Sheep Questions (Especially Shetlands!) - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 29 Old 01-25-2014, 12:28 AM
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they can be "rooed"

What does this mean please?

.....says another sucker who suddenly fancies keeping some Shetlands...

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post #12 of 29 Old 01-25-2014, 12:33 AM
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There are actually a bunch for sale in my area! Geez... I am the biggest gomer ever -.-

Is 100$ a reasonable price for a one year old ram? What about an ewe?

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post #13 of 29 Old 01-25-2014, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Shropshirerosie View Post
they can be "rooed"

What does this mean please?

.....says another sucker who suddenly fancies keeping some Shetlands...
I thought that when I saw it written lol. "Rooed" is the term ("rooing") for basically pulling the fleece off by hand. They shed (some more than others) unlike most modern breeds so you time it with the break in the fleece (when the old fleece is pretty much out, though obviously still attached) and the new fleece is coming in) and just do it by hand. Obviously much better than shearing since you have no second cuts and the rooing is "perfect" unlike even the best shearing job.

ROOING

(this sheep doesn't seem to be a fan of having several people do it at once haha)

I guess I shouldn't tell you guys how absurdly easy and "cost efficient" they are, esp compared to the horses we are all used to!
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post #14 of 29 Old 01-25-2014, 07:35 PM
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^xD That sheep looks a lil sad.

You can use wool for like... knitting, right? /Zexious is a dumb city girl

The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
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post #15 of 29 Old 01-25-2014, 07:38 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks everybody! I appreciate all the great info! As far as I understand from reading the 4H manual, there are "Market" classes and "Breed" classes, so she won't be being judged for meat the way I'm reading it. Very interesting about rooing them. I had never heard of that. So, a couple more questions...

1. Do you shear lambs? I know Shetlands are slower growing, so the first year I have my lamb (like if I get one this spring) will I need to shear (or roo) them or will they not produce enough wool by then?

2. Is trimming their hooves a hard thing to do or is it fairly simple?

3. Also, what fencing would be good? The horses have electric fencing that is several inches off the ground and Ashkat mentioned that the babies are rather small. Does electric fencing keep them in? I've heard it will not keep goats in, but I'm not sure if that's true. We do have some leftover horse fencing, we could probably use. Or what about "cattle" fencing?

4. About how many flakes a day would one eat? Even though we have pasture, it is limited and will mainly be used for the horses so I'd probably feed hay most of the year.

Thanks again for all the helpful information and the pics and websites!
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post #16 of 29 Old 01-25-2014, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by disastercupcake View Post
There are actually a bunch for sale in my area! Geez... I am the biggest gomer ever -.-

Is 100$ a reasonable price for a one year old ram? What about an ewe?

LOLOLOL

Depends if they are registered or not. Unregistered I sell wethers for $50 and ewes for $100+, registered you are looking at $150+. I am definitely cheap for my area, both for Shetlands and for sheep overall. I am also absurdly picky about who I sell too :P. Of course quality is a huge consideration. In this breed most quality animals are registered. Unregistered are usually culls from a registered herd/pets. It's not a breed where there are millions of them and registration is pretty much non existent, it's a very small population and the majority are registered and belong to breeding herds. While there are plenty of small time "breeders" (have <5 sheep, lambs now and then, etc) I would be wary of anyone that actually called themselves a breeder and had an unregistered flock.
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post #17 of 29 Old 01-25-2014, 07:44 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disastercupcake View Post
There are actually a bunch for sale in my area! Geez... I am the biggest gomer ever -.-

Is 100$ a reasonable price for a one year old ram? What about an ewe?
From what I've seen so far, $100 would be pretty cheap. I've called a couple of different breeders and $200-$300 seems to be the average around here. One breeder said anywhere from $125-$450 depending on quality. If you just wanted one for a pet, I'd think $100 would be a pretty good deal.
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post #18 of 29 Old 01-25-2014, 07:48 PM
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^xD That sheep looks a lil sad.

