Do female goats go into "heat"?
 
 

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Do female goats go into "heat"?

This is a discussion on Do female goats go into "heat"? within the Farm Animals forums, part of the Farm Forum category
  • How many times does a boer goat go into rut
  • How often do horses go into heat

 
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    12-03-2010, 09:05 PM
  #1
Yearling
Exclamation Do female goats go into "heat"?

I really need some help figuring out what might be going on with our little Emmie.

I am going to apologize now for the length of this, and hope that some one
Kind and knowledgeable takes the time to read through this, and give me some advice...

Here is some back ground info on our situation.
I have never owned a goat before, thought about it though.
Aug. Of '09
a friend of ours gave Emmie to us as a surprise "Barn Warming" gift.
The friend was guesstimating her age at about 3 months old.

She was kind of a rescue, she had been living with a woman who got her just to keep her horse company. Apparently this woman was NOT a nice person, Emmie ran away to a distant neighbors house, and when the woman found out, she said she was coming over with her shotgun to kill her. Seriously.
The neighbors called up my friend to see if she could take her in, and "walla" I now have a sweet little goat!


So, since she was very young, she has not known she was a goat. She went from living with that horse briefly, to living with my two Llamas.
They absolutely adore each other!

Getting to the point here...

Rarely, if ever, do you hear a peep out of her. She is extremely quiet for a goat.
We live up in the mountains on acreage and have some neighbors, at a distance, that have milk goats that you can hear bleating fairly often at times of the day, but especially later in the evening because they only milk once per day, at night. Emmie has never shown that she even acknowledges their presence.

Last night Emmie started just "wailing" away and acting all skittish. I was fairly concerned because like I said, you never hear a peep out'a her!
I checked her out physically and found nothing wrong, I checked the barn, paddock and stall, nothing out of the ordinary either.
I stayed around and watched her for awhile, she seemed to be looking off into the dark woods when she would bleat.
My miniature horses, and the Llamas were all as calm as could be, but I did a walk around to see if I could find any predator tracks in the snow, and saw nothing.

She was fine when I went out and checked on her at 3am, and then at both feedings today as well. But I did notice after I fed tonight she started to bleat occasionally, and she was looking off in that same direction.

It hit me that she seems to be always looking towards the neighbors with the goats!
Is it possible that after almost two years, she is maybe realizing they are "her kind"?
My other thought is maybe they have a Billy. If they do, would she maybe be in a heat and calling out to him?
Am I just an absolute idiot, or does this happen?

I would so appreciate any thoughts, ideas, or advise on this.
I did not sleep at all last night, (still thinking it was maybe a predator I guess...)
I don't think it will keep me up tonight, but would sure like to have a better idea on what might be bothering our little Emmie! And what I can do to help her with it.

Thanks in advance!


     
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    12-03-2010, 11:31 PM
  #2
Foal
Yes goats do come in heat about every 3 weeks but for roughly 36 hours- or is it 3 days. Most bucks are in "rut" this time of year, where they wear a lot of buck scent and smell pretty bad. Perhaps Emmie has caught a whiff of this- does really, really like the smell of it. They get talkative and will wag their tail quite often. But just in case this is not the cause of her vocalizing be vigilant for any predators, I lost 16 kids last December in northeast Florida.
     
    12-03-2010, 11:48 PM
  #3
Yearling
Thank you so much for answering.....

So, then from the sounds of it, if this is what is going on, she will probably resume her "normal" behavior in a few days then?
She's not too young to react that way?
I guess she will be 2 years old in May....
I know horses are "mature" at 4, when are goats?

I think I will be calling the Grants tomorrow, at a decent time, and find out if they do have a Billy or not.
If they do not, would you have any other ideas on this?

I do feel pretty darn confident that it is not a predator situation, I say this because as I mentioned in my long winded post above, that all my other critters are completely calm. If there were some thing on the property, I would be sure to get signs from the others.
Especially Gus, our male Llama.
He gives me a warning call if he even sees an unfamiliar neighbor dog at a distance...
And he protects Emmie with all he has, he seriously adores her, it was love at first site when she was brought over that first day!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 2009_08210055 [640x480].jpg (67.1 KB, 1089 views)
     
    12-04-2010, 12:02 AM
  #4
Foal
This is unrelated..but they're ADORABLE! :3
     
    12-04-2010, 12:42 AM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by RhapsGirl    
This is unrelated..but they're ADORABLE! :3
Thanks, LOL!
They both look pretty scruffy in that pic, being early spring and all....
     
    12-05-2010, 04:54 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Goats go into heat around 6months-1year. My Boer doeling went into heat at 9 months, there's a mucus-y discharge coming from the vulva-ish area. This is normal, in a few day's she'll be all good. (:
     
    12-06-2010, 08:38 PM
  #7
Weanling
They do go into heat every few weeks. Also a buck in rut can send them into heat. When we take our Boer does over to the buck they are usually in heat within a week or 2 depending on how long ago they were in heat. We currently have 3 expecting does 1 for January and 2 for March-ish.
In all we have:
~~Does~~
Janice
Daisy
Cassie
Tinkerbell(non-breeding)
Blossom(Retired breeder)

And then we have our buck. Buckwheat. Insane and Crazy but produces good babies.
     
    12-07-2010, 12:46 PM
  #8
Yearling
Thanks every one for the input!

After observing her for awhile I did come to the conclusion she was definitely in heat.
My Emmie has become a woman, LOL!!!
The lack of appetite, the calling 'fer a man, and when I did a behind the scenes peek, she was swollen up....

Just happy to know nothing is wrong with her!
She is back to her old self now, but I know now what I can expect in about 21 days.
Some one else told me that heats usually run between September and January, is that pretty correct?
And what is their gestation period then?

.
     
    12-07-2010, 08:18 PM
  #9
Trained
Emmies a cutie!! I havemt read the whole thread but Allie, well im not sure if she did or not......it is pretty likely that she may be realiseing they are her own kind but she would have known that she was a goat, just if she hadnt seen one before then she may be a little suprised. Totally unrelated but, my Allie is a triplet and you should have seen her when she realised thatb her brothers lookied like her!! We had her when she was a week old and bottle fed her for months! Im not sure if she was ever in heat as we didnt know what to look for. Although she acted weird around Zorro the pony a few times........hmmmmmmm.....
     
    12-08-2010, 12:12 PM
  #10
Yearling
PintoTess, I guess I should not say she doesn't know she is a goat.
I think all creatures know by instinct.

It is that she has only been raised with my Llamas, and there fore she does not display the same habits as goats....
She is silent, (except apparently during heat cycles!) she does not rub her horns on every thing available, things like that....

Allie and her two siblings must have been sooo tiny at birth, did they all survive then?

,

     

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