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? on seeding pasture and maintenance

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        05-16-2014, 12:33 AM
      #11
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GracielaGata    
    ... So there really isn't much chance of them pulling roots out? When we take them out to ride, and let them graze there, it is all established, and they pull out probably 50% of the roots in what they grab. ...
    I assume you mean some place other than your pasture when you are riding??? It's entirely possible they can pull up roots where seed has naturally fallen on unprepared (or native) soil and a plant started up - the seed essentially started on top of the dirt, can't get a really deep root system going and is more likely to pop out of the ground when grabbed by horse teeth (that's the advantage of cultivation in that it helps put seeds in at the proper depth and loosens the soil to let the roots get deeper quickly).
         
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        05-16-2014, 12:39 AM
      #12
    Trained
    Dryland pasture mix is for seeding areas that you can't irrigate when you seed it, sure it helps if you do, or if it rains after you seed, but it's hardy stuff, it will germinate without watering it. My lawn is dryland pasture mix, I will sometimes turn on the sprinklers for it. I find it a big waste of fresh water to grow a lawn only to cut it, but I was having a gift opening/barbeque for the day after my daughter's wedding, I thought this is only going to happen once, go for it.
         
        05-16-2014, 09:01 AM
      #13
    Started
    It's hard not to get impatient and start grazing a newly planted pasture when it's 18" or more. What you aren't seeing, the establishment of roots, is more important. You just overseeded so your root system is very shallow at this point. The roots need to be 2X the height of the plant in sandy soil. It's time to put down a good fertilizer to feed the roots. Look for something with a good P value and moderate N. (N for tops, P for roots and K for both). I would let the plant go to seed. Let it drop the seeds and overseed the pasture even more. Graze it late fall. All that tall growth will not mess up next years growth. It will help protect the plants from the cold, it will help hold soil and snow will get trapped so it won't blow away and help prevent winterkill.
    karliejaye likes this.
         
        06-05-2014, 03:49 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Mow it down to 6 inches. Then mow it again after 2 weeks. Once it's been able to be mowed a few times it should have a good enough root system to have the horses back on it. To make sure just pull on some strands and if it's hard to pull out the roots, your good to go. Make sure you rotate your pastures when they've been eaten down to 3 inches tall and don't let them back on until it's reached 6 to 8 inches. Should only take about 2 or 3 weeks. If it's the only pasture you have to put them on, divide into 3 sections so one is being grazed while one is being mowed and the third is being rested. You'll get more use out of a smaller space doing it this way and they won't be overgrazing. It also helps force them to graze evenly instead of over grazing in some spots and leaving others untouched. I've been able to keep 2 horses per acre using rotational grazing like this. In September, you need to make sure to fertilize and lime your pastures according to what your soil test says. This way you'll have great pastures in the spring when you put the horses back on it
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        06-05-2014, 04:25 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Chevaux    
    I assume you mean some place other than your pasture when you are riding??? It's entirely possible they can pull up roots where seed has naturally fallen on unprepared (or native) soil and a plant started up - the seed essentially started on top of the dirt, can't get a really deep root system going and is more likely to pop out of the ground when grabbed by horse teeth (that's the advantage of cultivation in that it helps put seeds in at the proper depth and loosens the soil to let the roots get deeper quickly).
    Sorry I never replied! Actually, I did, but it must have timed out, and I got busy and didn't realize! :) Yep, some place not in our property line. I can't be positive, but they don't seem to be on the surface, just a super weak to pulling variety. We also have a variety of this in our property, though not the main pastures. We temp fenced them into a spot to graze, and they pulled out nearly everything, then just spit it out, as they seem to hate that type, or hate that the roots come too (the more likely reason).

