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Your experience with (buried) electric dog fencing

This is a discussion on Your experience with (buried) electric dog fencing within the Farm Forum forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • Bury horse panel dog fence
  • Boxer wireless fences

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    01-31-2012, 01:47 PM
  #11
Yearling
There is a simple and cheaper solution before you invest in the complete underground wire.

PetSafe offers a wireless electronic control unit. It is $299? $249? You can purchase online or at PetSmart. It comes with one electric collar.

It works the same way, but creates a circular dome. One unit can give your dog a good distance from the house. I lived in a rental house without fencing and used that for my two dogs. Once I left that house, I moved the unit to my camper and instead of tying my dogs at campgrounds next to the trailer, I have their collars on them and an electric zone.

The premise is no wires to bury. You set the unit up in the house and identify the overall area you want your dogs to have. There are 20 distance settings. And the shape is always round.

I also like these collars because they allow you to set the level of "NO" to the dog. From noise only to a pretty good kick in the pants.

Bad things about all electronic fencing.

As farmpony84 mentioned, a fast dog can get past the fence with barely a nip. But, a slow dog coming back home will get a gangbuster nip (nip being the technical term for the impulse).

Training on smart dogs is less than 4 weeks. Dull dogs or dogs with high pain threshold, more than 4. You have to put flags out, these are the visual queues for your dogs. And, during the training phase, you must always place the dog on a leash to train. During the training phase, every trip outside must include you with you dog on the leash. No shortcuts.

Some dogs are impervious to fencing. The costs to install inground wires can cost upward of $1k. If you are unsure if your dog will respond well to the fencing, the wireless solution is very affordable. Once your dog has trained to it, you can expand to the underground (which gives you a wider area AND you can create contour (square, oblong) perimeters. And then sell the wireless on eBay if you can't repurpose it.
     
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    01-31-2012, 01:54 PM
  #12
Super Moderator
I used the petsafe dome, the issue I ran into was that I had it mounted outside to give the area I wanted and when it got wet, it croaked on me...
     
    01-31-2012, 02:01 PM
  #13
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by egrogan    
Thanks, Jacks. That's the kind of feedback I was looking for. Have you ever seen training/behavior modification that can take the "run" out of a "runner"? We would be willing to invest in something like that but aren't sure it would work?
Obedience training.
  1. Buy a long-line for your dog. 25-50 feet should be sufficient. 100 is also good. Nothing less than 25. Never use a flexi lead.
  2. Put the dog on an appropriately fitting buckle collar. Never use a prong or pinch collar for this. Slip (choke) chains are okay for bigger dogs, but you may want to try the buckle first.
  3. Grab hold of the end very firmly, using leather gloves.
  4. Have someone else open the door.
  5. HOLD YOUR GROUND.
Let your dog bolt out of the door. When he reaches the end of the long line, if you held your ground well enough and he built up momentum he will get a correction he has never experienced. Don't be surprised if he yelps. If he lands over backwards, even better.

Look at him with disdain and say, Serves you Right.

Drag his butt back in the house, repeat the process.

Bet by the 3rd time he starts slowing down before he feels the tension in the lead. After he begins anticipating that distance, reel him in by shortening the long-line. Repeated enough times, he will expect the correction within 12 feet of the door.

If you are not strong enough to hold your ground (think of the force of him running) enlist the help of someone else.

I have done this with a 28 lb English cocker. He decided to start pulling this nonsence out the front door. Open door, out he goes, down the street to sniff stuff. The first time he yelped and landed on his hip. The second time he yelped but did not flip (he was slowing down) the third time he chose to not leave the porch.

Other obedience would be to teach the Recall using the long-line. Go outside with your dog allow him to leave your side. Call. If he doesn't turn and come to you, drag him to you. Happily. But, you have control, make him listen. If he does anything, so much as turn his head to you, PRAISE. Get him to respect that when you say "Come" you mean now.


Digital aids would include a remote zapper collar. Hunters use these to teach their gun dogs to stay within distance.

I've been training dogs for the show ring and home obedience for over 15 years. This is my first horse.

Everyone talks about getting their horse to respect them no matter what. But, this is a classic example of a dog that has no respect for a person. I bet if your horse chose to do something so disrespectful, you would nip that in the bud.

I am definitely not criticizing, just musing over this in general. I was the poster asking about my horse lipping me and how cute. If my dog mouthed me he would feel the level of NO I meant.

Hmmmm. There is a psychological reason, just need to define it.
     
    01-31-2012, 02:03 PM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by farmpony84    
I used the petsafe dome, the issue I ran into was that I had it mounted outside to give the area I wanted and when it got wet, it croaked on me...
Yea, it's not a large area. My rental house was on a city sized postage stamp lot. I set it up at the back of the house so the dogs would get the brunt of space at the rear of the lot.

And, it must be kept indoors.
     
    01-31-2012, 02:08 PM
  #15
Yearling
I am soaking up all this great feedback and so appreciative you all took the time to share your experience.

