How does your garden grow? - Page 26
   

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How does your garden grow?

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    03-24-2013, 01:08 AM
  #251
Weanling
This was my first year growing a garden (well, growing anything actually! My first attempt ever.), I got peas, herbs and beans, all in large pots (so I don't have to weed so much, HA!)

The peas are doing great. I have been getting a weird fascination with turning the pot and timing how long it takes them to change direction (they are aways twisting towards the light) but the bean looks kinda funny. It continues to die, then regrow, then die. Yet to get any produce out of either.

The herbs (some kinda of fancy basil), on the other hand, has been growing flat out and smells Delicious! Hopefully next year will be a touch more productive.
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    03-24-2013, 10:25 AM
  #252
Super Moderator
Grrr, It snowed every single day for the past ten days and they are calling for snow every single day this coming week so I have been somewhat avoiding this thread.

Potatoes- I do them too. I like Kennebecs, Yukon Golds, and Reds. I think I posted a pic somewhere of the yeilds last year... the Idahos were pitiful so I won't do them again, but I did buy some fancy purple/blue ones to try this year.

I've also leaned my lesson from doing them the "traditional way." Nope... not again.
Now I do a modified mulch and box system. My pc crashed last month and all my pics are off of here or I would post how I do the boxes.
But basically I put out boxes that are shiny on the poutside (they last longer) with the bottom flaps spread out like feet. I put bricks on the feet too because it gets windy here.
Then I put the spudlings in the bottom, cover with a few inches of soil/compost, then pile on the straw/bedding/shredded paper/mulch type materials at the appropriate intervals until the plants turn brown in the early fall.
Rip open the sides of the box and bingo...we got taters.

I also have a section of the garden that is somewhat of a raised bed with wood sides and I rotate the spuds through there as well. I pull the soft dirt aside, plant and cover with a few to 6 inches of soil, then pile on the mulches. In late summer/fall I rake off the mulch and dig my hands through the soft soil (kiddo likes doing it too) like a treasure hunt.

No more trenches for me.
But... the good thing about trenches is that they often survive the winter here and I continue to get harvests for years. Gotta dig them up though.
     
    03-24-2013, 12:35 PM
  #253
Yearling
Re: potatoes; I have heard people do them in wooden barrels or plastic drum barrels. Anyone tried that? I'm debating trying but since I'm getting everything else up and running from scratch this year in the new house, it might be something I save for next year.

Another thing I don't think I read anyone mention in this thread- beans for drying (i.e., kidney's, turtles, canellini's). I always do snap beans, but we eat so many dried beans all winter, I was contemplating trying some of those too. I've read there's a pretty specific window that you have to get them off the plant, and I'm not sure about the process for drying. Anyone have any thoughts?

I just ordered a bunch of seeds this morning, which I know probably sounds late to most of you- but, given that there is still a solid foot of snow on the ground (thanks to yet another storm last week), I don't think anything's going into the ground any time soon, and I mostly like to do direct sowing. So I am living vicariously through all of you for now :)
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    04-06-2013, 11:16 AM
  #254
Green Broke
I have about 20 people coming to my house today to have a garden tour. I have not done a thing to it. I have been working all morning preparing the raised beds for seed planting. I have 2.5 yards of garden soil/compost mix in the back of the truck, that did not get unloaded. I think I might give everyone some seed potatoes and say plant them. I don't know why I said I would do this, I should have most all of my cool season crops in the ground and up by now. I hope they are not disappointed.

I guess they can see how the beds are made and what my soil recipe is.

I do this because I need so many hours of instruction or volenteer work to keep my Master Gardener certificate up to date. I always told clients and customers that I had a degree in Horticulture. They would then ask, But are you a master gardener?
I would say, no but I graduated with a degree in horticulture, and am a certified arborist. They would say, But are you a Master Gardener? I got sick of it and took the course to become a master gardener. Now when asked I can say Yes!
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    04-10-2013, 09:37 AM
  #255
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taffy Clayton    
I have about 20 people coming to my house today to have a garden tour. I have not done a thing to it. I have been working all morning preparing the raised beds for seed planting. I have 2.5 yards of garden soil/compost mix in the back of the truck, that did not get unloaded. I think I might give everyone some seed potatoes and say plant them. I don't know why I said I would do this, I should have most all of my cool season crops in the ground and up by now. I hope they are not disappointed.

