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Broody chicken

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        10-08-2012, 05:29 PM
      #21
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horsecrazygirl    
    ok the separating looks like the best option.
    And if we chicken newbies didn't have anyone rambling on about chickens how would we learn?
    Not just newbie chicken-people ramble about their chickens. Everyone I know with a backyard flock loves their chickens and will gladly ramble on about them. They're really cool animals when you take the time to get to know them and see how they really work.
    My flock is a bunch of spoiled divas, but since they eat my bugs and kitchen garbage and give me fertilizer and the perfect food in return, they can be divas all they want. I have Marilyn (Monroe), Jackie (O), Penelope (Cruz), Hally (Berry), Audry (Hepburn), Amelia (Earhart), Goldie (Hawn), and then some others the kids gave cutsie names to.
         
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        10-08-2012, 11:12 PM
      #22
    Yearling
    Yes that is very true the rambling part. My chickens soon will be spoiled. My chickens name is also Goldie short for Goldilocks. When we got her she kept switching nests. Your chickens names are very cute though I love them.
         
        10-18-2012, 03:55 PM
      #23
    Yearling
    Ok one question due to some very unfortunate events we are now 3 chickens short. Some cyote thought that chickens taste real goo and took 1 and the other two are gone.fern is still broody.so I am thinking we should go get chicks and slip them under her at night.but how many? Will she accept them if she can't see them?will she raise them?
         
        10-18-2012, 07:51 PM
      #24
    Weanling
    If she's been broody for awhile and setting on a nest for almost a wk. She will easily except them as for how many....what breed is she?
         
        10-18-2012, 08:40 PM
      #25
    Yearling
    Sorry about the massacre. That's always a big bummer.

    It's hard to refer to Dead Rabbit as Dead Rabbit, because he looks nothing like the dead rabbits around here...

    But as Dead Rabbit says, breed counts. Some breeds (RIR) have been bred for egg production, so they've had their mothering abilities bred out. Heritage breeds have been allowed to keep their natural mothering traits a little more.

    After my Cochin sat on rotten, infertile eggs for 3 weeks, I took mercy on her and looked into the chick-thing. The owner of my favorite feed-store says she regularly gives hens chicks up to 2 weeks old without problems. I've read that they need to be no more than 3 days to bond properly. I got a 1-day-old, 3, and 4-day-old, and they all did great.

    Make sure you have a good mothering-breed.
    Make sure she's been on the eggs 1-2 weeks. Many birds will sit on eggs for a week or so, then decide it's more fun to scratch and peck, and give up. If she's been sitting for a good while, she might be a good mother.
    Get the freshest chicks you can.
    Don't get more chicks than she can fit under her to keep warm. A nice, big Cochin or Jersey giant can take up to a dozen - max. A smaller hen, or first-time mom, should have far less. Any hen can easily take at least 4. It doesn't matter that the number of chicks doesn't match the egg-count. They can't count.
    I've heard that you need to let the chicks be near the hen for a couple of hours, so she can hear them peep. Apparently, that switches her hormones from aggressive to protective. I tried this, and she tried to peck them to death when I finally gave them to her anyway. I then waited until dark, put them under, and by morning all was well.
    No sane chicken is going to mess with a broody hen or a new mom. However, if you can give them their own little house or area for a while, everyone will be more relaxed and happy.
         
        10-18-2012, 08:44 PM
      #26
    Yearling
    I am trying to figure that out...i got her as a one year old. I think she is a buff orpington. But I am not sure.
         
        10-18-2012, 08:47 PM
      #27
    Yearling
    Since we keep taking eggs out from her she doesn't sit on eggs very long.but if we leave her she will sit on them until we take her out of the nest. I know definitely know she is not a Rhode island red.she is very protective of the nest.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by freia    
    Sorry about the massacre. That's always a big bummer.

    It's hard to refer to Dead Rabbit as Dead Rabbit, because he looks nothing like the dead rabbits around here...

    But as Dead Rabbit says, breed counts. Some breeds (RIR) have been bred for egg production, so they've had their mothering abilities bred out. Heritage breeds have been allowed to keep their natural mothering traits a little more.

