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Dog killing other animals

This is a discussion on Dog killing other animals within the Farm Forum forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

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        07-06-2014, 07:58 PM
      #21
    Yearling
    We had another thread about this recently:

    Neighbor's dogs killed our llama

    All dogs are carnivores, and need to be treated as such. No dog over the size of a rat should be left to roam unsupervised. The dog needs to be securely confined or leashed when you aren't working with him - and you need to work with him for several hours a day to keep him happy as he is a working breed. If you don't have time for that, re-home him to a suitable home aware of and ready to deal with the problems you've had. No necessity for euthanasia.
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        07-06-2014, 10:22 PM
      #22
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sharpie    
    My apologies- I really did not intend to be demeaning at all. Tone vs the internet and all that. I really do agree that euthanasia is a valid consideration and I would not blame anyone for going down that route, just like with any potentially dangerous habit (bucking, kicking, rearing, etc in a horse would rank equal in my mind) But for MY OWN part, I would not euthanize this dog without attempting to retrain and rehome first, nor would I, personally, recommend anyone else do so. Neither would I condemn them for it either. To my mind, it's just a bit of a big jump for something that might not need so final a solution. Now, if the dog had other issues the OP had shared, I might be quicker to go there.
    If there was more competent owners like you I would have no problem saying go ahead and rehome. But the average dog owner would not know how to handle this dog correctly. Of course it is a personal decision not to take the risk, so the OP must decide what she wants to do and is personally ok with.
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        07-06-2014, 11:44 PM
      #23
    Green Broke
    Squirrelfood--So, you think that because a certain percentage of owners are unable to keep their animals on their own property (a very simple task), the animal should be euthanized?

    EDIT--Also, Sullys... You say that this animal has really serious vices, and I'd agree with you. But, OP has said the dog is not at all aggressive toward people. So would this situation not be remedied, like I suggested earlier, by rehoming her somewhere to people who have no plans to get another animal?
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        07-07-2014, 12:42 AM
      #24
    Foal
    I vote for searching for a rescue that has been around awhile, a rescue that has the best chance to find that home and/or rehab.
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        07-07-2014, 06:24 AM
      #25
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SullysRider    
    If there was more competent owners like you I would have no problem saying go ahead and rehome. But the average dog owner would not know how to handle this dog correctly. Of course it is a personal decision not to take the risk, so the OP must decide what she wants to do and is personally ok with.
    SR, I was just thinking you may be interested in what's going on in dog adoption in Australia. The RSPCA and some other shelters have on the whole stopped dealing with easily bored, high-exercise requirement working breeds, and are transferring them to special re-homing centres for working dogs. We got our Kelpie cross from such a centre a year ago and were very impressed with their set-up. They operate out of a farm and try their rescues on all manner of other animals - other dogs, cats, chicken, cattle, sheep and donkeys - and have individual dogs' behaviour around them on their database, and it plays a role in how they match up dogs and new owners, kind of like a dating agency. Basically, although with special care you can keep breeds like that happy in suburban homes, they are generally more suited to farms where they will actually be working with animals. Dogs like that go around the twist if they don't get enough exercise and teamwork (but not usually irreversibly). By the way, do you ever see Australian Kelpies in the US?
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        07-07-2014, 11:30 AM
      #26
    Yearling
    I have a friend in Tx that has a pair of kelpies and a pair of border collies. She uses the kelpies on her goats and the border collies on the cattle. It sounds like they have a great system set up. We have one of our Pyrenees mixes because she couldn't cope in a small suburban yard with limited time on a leash. We've had her for several months and the mix personality is dominant. She is leash only when the chickens are loose and their time out is now more limited. She is supervised off leash and does not leave the property. Likely this will be for the way it is for her lifetime. With as focused as she is there is no doubt she'd kill any other small animal she caught.
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        07-07-2014, 12:02 PM
      #27
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zexious    
    Squirrelfood--So, you think that because a certain percentage of owners are unable to keep their animals on their own property (a very simple task), the animal should be euthanized?