I guess they can see how the beds are made and what my soil recipe is.

I do this because I need so many hours of instruction or volenteer work to keep my Master Gardener certificate up to date. I always told clients and customers that I had a degree in Horticulture. They would then ask, But are you a master gardener?
I would say, no but I graduated with a degree in horticulture, and am a certified arborist. They would say, But are you a Master Gardener? I got sick of it and took the course to become a master gardener. Now when asked I can say Yes!
LOL, I've learned very well to say no, and to say it often.

Master Gardener...Hmmm.... we have a program here and I have been thinking of taking it.
Aside from your degrees, did you find it really useful in terms of information? Would you do it again? Did it benefit you/your garden, or did it more or less prepare you to help others instead?
I realize I'll probably get something different out of it because my knowledge is only self taught thus far, but I'm wondering if it's a good place to start in working towards something certifiable, or to add to my degree.
     
    04-10-2013, 09:57 AM
  #256
Yearling
I started my garden again, I have 50 brandywine (multicolored ones for fun) seedlings inside, garlic, peas and rubarb started outside. And will be planting onions, potatos (in plastic drums), corns, beans and peas. My little sister is planting baby carrots and spinch for our guinea pigs in window boxes.
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    04-10-2013, 07:58 PM
  #257
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lockwood    
LOL, I've learned very well to say no, and to say it often.

Master Gardener...Hmmm.... we have a program here and I have been thinking of taking it.
Aside from your degrees, did you find it really useful in terms of information? Would you do it again? Did it benefit you/your garden, or did it more or less prepare you to help others instead?
I realize I'll probably get something different out of it because my knowledge is only self taught thus far, but I'm wondering if it's a good place to start in working towards something certifiable, or to add to my degree.
Yes I would recommend Taking the Master gardener classes. My county is one of the smallest in the state with limited resources and personel. The reason why it was such a joke in my case was because I took the second offering of the MG classes in my county. So what happened in my case is the first group of MG grads taught the second group of MG, (me). And it was a total joke, they just read the power points to us. The power points that were someone else's presentation, I think it was the first time they even looked at the presentation. If someone asked a question, they had no idea what the answer was, and this was done in about 8 presentations out of the eleven needed for the MG program.

That said I think it is a very good program and well worth taking. The book alone was worth 3/4 the enrollment fee.

I was kind of making fun because so many people thought being a MG was more advanced than a degree. But you will learn lots of stuff, like how water moves through different layers of soil. It is facinating.
There was:
landscaping
Soils
Plant identification
Roots
Seed starting
Veggie garening
Tree planting
Integrated pest management
Fertilization
Pruning
Just to name a few.

You will really learn a lot
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    04-10-2013, 08:10 PM
  #258
Showing
My mom works for our extension office and she did the MG class a few years ago. I love the resource material she got with it. I frequently reference her big binder.

Any thoughts on good plants for my new fish/garden pond? I think I want a hardy lily of some sort and planned to have a bit of water lettuce for the fish. Other than that would like to use semi and submerged pots. Here is the most recent shot of my pond in progress. The yard around will become stone patio. I plan to put 2 big potted ferns on either side of the filter box to help hide it.
IMAG1311.jpg
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    04-10-2013, 08:15 PM
  #259
Started
I'll be starting a vegetable garden this year. Mainly tomatoes, peppers, (perhaps cukes) and lots of herbs. Any tips so that my first year is successful? I've been reading a lot on what to do but any advice from experienced gardeners would be great! Also, is 3 hours of strong sun (like it's really hot because the plot is next to a wall so it becomes quite hot and dry quickly) and then 2 hours of lighter sun enough for tomatoes to grow happily? :/
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    04-10-2013, 09:56 PM
  #260
Super Moderator
Thanks Taffy! That actually helps alot.

MHF- Ferns, ferns, ferns!
Oh.. you already said ferns?? Well I'm fresh out of ideas besides water lilies. I'm not familiar with water plants beyond ferns ans water lilies.

Hidalgo, I've had luck in my area with growing tomatoes in semi shady areas while still getting nice tomatoes. My first thought though is... if this wall is a building, then I wonder if the soil might be a little too alkaline. I don't know if tomatoes do ok in alkaline soil (maybe Taffy does) but foundation plantings or things near bricks, stones, and concrete usually have to be able to tolerate alkaline soil from those locations.
     

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