on at night but its turned down wards so there is not much of it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians    
Can you shine a light where she's sitting? I had a Sebright go broody and God Almighty that was a pain! She lost have her weight and nothing I did would break her of it. She finally molted all her feathers and is 90% back to normal now. She finally snapped out of it just as I was going to confine her to a wire dog crate out in the yard.
     
    10-07-2012, 12:14 AM
  #14
Yearling
Personally I do not mind hatching. I am afraid she will lose intrest in them after a month or two .probably a sill fear but some one said that they sometimes will. Also I do not have a rooster. Just trying to find different options.to bad I am running low on them.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dead Rabbit    
yup they usually need penning up to keep them from nests or eggs. Most will stay broody even w/o eggs. I pen them up for a wk or less. You can tell when they loose the broodiness. They stop clucking and puffing all up.

Its not good for their health to let them stay broody w/o hatching. Best to break them of it immediately if your not interested in hatching.
     
    10-07-2012, 08:46 AM
  #15
Banned
I just leave our broody hens alone and let them get over themselves. The Buff Orpingtons are the worst! I just continue to gather eggs every day over their loud protests. One Buff gets pretty aggressive when she's broody, I just wear a big welder's glove and collect the eggs anyway.

This spring we picked the two broodiest, separated them from the rest of the flock and let them sit on clutches of eggs but they gave up before they hatched.
     
    10-07-2012, 08:50 AM
  #16
Weanling
It takes them 21 days to hatch. They will keep their young chicks with them for a few wks before they start to wean them. By then they would do ok on their own, under normal circumstances.

Just seperate her from any nests or eggs. She will calm down. It only takes a few days actually. I usually keep them sep. For a wk just to make sure.

Some breeds are more broody than others. Bantams usually go broody more so than standard size breeds. And some bantam breeds are to the extreme. I.e. Silkies, cochins, seramas, old english games etc.

I occasionally have one of my sex link hens go broody. I immediately seperate her. Her job is to lay. Once they go broody it takes them a few wks to get their system back in order to start laying.
The reason why its not good for their health is both physical and mental. Broodiness is a mental thing. If you continue to allow them to think they are setting and they are not. It messes with their minds. Plus after 3 wks on a nest a hens body is pulled way down. Not just weight but the inside workings. So if they go beyond the natural 3 wk period. You can imagine the snow ball effect. Even if feed is carried to them or you throw them off the nest so they eat. Its not the same. A chicken naturally eats all day long. They are browsers of sorts. Except for the afternoon rest periiods of an hr to two hrs.

Sorry I've rambled. I enjoy discussing fowl. I've had chickens all my life.
     
    10-07-2012, 12:59 PM
  #17
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by horsecrazygirl    
Fern is being a idiot!! She isn't molting. At all.yes I can a shine light where she is sitting but it wouldn't be very practical.we have a light that we turn on at night but its turned down wards so there is not much of it.
I'd either crate her away from the nest, or I'd 'increase' her daylight by shining more light on her. The crate is guaranteed to work, the light.......maybe.

I was told to put the crate up, have an open floor so she can't pretend she's sitting on eggs and keep food and water in front of her.
     
    10-07-2012, 08:40 PM
  #18
Yearling
I have a lovely Cochin who goes broody often. There are a couple of "remedies" to snap them out of it. Though they can seem a bit harsh, remember that it's very hard on a hen's body to be broody. They often don't leave the nest to poo or eat for 3 days in a stretch, which is really harsh on their body. By getting her out of it, you're doing her a favor.

Here are 3 options:
-1- Do you need chicks? There's no easier way to raise chicks than to let Momma do it. They're pros. Let her sit on some eggs for 2-3 weeks. Then go to the feed store a buy fresh chicks (preferably 0-3 days old) or order from a hatchery. During the night, remove her eggs and replace with the chicks. You have a very good chance that she'll wake up and think her eggs hatched. I've done this and got some very healthy chicks with little effort, and a very happy non-broody hen.