    EDIT--Also, Sullys... You say that this animal has really serious vices, and I'd agree with you. But, OP has said the dog is not at all aggressive toward people. So would this situation not be remedied, like I suggested earlier, by rehoming her somewhere to people who have no plans to get another animal?
    The only problem with that is that the owner would still have to work with the animal on this. Even if you rehome to a home where there is no other animals it is impossible to keep the dog away from other animals it's whole life. What if a family member wants to come over but can only do so if there small dog comes because they can't find a sitter? What if the dog is in the backyard and a cat decides to go back there and doesn't make it back over the fence fast enough? What if a neighbor's chicken wanders into the backyard (they will go over fences). That's why I say this dog needs a competent owner who knows how to deal with this. There is no feasible way to keep a dog from other animals. Something will happen.
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        07-07-2014, 12:07 PM
      #28
    Green Broke
    You have already trained her to wander and then hunt and kill prey. My dog, "Rose" kills rabbits but it's on our property. She is 1/2 Husky, and I read that Husky's will kill cats is they are not raised to see them as part of the pack. We got her at 8 weeks old and raised her with the cats. I had a bad experience with a shelter GS that was 6 mo when I took him home (on a Friday--DON'T EVER DO THIS!!!). He loved people but tried to kill two of my cats, and attacked my horse, "Corporal" (1982-2009, RIP) IN HIS STALL!!
    He got crated and taken back to the shelter on Monday. This young dog has been ruined, and you have ruined yours through neglect. We lost 6 cats in 2013, and we thought it was bc of coyotes. One was bc of a neighbor's dog. I should have gotten up at 5am and let our 12 yo female cat, "Favorite". I found her two front legs strewn about later the same morning. Coyotes, or the dead Bobcat that somebody found in a building up the street, would have carried off the carcass and we would have had nothing left. There was a neighbor's dog who was wandering. This was becoming an everyday occurance and my dog, "Pyg" was alerting me--she doesn't warm up quickly to other dogs. The day after I found parts of my sweet cat, I never saw this dog again. Presumably he took home the rest of my cat. DH said if he ever saw this dog on our 5 acres again, the dog would take home a .22 in his back side. Another person might decide to put a .38 in that dog's head. Such could be the outcome for you.
    Dogs can wander much further from home than you think. If your dog kills somebody's cat or somebody's small dog, they're going to be Very Angry. If they catch wind that YOUR dog has a bad habit of wandering and hunting, they'll be at your door.
         
        07-07-2014, 12:08 PM
      #29
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SueC    
    SR, I was just thinking you may be interested in what's going on in dog adoption in Australia. The RSPCA and some other shelters have on the whole stopped dealing with easily bored, high-exercise requirement working breeds, and are transferring them to special re-homing centres for working dogs. We got our Kelpie cross from such a centre a year ago and were very impressed with their set-up. They operate out of a farm and try their rescues on all manner of other animals - other dogs, cats, chicken, cattle, sheep and donkeys - and have individual dogs' behaviour around them on their database, and it plays a role in how they match up dogs and new owners, kind of like a dating agency. Basically, although with special care you can keep breeds like that happy in suburban homes, they are generally more suited to farms where they will actually be working with animals. Dogs like that go around the twist if they don't get enough exercise and teamwork (but not usually irreversibly). By the way, do you ever see Australian Kelpies in the US?
    I wish we had more rescues like that, we do have breed specific rescues, but none set up quite so nice as that. I live near the HSPCA which is a huge rescue operation. And they do some screening but not quite enough to keep dogs from getting returned a lot. The breed specific rescues I work with work off of foster homes. So breed lovers who have one themselves will open their homes to another dog until the dog can be placed. I have/train hunting dogs and I could not imagine having one and not doing what it is bred to do and not letting them get their energy out. They turn destructive and uncontrollable quickly that way. And I personally have seen Kelpies, farmer and rancher friends of mine have some. They're definitely not a dog you would want to have if you didn't have a place/job to get their energy needs and drive met.
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        07-07-2014, 12:16 PM
      #30
    Green Broke
    Sullys--Maybe that is true in a rural setting, but such incidents are not nearly as common elsewhere. That's not to say the ideal situation wouldn't be with someone who can get to the root of this issue, and potentially cure it indefinitely; that would be great.

    But the instances you gave really don't apply to other living situations. There are no chickens in many suburbs or urban areas--they are against the zoning ordinances. Stray cats aren't really an issue either (at least, not where I live). I see maybe one a month, and they would be in far more danger of getting snatched up by an owl or a coyote than being dumb enough to wander into the backyard of a snarling dog.
    Finally, if someone with a small dog wants to visit... the answer would have to be no for the safety of the dog xD I always thought bringing animals to someone else's home was rude, personally...

    I'm just saying. There are other options. It's not as impossible as everyone seems to think.
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