Hay Issues - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Barns, Boarding, and Farms > Farm Forum

Hay Issues

This is a discussion on Hay Issues within the Farm Forum forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • Hay rakes into a line
  • How long after hay has been baled should it sit before moving

Like Tree15Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-31-2012, 11:28 AM
  #11
Started
My kids and I can pick up 50 bales from behind the baler in about 30 minutes, that's stacking on te trailer and all. I'm a very petite woman and the kids are preteen...so as long as your back is strong an spirit willing it's easy.
We pick up from behind the baler from a friend, he cuts, fluffs a few times in the following week then bales. I stack them in the barn which is huge and move them around during the coming months a few times to make sure there aren't nice infestations going on. Never have mold or heat.
Posted via Mobile Device
mammakatja likes this.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-31-2012, 11:35 AM
  #12
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallee    
2 things we need to know in this situation. One is the hay going to be square baled or round? 2. Has the hay been properly dried after cutting?(as in set in a dry field after being cut for about a week?)
I do no understand why it is important to note square or round bales? Drying time is drying time. Strong sun and a good breeze on a wide winrow will dry the hay quickly. Thick cut grass on a low ground will dry more slowly. If chemicals are applied, the hay can be baled fairly quickly after cutting. Many factors to consider.

But bottom line - the baled hay should not have to sit prior to storage. After it's baled - it's not going to dry anymore.
     
    05-31-2012, 04:22 PM
  #13
Weanling
We just finished baling our 10 acre field. We cut last Sunday, raked Memorial weekend Saturday and baled Monday. (Could have done it in less time but hubby works nights on back end of the week) We ended up with 301 bales!!! Woohoo! I'm in TX and lost all my hay in a barn fire last fall so stacking these bales was MORE than fun this time around. I had my 15 year old son and his 16 year old buddy. We brought in and stacked all 301 bales on Memorial Day Monday. Still had day light to spare for hamburgers. God is good!!!!!! :)
Corporal and Wallee like this.
     
    05-31-2012, 04:27 PM
  #14
Started
I love my hay guy! He can load ten bales at a time on my flatbed and I'm on the road home within minutes! I do have to unload, but I'd rather do that than load.
     
    05-31-2012, 04:39 PM
  #15
Green Broke
From someone who has been window-shopping balers, I can tell you that you have to have machinery to get in this much hay. You need at LEAST a 5 day window to properly cure the hay by turning often,drying in the sun, and grabbing the grass into flakes, then bales. Most balers that pull behind a tractor will tie up and stack 15 bales at a time.
Here is some perspective for you to consider.
Last year I bought a field+ of 165 bales. I put 30 bales on my truck one evening, then picked up and emptied into my loft 135 bales the next day. I did this ALONE. I don't know how I did it, but it was too much for me to do again soon. I COULD do that much again with help. This hay was on about 4 acres--could have been 3--and was 5 miles from my house. The cost was right, but this accounted for MY labor instead of the sellers.
I have been stacking my own hay for 12 years now, so this isn't the first time. Can you hire someone to do this? I would.
     
    05-31-2012, 05:08 PM
  #16
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
I do no understand why it is important to note square or round bales? Drying time is drying time. Strong sun and a good breeze on a wide winrow will dry the hay quickly. Thick cut grass on a low ground will dry more slowly. If chemicals are applied, the hay can be baled fairly quickly after cutting. Many factors to consider.

But bottom line - the baled hay should not have to sit prior to storage. After it's baled - it's not going to dry anymore.

Reason I asked how it would be bailed(round or square) is because I wanted to know if they planed on having equipment to pick up the bales if they were doing round where as if they were doing square they could just pick up by hand. I wasnt refering to dry time with that.
     
    05-31-2012, 07:42 PM
  #17
Green Broke
Glad to hear so many of you are getting in your hay-sounds like it is a good year?
     
    05-31-2012, 07:49 PM
  #18
Weanling
Thought y'all might get a kick out of one of our "pieces of equipment". I didn't get a pic of hubby cutting, but this is me raking. I have 6 kiddos so this is my mama-mobile. It's a diesel and hubby converted it into a 4 wheel drive so it also serves as our farm truck when the pto on the tractor is not needed. Hey you know, the younger kids were in there watching a movie, I had shade and a/c...what more could a housewife/mother/farm girl want?
hay rake 010.jpg

And this is hubby baling. It's an old square baler that we nursed back to health, but you know for something that's probably over 30 years old, it sure does the job. Just keep the grease coming and be sure everything is overhauled before each cut.
Hay baler 009.jpg
     
    06-02-2012, 12:30 AM
  #19
Weanling
By the way Sophie19, how did it go?
     
    06-06-2012, 09:58 AM
  #20
Weanling
Red face

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophie19    
The property owner where I keep my horse is having hay cut tomorrow. I have read that you need to let the bales sit for a while before you store them to let them dry out. How long do they need to sit?

Also it is a very big pasture. It's probably about 40 acres. I don't own a truck, but am planning to rent one to bring in the hay. Is this to big of a job for just me and my husband to conquer by ourselves?
If I'm reading your ?? Correctly there seems to be a bit of confusion. Hay cut, raked, & baled properly is usually "dry." However, to cure totally properly it should not be fed immediately..letting it sit 4-6 weeks allows a curing process to happen. However, where I live it is extremely difficult to do that since hay stores are pretty much used up quickly..and hay that sits too long.(last year's hay) will lose nutritional value. As far as loading from the field...usually people sell much cheaper because they don't have to load, haul, and store. But, it is a lot of work. 60 -70 lb bale chucking is exhausting & it is much easier if the driver can stay in the vehicle since you are constantly moving...I would recommend more help for the 2 of you!
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Knee issues = balance issues... need some help! Britt Rider Wellness 12 04-14-2012 10:44 AM
Health Issues Before Training Issues. ChingazMyBoy Horse Training 9 09-12-2011 10:46 PM
Issues after Issues....Going to get lessons. Gidget Horse Training 1 06-17-2010 08:38 PM
I have many issues... LOL Nita English Riding 12 08-05-2009 07:58 PM
help with leg issues jwhisperj Horse Training 0 10-23-2007 06:35 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0