-2- The isolation method, where you put her somewhere with good ventilation I've been told works well, though I haven't tried it. The key here isn't to keep her uncomfortable so she can't "nest". The actual science behind it is that by putting her on a wire-bottom cage, you have good air-circulation to her underside, which helps cool her down. When hens are broody, their temp goes up. By cooling them down, you can break the broodiness.

-3- I've done this one very effectively. I would dunk the lower half of her body in cool (not cold) water for a couple of minutes to cool her off. If she went back in her nestbox, I'd do it again. It didn't work for a whole day. Then my 7-year-old decided to "help", and unbeknowst to me, she put the hen in cool water for probably a good 10 minutes. After bringing the poor bird back from the brink of hypothermia, she was no longer broody, and started laying the next day. I wouldn't recommend my daughter's method, though - that was a bit much.
     
    10-08-2012, 04:49 PM
  #19
Yearling
Ok I tried the umm dunking but I like the chicken in the water her back end but only for like half a minute because she wiggled out.and only once. But if I have to keep doing it then I will. I like the chicks idea better.





Quote:
Originally Posted by freia    
I have a lovely Cochin who goes broody often. There are a couple of "remedies" to snap them out of it. Though they can seem a bit harsh, remember that it's very hard on a hen's body to be broody. They often don't leave the nest to poo or eat for 3 days in a stretch, which is really harsh on their body. By getting her out of it, you're doing her a favor.

Here are 3 options:
-1- Do you need chicks? There's no easier way to raise chicks than to let Momma do it. They're pros. Let her sit on some eggs for 2-3 weeks. Then go to the feed store a buy fresh chicks (preferably 0-3 days old) or order from a hatchery. During the night, remove her eggs and replace with the chicks. You have a very good chance that she'll wake up and think her eggs hatched. I've done this and got some very healthy chicks with little effort, and a very happy non-broody hen.

-2- The isolation method, where you put her somewhere with good ventilation I've been told works well, though I haven't tried it. The key here isn't to keep her uncomfortable so she can't "nest". The actual science behind it is that by putting her on a wire-bottom cage, you have good air-circulation to her underside, which helps cool her down. When hens are broody, their temp goes up. By cooling them down, you can break the broodiness.

-3- I've done this one very effectively. I would dunk the lower half of her body in cool (not cold) water for a couple of minutes to cool her off. If she went back in her nestbox, I'd do it again. It didn't work for a whole day. Then my 7-year-old decided to "help", and unbeknowst to me, she put the hen in cool water for probably a good 10 minutes. After bringing the poor bird back from the brink of hypothermia, she was no longer broody, and started laying the next day. I wouldn't recommend my daughter's method, though - that was a bit much.
     
    10-08-2012, 04:52 PM
  #20
Yearling
Ok the separating looks like the best option.
And if we chicken newbies didn't have anyone rambling on about chickens how would we learn?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Dead Rabbit    
it takes them 21 days to hatch. They will keep their young chicks with them for a few wks before they start to wean them. By then they would do ok on their own, under normal circumstances.

Just seperate her from any nests or eggs. She will calm down. It only takes a few days actually. I usually keep them sep. For a wk just to make sure.

Some breeds are more broody than others. Bantams usually go broody more so than standard size breeds. And some bantam breeds are to the extreme. I.e. Silkies, cochins, seramas, old english games etc.

I occasionally have one of my sex link hens go broody. I immediately seperate her. Her job is to lay. Once they go broody it takes them a few wks to get their system back in order to start laying.
The reason why its not good for their health is both physical and mental. Broodiness is a mental thing. If you continue to allow them to think they are setting and they are not. It messes with their minds. Plus after 3 wks on a nest a hens body is pulled way down. Not just weight but the inside workings. So if they go beyond the natural 3 wk period. You can imagine the snow ball effect. Even if feed is carried to them or you throw them off the nest so they eat. Its not the same. A chicken naturally eats all day long. They are browsers of sorts. Except for the afternoon rest periiods of an hr to two hrs.

Sorry I've rambled. I enjoy discussing fowl. I've had chickens all my life.
     

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