Leaving the city behind ... and freaking out a tad - Page 4
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Barns, Boarding, and Farms > Farm Forum

Leaving the city behind ... and freaking out a tad

This is a discussion on Leaving the city behind ... and freaking out a tad within the Farm Forum forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

    Like Tree87Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        02-19-2013, 05:10 PM
      #31
    Yearling
    LOL - that's when giving directions sounds like:

    Now when you get to the black barking dog, turn left - he'll chase you a bit but he never goes past the third driveway - which, by the way, is when you need to start looking for a run down barn and an old tree - when you see them, make another left. Go one more mile just past the old man sitting on the porch, and our house is first on the right. LOL! That was real directions given to me by a friend who lives in a little community out in the middle of nowhere here in TX....haha!
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        02-19-2013, 06:36 PM
      #32
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PilatesGal    
    I definitely want to have a garden, but have been told I pretty much need to put an 8-foot high fence all around it to keep the deer out. I'll need to, as I'm transferring some of my heritage raspberry plants and they HAVE to survive Hubby is planning out a moveable chicken coop in his spare time - yay!

    Shropshirerosie ... I'd love to read your blog - where can I find it?
    ...
    The deer don't come near our raspberry plants (or anything else for that matter) because of our two big deer-chasing dogs. I was worried that the dogs would run off chasing the deer, but actually they never leave our perimeter. Once they'd been 'shown' where is ours, and where the boundary is the dogs never stray out and the deer never venture in.

    Canada Bound - of family, dogs and horses
    Ummm follow this link I think . It's in Members Journals
         
        02-19-2013, 10:36 PM
      #33
    Foal
    Found it - thanks! Guess what I'll be doing for a chunk of tomorrow I am a reading fiend.
         
        02-20-2013, 12:38 PM
      #34
    Trained
    Congrats PG! You won't regret it!

    I Lol'ed at giving directions! Mine are "Go 7 miles south after you turn at the fork in the road, watch for a clearing with a pond and a red gate, after that there is a steep hill and to your right there's a shot up stop sign laying crooked across the ditch, turn there and..." !!

    Why we moved...
    8 years ago we lived in a booming city, brand spankin new custom 2,500 sq ft home with a heated three car garage, 5 mins from the grocery stores and new restaurants, and had promising careers. I did have a 5 acre pasture for my horses, but all the land around us was being turned into sub divisions and the once quiet roads I grew up on turned into a cruise strip for the bikers visiting the new Harley dealership built down the road. One night when I was pregnant a drunk driver hit our house going 45 mph, right beside my bed.
    That sealed the deal, we were out of there!!! I have family that grew up out in the country, I'm a hillbilly at heart, but had no real knowledge of how to farm or live out in the wilderness...

    So we moved to the middle of nowhere surrounded by the National Forest, about an hour and a half from any city.
    First turned an old well house into a 1 room 400 sq ft cabin. It was down on the river and a little piece of paradise... Until we flooded several times and had several AM visitors come up from the river trying to "borrow" our cars, etc...
    We had added on, built HUGE gardens, nice fences, patios, etc but I couldn't handle living in a flood plain where we had 6 100 year floods within a span of 2 years!

    So we found a small mountain farm, elevation 2,500 ft! (even further from civilization!) No more floods for us!
    Took us a year to rehab our house that hadn't been lived in in 10 years, are still working on the grounds and the barns... We're getting there! It was started in 1900 by two brothers who raised tomatoes. So we have some great historical coos like hand dug wells, rock fences, native stone fireplaces, and a great old horse barn. Only 20ish acres of pasture but 60 other acres of forest with miles of trails winding around them and two waterfalls at the bottom. Lots of wildlife, I've seen bear, turkey and their tiny chicks, deer, you name it! I love love love this place!

    Some of the pros...

    Gardens!!! Oh I love raising my own food, still have so much to learn!
    No neighbors. Closest people are over 4 miles away.
    Fresh air! Which can be a con because all I want to do is sit on the balcony drinking tea/wine and read books!
    Not worrying about visiting friends/relatives, LOL!! They call days in advance now! I used to get so frustrated with people popping in at random times.
    Chickens! I've always had chickens but could never free range, or have a rooster, so now I have 19 and am expanding into Turkeys and hoping to get some guineas soon. Lots of fresh eggs!
    (GREAT idea for the chicken tractor! I had one and loved it.)
    Hunting, you may not like game... But we really enjoy putting up fresh venison, so healthy!
    The people out here are great! Mostly people like us now that have gotten out of town. Some moved out here in the 70's, others more recently from as far as Great Britain and California... We have the best parties! I've become great friends with the "old timers", they pop in and have coffee or we meet down at the gas station/snack shack (18 miles away) and swap stories! I've learned so much from them, one even gave me a colt.

    Cons... I hate to complain, really these aren't bad but you should know.