You can use wool for like... knitting, right? /Zexious is a dumb city girl

lol yes. You spin it and can do what you want. You can also felt it, though that is usually reserved for lousy fleeces. Shetland wool is renowned for it's quality and is much sought after by handspinners (think small time individuals doing it for fun). They make lots of VERY fancy things out of Shetland wool (on the Shetlands Islands, though of course people do here too), the standard being shawls that are so fine you can run them through a wedding ring. It (as all wool) is very warm, but can be very fine, so you can make lightweight sweaters. Google it :)

Shetland Knitwear: hand knitted traditional and contemporary knitwear > Products > Everest
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post #19 of 29 Old 01-25-2014, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by poundinghooves View Post
Thanks everybody! I appreciate all the great info! As far as I understand from reading the 4H manual, there are "Market" classes and "Breed" classes, so she won't be being judged for meat the way I'm reading it. Very interesting about rooing them. I had never heard of that. So, a couple more questions...

1. Do you shear lambs? I know Shetlands are slower growing, so the first year I have my lamb (like if I get one this spring) will I need to shear (or roo) them or will they not produce enough wool by then?
No. I would assume you would be getting one a few months old so it would be in the summer. You don't need to shear a baby. Shear for the first time as a yearling then again annually. If there is an issue you can shear out of cycle but there isn't really a reason to for the most part. I (my mother) did shear a lamb this year. Our shearer came very late (end of July? Don't remember) and it was VERY hot and we have a VERY fluffy lamb (several months old at that point) that he offered to shear and my mother said yes. I probably wouldn't of, but whatever. She is double coated (read-super long fast growing heavy fleece) and a few months later was once again longer than the other, non sheared lambs her age. The lamb fleece is the nicest and therefore the most valuable.

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2. Is trimming their hooves a hard thing to do or is it fairly simple?
I find it fairly easy. Sort of like dog nails. You can clearly see where you are supposed to cut. Of course it's better to do little more often if you aren't sure than go crazy and take too much off. Have someone show you and practice a lot, and you'll be good to go. You can buy special trimmers or use pruning shears provided they're sharp enough. I would suggest learning how to sit them down, though if you're getting one or two you could train them to pick up their feet (fronts are easy, backs not so much so I've never bothered).

Quote:
3. Also, what fencing would be good? The horses have electric fencing that is several inches off the ground and Ashkat mentioned that the babies are rather small. Does electric fencing keep them in? I've heard it will not keep goats in, but I'm not sure if that's true. We do have some leftover horse fencing, we could probably use. Or what about "cattle" fencing?
Depends on the electric. Sheep electric, yes. They do need to be trained to it and I would NOT use it for rams (horns) and personally would not use it unless supervised. Babies (little ones) will go right through it. Pictures of your fencing? I assume most of the fencing you're thinking of would not work. Zoom in on the bottom picture I posted to see what we have. Here's another pic (excuse the crappy pic, look at the fence :P)

It's (completely guessing) about 4 feet high (they jump, don't get a two foot fence!) and metal mesh say 2x4 inch rectangles. Again, guessing at numbers but to give you a general idea. We did use the same fencing for our goats. I would not use any other kind of fencing. Ours are kept in a relatively small area so fencing is important. We do have electric mesh as a portable fence. It works "ok" (if you make sure it's on which is a pain) and I would not consider it as a permanent fence. Definitely not in a small space or with lambs. Our fencing works well for how we use it. We have lambs and adults to keep in, and wild animals to keep out! (Speaking of which, ours are ALWAYS shut in at night due to predators, something to think about relative to your area). Shetlands are smart, independent, and agile, they will do what they want.

Quote:
4. About how many flakes a day would one eat? Even though we have pasture, it is limited and will mainly be used for the horses so I'd probably feed hay most of the year.

Thanks again for all the helpful information and the pics and websites!
Sounds like we are in the same boat as far as feeding goes. Obv the answer depends (as does the definition of flakes) but on average my adults get 1-2 (probably more like 1-11/2) depending on size. We do grain on occasion as we breed but if you are just having pets they shouldn't need it.
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post #20 of 29 Old 01-26-2014, 09:17 PM
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Rereading my post I wanted to make a point. A large part of the issue with electric is 90% of the sheep is invulnerable to electricity. Sounds funny but if the fence touches wool (most of the sheep!) the animal isn't going to feel anything. They basically need to touch their nose to get the point. (You may actually have a similar issue with a blanketed horse, picture that but worse)
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