    After my Cochin sat on rotten, infertile eggs for 3 weeks, I took mercy on her and looked into the chick-thing. The owner of my favorite feed-store says she regularly gives hens chicks up to 2 weeks old without problems. I've read that they need to be no more than 3 days to bond properly. I got a 1-day-old, 3, and 4-day-old, and they all did great.

    Make sure you have a good mothering-breed.
    Make sure she's been on the eggs 1-2 weeks. Many birds will sit on eggs for a week or so, then decide it's more fun to scratch and peck, and give up. If she's been sitting for a good while, she might be a good mother.
    Get the freshest chicks you can.
    Don't get more chicks than she can fit under her to keep warm. A nice, big Cochin or Jersey giant can take up to a dozen - max. A smaller hen, or first-time mom, should have far less. Any hen can easily take at least 4.
    I've heard that you need to let the chicks be near the hen for a couple of hours, so she can hear them peep. Apparently, that switches her hormones from aggressive to protective. I tried this, and she tried to peck them to death when I finally gave them to her anyway. I then waited until dark, put them under, and by morning all was well.
    No sane chicken is going to mess with a broody hen or a new mom. However, if you can give them their own little house or area for a while, everyone will be more relaxed and happy.
         
        10-18-2012, 08:56 PM
      #28
    Weanling
    On rare occasions some of the layer breeds will still go broody. A RIR will. Buffs orphingtons will easily. Some of my sexlink layers go broody. Most aggrevating it is.

    A larger breed will easily take a dz. When young and little they can cover them easily. But its when they get a little size on them the hen may have trouble covering them. This time of yr in some areas its already cold so it will be harder for hen to keep too many chicks covered. But the strong survive. The weak die. And that's the way it should be. You get better stronger healthier, more productive fowl this way.
         
        10-18-2012, 08:59 PM
      #29
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by freia    
    Sorry about the massacre. That's always a big bummer.

    It's hard to refer to Dead Rabbit as Dead Rabbit, because he looks nothing like the dead rabbits around here..
    .

    But as Dead Rabbit says, breed counts. Some breeds (RIR) have been bred for egg production, so they've had their mothering abilities bred out. Heritage breeds have been allowed to keep their natural mothering traits a little more.

    After my Cochin sat on rotten, infertile eggs for 3 weeks, I took mercy on her and looked into the chick-thing. The owner of my favorite feed-store says she regularly gives hens chicks up to 2 weeks old without problems. I've read that they need to be no more than 3 days to bond properly. I got a 1-day-old, 3, and 4-day-old, and they all did great.

    Make sure you have a good mothering-breed.
    Make sure she's been on the eggs 1-2 weeks. Many birds will sit on eggs for a week or so, then decide it's more fun to scratch and peck, and give up. If she's been sitting for a good while, she might be a good mother.
    Get the freshest chicks you can.
    Don't get more chicks than she can fit under her to keep warm. A nice, big Cochin or Jersey giant can take up to a dozen - max. A smaller hen, or first-time mom, should have far less. Any hen can easily take at least 4. It doesn't matter that the number of chicks doesn't match the egg-count. They can't count.
    I've heard that you need to let the chicks be near the hen for a couple of hours, so she can hear them peep. Apparently, that switches her hormones from aggressive to protective. I tried this, and she tried to peck them to death when I finally gave them to her anyway. I then waited until dark, put them under, and by morning all was well.
    No sane chicken is going to mess with a broody hen or a new mom. However, if you can give them their own little house or area for a while, everyone will be more relaxed and happy.

    LOL...my last name is Pierce. My wife calls me this. So if you prefer use my name.

    On other sites in past, others was shocked at what I look like, cause with some of my posts they get a mental picture im an old crotchety, grouchy, mean old *******. I used to be very opinionated, and argumentative. I've since tried to be a better forum member.
    freia and horsecrazygirl like this.
         
        10-18-2012, 09:10 PM
      #30
    Trained
    Why does anyone care if she is broody? So what? I don't understand. I never had any issue with that. If one hen was a bit broody or cranky, I'd still just reach under and gather whatever eggs were there unless I wanted them to hatch out. I never "delivered" feed and water to a broody hen. I figure she will get hungry enough to go and get what she needs when she needs it.
         

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