    If you're exhausted you still have to cook! No running to grab a quick dinner!
    You have to plan. I only go to the big city once every two weeks for groceries. There are a few essentials at the gas station and in the small town 30 miles away, but the prices are astronomical and poor quality.
    Schools... Our daughter is only 7. She goes to private in the small town. Thankfully DH has a brother with a kid so we car pool. Takes an hour and a half to get there and back.
    Gas... Funny having to drive 18 miles to fill up your car! But only a little bit because it's super high so we get enough to get to town where it's slightly lower.
    Purchasing and maintaining equipment. For us it was a struggle because it wasn't like we could call Joe Schmoe to come out and brush hog. Appliance stores won't come out this far to deliver or pick up broken appliances/equipment for repair.

    Tips! What for me is necessary for living way out.

    Big Dogs. I love the feeling of security, and they have done a great job protecting me on multiple occasions.
    Get a mid sized SUV! Must have an SUV with 4 wheel drive that gets decent gas mileage. We had a big new diesel but with gas so high, and having to haul groceries/feed/stuff in the rain, even with a bed cover an SUV has been so much better for us!
    Get Vonage! Or whatever satellite phone service you have up there. A regular land line with only 100 minuets of long distance (ummm every call is long distance out here, LOL!!) ran around $120 a month! Way more when of course I went over! We do have spotty random cell service up high.
    Wood fireplaces for heat. You can't count on electric.
    Are you on a well? Get it checked, test it for production and put in water storage tanks. If it goes out you could wait quite a while for a repairman.
    Love our Ranger, we use it for something almost every day.
    Look for Air Evac services in your area. We pay $150 a year for helicopter first response/medical. It could be hours for a Ambulance to get to us.
    Be prepared. Have as much first aid on hand as possible.

    I'll think of more... Can't wait to hear about your adventures!
    My friends think I'm absolutely mad for living out here, but I think they're crazy for staying in town! I really hope you enjoy it!
         
        02-20-2013, 03:26 PM
      #35
    Showing
    An acreage.......welcome to the land of never ending work. If it doesn't need building it needs fixing and if it doesn't need fixing it needs paint. And there will be days when the weather prevents all of the above so that's when you catch up on everything that was neglected in the house. The old expression "make hay while the sun shines" applies to everything on a farm, not just hay. If you don't have a hay shed, build one as tarping hay promotes rapid mold growth. Make it bigger than you think you will need as the space is never wasted. That is a priority if you are bringing your horses home. BTW, always secure your hay source a month before haying starts. Farmers like to know in advance if the crop will be sold. You might even want one who will bring in 200 bales at a time. Your hay supplier is your best ally.
    Corporal and PilatesGal like this.
         
        02-21-2013, 05:12 PM
      #36
    Yearling
    Congrats to you! We're trying so hard to get where you are. I was raised on a farm & moved to town when I got married. It only took me a few years to stop going to the window & looking every time I heard a car! LOL
    PilatesGal likes this.
         
        02-21-2013, 06:00 PM
      #37
    Foal
    Had a hoot of a day shopping (and I HATE shopping) today. Muck buckets, blanket racks, bridle hooks, salt blocks ... I'm sure there's more, but that's all I can remember for now. Yesterday was spent arranging to have a murphy bed built (seriously - who makes a bedroom 7'x9'???) and buying countless organizational/storage units. Next week I start sourcing out hay and trying to find a donkey.

    I told our barn owner yesterday - she was very supportive. Yay!

    Yes, I'm spinning a little. And on top of all of this my 104-yr old grandmother has taken a turn for the worse so I'm making daily trips to see her as well. I'm going to get pretty good at organizing my time, that's for sure!

    Thanks for all the fantastic support and advice. I can't get over how much I'm learning! Can't wait to actually move in
    Corporal likes this.
         
        02-22-2013, 02:15 AM
      #38
    Foal
    PilatesGal, good luck on your move!

    I feel like I know you! I too live in Calgary, My mother runs triathlons (Ironman), and your display photo looks very much like a team of horses we had at the ranch camp I worked at... haha, which also backed on to wonderful crown land near Cochrane.

    Anyways, I am so, so jealous that you get to experience the "country-life", I bet within a couple months (and perhaps after surviving your first winter), you'll see yourself as a country-girl!
    PilatesGal likes this.
         
        04-22-2013, 08:54 PM
      #39
    Foal
    When you start looking for a donkey be conscious about if its a jack or jenny. Jacks can be more aggressive. A lot of people will put a donkey with their cattle to protect the babies but I have heard of jacks attacking and sometimes killing those babies. (This is not true for all jacks. Some are just as sweet and each individual animals personality varies) Jennys tend to be easier to handle. At least from what I have seen. A Jenny will also help with some wildlife around here they keep the coyotes away. :) good luck, congrats, and sorry about your granny getting sick
         
        04-22-2013, 09:21 PM
      #40
    Showing
    Updates??
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Freaking!! mbender Horse Health 19 05-03-2011 01:14 PM
    Freaking Out!!!!!.... Please help Velvetgrace Horse Health 10 12-21-2008 11:35 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:37 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0