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Questions for goat owners!

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    07-06-2012, 07:33 PM
  #11
Banned
We feed my goats pellets and hay or alfalfa. Sweet feed isn't healthy for
Goats. It causes gloating which can lead to other health problems.
     
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    07-06-2012, 08:31 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Ok, so I asked my kids 4h leader who raises goats and shows. She feeds 2 parts Nutrena goat feed to 1 part calf manna and 1 part black oils sunflower seeds. Fed twice a day, with free choice Timothy mix grass hay and 1/4 flake alfalfa hay per goat. Her girls are always in beautiful shape and her babies are fat and sassy. Each girl raises twins every year, and this year one raised triplets with no trouble.
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    07-08-2012, 04:59 PM
  #13
Started
Thanks all!!!


We picked up the two new goats, these girls are in much nicer condition.


They were also being fed the Purina goat chow mix. So this is the feed they are all currently on, not sure if I'll stick with it or change it http://www.goatchow.com/OURPRODUCTS/PRODUCTS/GoatChow/default.aspx

We are working the first goat (Maureen) up slowly to more feed and I did de-worm her.

Do you soak your alfalfa pellets? They seem big for the goats.

Has anyone used beet pulp for goats? I read something about it and wondered about feeding some to Maureen.

Also. Baking soda? I keep reading about leaving free choice baking soda for them to nibble on?

...I will pick up some calf mana for Maureen also. And I put in an order for the Molly's herbal, in the mean time just used Ivermectrin since the colt is drinking her milk, not us.
     
    07-08-2012, 05:12 PM
  #14
Weanling
I can provide a few answers.

She appears bony, and that's not very good, especially if she's to be feeding a horse! I would give more feed than a pound.
I would give her some kind of flax seed or vegetable oil in her feed to add to the fat, but very gradually and slowly, and this will improve her overall condition. I would also feed calf manna.

Halter or collar? I have always preferred those chain collars with the plastic tube handle. I have had halters, and they tend to fit awkwardly on goats. Goats can be very dramatic, so don't feel sorry for her if she starts coughing and gagging when you are trying to lead her with it. Our goats would act like they were dying every time we walked them.
     
    07-10-2012, 12:30 AM
  #15
Foal
We've had goats that would give a gallon or more a day and we usually fed them the same mixed hay as the horses. As much as they'll eat unless they're getting too fat.

We do mix alfalfa pellets to the goats feed when they were milked twice a day. Then the goat can be eating the whole time you're milking, but not get too much grain.

They also go out on pasture some, but if you have funny tasting weeds once you're drinking the milk you'll notice it tastes weird lol.

I would also make sure they have free choice salt and goat minerals.

As far as the uneven udder, as you know, that comes from the kid only drinking off of one side. That very well can give a goat mastitis and the previous owners should have been milking it twice a day on both sides all along to prevent that and keep the udder even. A well bred dairy goat produces much too much milk for one baby anyway and even if the baby is drinking evenly it likely will not drink enough. In a best case scenerio it will cut down the doe's future milk production, but it can cause other problems as well.

Along with the signs of mastitis that have already been mentioned you will also want to make sure one side of the udder is not hotter than the other as this can also be an indication.

We leave our goats collars on. They are either the plastic link or dog collars and we've never had a problem that way.

Goats usually don't need dewormed as often as horses. It depends on a lot of factors though, including your area so you're going to have to do more research on yours. Generally you have to toss the milk for a while after deworming. We give some of it to the cats. Depending on the dewormer you may be able to use the milk for the foal though.

Be wary, some worms that have little affect on other animals can kill a goat in a short time. Know what you have in your area. Some really need to be prevented rather than taken care of later. Read a lot on this subject.

I love how shiny and healthy your new goats look :)

I would be asking their previous owners lots of questions...

Goats are not my thing, ours belong to my mother. I just do the dirty work like giving shots, trimming hooves, and helping with any medical issues they might have (which is rare). I am no expert, but have a LOT of hands on experience with some pretty nice sannans. They are stubborn creatures by nature but just like anything else, with good training and proper care they come around :)

I wish you the best of luck with yours and I hope you love them!
     

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