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by waresbear    
    Dryland pasture mix is for seeding areas that you can't irrigate when you seed it, sure it helps if you do, or if it rains after you seed, but it's hardy stuff, it will germinate without watering it. My lawn is dryland pasture mix, I will sometimes turn on the sprinklers for it. I find it a big waste of fresh water to grow a lawn only to cut it, but I was having a gift opening/barbeque for the day after my daughter's wedding, I thought this is only going to happen once, go for it.
    Yep, dryland. :) I just haven't found any info on how to care for it in pasture settings, aside from don't let them graze it/on it for 2 years.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Left Hand Percherons    
    It's hard not to get impatient and start grazing a newly planted pasture when it's 18" or more. What you aren't seeing, the establishment of roots, is more important. You just overseeded so your root system is very shallow at this point. The roots need to be 2X the height of the plant in sandy soil. It's time to put down a good fertilizer to feed the roots. Look for something with a good P value and moderate N. (N for tops, P for roots and K for both). I would let the plant go to seed. Let it drop the seeds and overseed the pasture even more. Graze it late fall. All that tall growth will not mess up next years growth. It will help protect the plants from the cold, it will help hold soil and snow will get trapped so it won't blow away and help prevent winterkill.
    I will remember all this, hopefully! :) I do like the idea of the soil and snow staying to help it out. Now let's hope we don't get the massive thaws like this past winter. We supposedly got 8 inches more than normal snowfall. But the only thing that is going to grow massively due to that extra is the ditch runoff areas! Down came the snow... out came the sun, up went the temperatures, there went the snow, flooding down to the ditch runoffs! Urgh!
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ridemcowgirl069    
    Mow it down to 6 inches. Then mow it again after 2 weeks. Once it's been able to be mowed a few times it should have a good enough root system to have the horses back on it. To make sure just pull on some strands and if it's hard to pull out the roots, your good to go. Make sure you rotate your pastures when they've been eaten down to 3 inches tall and don't let them back on until it's reached 6 to 8 inches. Should only take about 2 or 3 weeks. If it's the only pasture you have to put them on, divide into 3 sections so one is being grazed while one is being mowed and the third is being rested. You'll get more use out of a smaller space doing it this way and they won't be overgrazing. It also helps force them to graze evenly instead of over grazing in some spots and leaving others untouched. I've been able to keep 2 horses per acre using rotational grazing like this. In September, you need to make sure to fertilize and lime your pastures according to what your soil test says. This way you'll have great pastures in the spring when you put the horses back on it
    Posted via Mobile Device
    The only thing is we can't really mow. The pastures are *full* of boulders and rocks. We are slowly trying to get rid of them, but more just pop in their place, so we aren't anywhere close to being safe to mow. I can probably convince my husband to go at some of it with the weedeater, but it is about 2 acres worth, so it might be a while! Lol We could divide the areas off more. I just hate to see horses sitting in paddocks/pastures that they can't get up enough head to really run around and have fun. Even if they do have yummy food under their feet. :) They currently are in a different acre + area.
    I definitely need to go get the fertilizer and lime for the fall. So I assume horse poop spread with a drag doesn't count, huh?! :P


    Thanks everyone for the help. :)
         
        06-05-2014, 04:34 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GracielaGata    
    I definitely need to go get the fertilizer and lime for the fall. So I assume horse poop spread with a drag doesn't count, huh?! :P

    Thanks everyone for the help. :)
    That manure does have some NPK value (Nitorgen-Phosphorous-Potassium). Some extension services will test it for you, then you know how much of other stuff to add (if any!). Soil and manure/compost tests are the best bet.
         
        06-06-2014, 12:04 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Haha I know how you feel. My mower broke down so now we're using a push mower and a weed eater on 5 of our acres. Even if all you can do is weed eat it that would still be good. You can't let it grow so tall because once it gets above 8 to 10 inches the plant stops using its carbs for foliage and starts using it for the seed heads and then once it has seeds it goes dormant, and if your horses are as picky as mine they won't want to eat it and they'll start pulling up any new growth close to the ground then you'll be left with a field of stemy grass that has gone dormant for the year and the horses won't like. Another reason it has to be mowed is because the new growth needs light to produce carbs or it will die. Also you might want to dethatch it if your thatch is more than a 1/4 inch thick so new plant growth can come up. We had a field that hadn't been touched in years and we took the weed eater to it than we dethatched it and with in about 2 weeks it was absolutely beautiful. You really just need to go out and walk your whole field and look very closely at what's going on at ground level. You can also call your local extension office and they can send someone out to walk the field with you and they'll know exactly what needs to be done.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         

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