Dog killed lamb
   

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Dog killed lamb

This is a discussion on Dog killed lamb within the Farm Forum forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • My dog kill my lamb
  • My dog has killed a lamb

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    04-25-2014, 09:01 AM
  #1
Weanling
Dog killed lamb

I need some advice. My daughter has two dogs at her farm. They both chase (and try to kill ) the cats. I toldher to really get after them, but usually they do it when no one is around. A fee days ago, a baby lamb was born. The dogs showed an intense amount of interest in it. It was in a barn stall so they couldn't get to it. Well, my husband bought a new horse, so they moved the sheep and her lamb to an enclosed pen inside the barn. Evidently somehow one of the dogs got in the pen and killed the lamb. I feel HORRIBLE because it was our fault they got moved. Anyway, can anything be done to change this dog? My dog let the lamb alone when told, and never tried to bother it. The second one of hers left it pretty much alone after numerous scoldings. The dog that killed it is new and just seemed obsessed. I don't think there's anyway to stop it's prey instinct and it probably doesn't belong on a farm, but If I know my daughter, gettinhg rid of the dog is not an option. It's great with the kids and the horses. Any possible suggestions as how to make this dog safe would be appreciated
     
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    04-25-2014, 09:32 AM
  #2
Foal
I grew up on a sheep ranch my whole life. Our working dogs were never ever left out always kenneled. The only dogs left out were our great Pyrenees. A dog that killed a lamb would be a dead dog. I'm not sure there is anything you can do besides keeping the dog kenneled and when its out watch it like a hawk.
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    04-25-2014, 09:33 AM
  #3
Showing
Professional training, and never let the dog have unsupervised access to any other animal. The dog has already killed, which means he's going to be harder to train than one who hasn't.
     
    04-25-2014, 09:41 AM
  #4
Weanling
Actually, I AM a professional trainer. Trained search and rescue, show ring and service dogs. I just don't know how this can realistically be done and was hoping one of you people with more experience with farm dogs might have a miracle suggestion
     
    04-25-2014, 10:05 AM
  #5
Showing
Nope, no miracles unfortunately. Only thing is to keep the dog away from any other farm animals.
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    04-25-2014, 02:14 PM
  #6
Showing
Now that the dog has killed, the only cure is a bullet and it's not your fault. It was up to your daughter to dog proof the fencing. What stopped her from locking the dogs up? So stop with the guilt trip.
     
    04-25-2014, 03:20 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Years ago, one of my dogs decided to go after chickens. I used intense adversion therapy with him and it did work (took its toll on me though as I felt like crap having to do it). It involved immediately keeping him under 24 hour control. When we went out into the yard he was on his leash and of course he immediately went for the chickens and then I immediately went after him (I really layed into him but I knew he had a strong personality and would otherwise blow off any less subtle reproaches). After a couple of times of this he smartened up but I wasn't finished yet. The next phase involved my husband herding the chickens in his direction and then even though he didn't react to them he still got into trouble big time. A couple of times of this and he was trying to get away from me in the opposite direction as soon as he saw the chickens. Next step was in the yard off leash but under supervision (by this time yelling at him only, everytime a chicken moved or clucked, without any physical contact was enough to send him hiding). Final step was he's back in the yard on his own and I'm watching him from the dining room window -- I knew it was a success when one day I watched him down by the barn catch sight of the chickens coming around the corner and he hightailed it back to the house at a gallop.

As a codicil to this, he was good with the chickens after that but decided he'd try his luck with the horses - it did not end well for him as one of the horses (after ample horse warning) kicked out one of his eyes. Only then did he give up all murderous schemes and lived a long, contented life.
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    04-25-2014, 03:22 PM
  #8
Banned
I think the dog needs put down if you are unable to control with a kennel.
Sorry for your loss.
     
    04-25-2014, 06:30 PM
  #9
Started
Coming from sheep country (the Shropshire - Welsh borders) I do know of one potential 'miracle' but it depends on the age and size of the dog.

If you have access to a grumpy old sod of a ram who weighs a ton more than the dog, then put the dog in with him. Remain to supervise obviously. Get the dog out after he has been beaten up, but before he sustains serious injury.

- harsh, but when the choice is between that and a bullet, most farmers I knew were willing to give the dog a chance.


Oh, one other suggestion. My dog used to have a go at my pigs through an electric fence. One time he lunged at the pig and got zapped by an electric fence on the nose. For ever after that he was convinced that pigs give electric shocks and would never go near one again.
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    04-25-2014, 06:50 PM
  #10
Showing
My chessie was as bull-headed as they come and he figured it was his job to go after the horses. He'd been used with dairy cattle prior. There was no way he'd call off so I bo't a shock collar. When I called Come, gave him a chance to respond then called again. If still no response he got a good shock. That got his attention and he responded when next I called Come. He also got a few treats. As long as he wore the collar he came when called and was rewarded. It took a month before the collar could be removed and by then he'd turn on a dime and race back to me. It took just the one shock. It was that or a bullet. Once we'd worked that out he became an incredible dog that took great pride in having a job and became a real asset. I never laid a hand on him to punish him but would fold my arms and look at the sky and snub him. Whatever he'd done wrong, he'd never repeat.
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