Sam, I think you are totally right that obedience training is a must. We got her as our second dog from a pet adoption clinic, to be a companion for our very shy, extremely submissive Lab mix. He is the kind of dog that runs directly home if his collar slips off (literally); she is the kind that is friendly, outgoing, distracted, and in her own world. We are very vigilant about open doors and gates, but we've had problems when friends come over and stand at the door with it wide open- both times she got out, it was because someone was standing at the door and she shot out before anyone could get her.

I think your analogy to demanding respect from a horse is accurate. I can 100% admit we have not invested time in training her to stop the running; we didn't know how. I can imagine the obedience training steps you outlined above, but am also friendly with a professional dog trainer at the barn so may just do this right with a trainer from the beginning.

After reading all these stories, I think deep down I will always be concerned that any sort of electric or wireless fence is not really going to hold her in, and I need to be confident that if I tell her to "come," she will.

Lots to think about! Thanks again.
     
    01-31-2012, 02:09 PM
  #16
Trained
I agree with a lot of your points, Joe4d, but I don't agree with breeds connecting with runners. I believe it all comes down to proper puppy training.
We had a runner that a family gave us bc they thought he needed acreage to run. We couldn't keep him, a Boxer mix, contained, and that was when I had cattle fencing. He would take off for about 3 days, and come back only when hungry. We tried keeping him in the basement, but he chew on things and destroy my property. We tried enclosing him in chainlink panels, but he'd dig his way under to escape. We tried chaining him but he'd dig and work on the tree closeby (for shade and comfort for HIM.)
My German Shepherd/Collie mix, "Xena" -- for whom I got "Chuzzlewitt" for her company -- would play with him outside for about 10 minutes, until he found some break in the (aging) fencing and would take off at a dead run. When he would take off into the farm field, she would look at me as ask why her playmate wouldn't stay put. (WHAT do you say to your Good dog?!?!?) =/
Xena has passed on, and my dog, "Rose" is 1/4 Border Collie, and behaves like she is full blooded. She chases and hunts but, if you forget to let her in, she waits patiently on the cement steps--NEVER had to go find her...except...the time I left the SUV door open, and she jumped in the car without me knowing it. She won't bark and tell you she's trapped somewhere. I took me an hour that day last winter to finally find her, waiting patiently for a ride that wasn't going to happen. LOL
"Pygma," my Lab mix, is a Velcro dog and won't let me out of her sight. They BOTH are 1/4 GS. I prefer getting puppies so I don't have to fix a problem somebody else started.
     
    01-31-2012, 02:13 PM
  #17
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by egrogan    
I am soaking up all this great feedback and so appreciative you all took the time to share your experience.

Sam, I think you are totally right that obedience training is a must. We got her as our second dog from a pet adoption clinic, to be a companion for our very shy, extremely submissive Lab mix. He is the kind of dog that runs directly home if his collar slips off (literally); she is the kind that is friendly, outgoing, distracted, and in her own world. We are very vigilant about open doors and gates, but we've had problems when friends come over and stand at the door with it wide open- both times she got out, it was because someone was standing at the door and she shot out before anyone could get her.

I think your analogy to demanding respect from a horse is accurate. I can 100% admit we have not invested time in training her to stop the running; we didn't know how. I can imagine the obedience training steps you outlined above, but am also friendly with a professional dog trainer at the barn so may just do this right with a trainer from the beginning.

After reading all these stories, I think deep down I will always be concerned that any sort of electric or wireless fence is not really going to hold her in, and I need to be confident that if I tell her to "come," she will.

Lots to think about! Thanks again.
Great news!!! I'm glad you have a professional within your circle. There are as many different dog training philosophies as there are horse training philosophies. And what works for one dog may not work for another. Your trainer will have a much better go at reading your dog's sensitivity and awareness and applying techniques that will cause your dog to react and learn the quickest.
     
    02-01-2012, 12:04 AM
  #18
Started
It worked very well on my lab mix for a pretty long time. Where I made my mistake is I started leading him out of the fence. I had to really coax him to get him out...he was terrified of the fence. I did it twice and after that he would bolt through the fence in that exact place every time.

It really took a lot of training. It is by no means a quick and easy fix. Not only do you have to diligently take your dog out on a leash for weeks, but you also have to pay special attention to make sure that if your dog is close to the fence that you have the leash tight enough so that he goes the right way when he gets shocked. You are also not supposed to take the dog outside the fence until after they are fully trained.

If I had know then what I know now, I would have never taken him out of the fence even after the training period was up. I would have designed it so that I could drive into the fence and put him in my vehicle.
     
    02-01-2012, 07:40 AM
  #19
Yearling
Don't like them because they are not reliable like other people have said, I've never used one because my dog is property trained and rarely ever leaves (his a pure border collie) unless someone tautens him to come over (my neighbors are jerks).

But a person down the road has a husky on one and the battery dies like once a month (or more) and you know about it because he comes over to play with Cruiser, I usually catch him with a rope and leave him tied to our step until they come pick him up.
     
    02-01-2012, 10:03 AM
  #20
Green Broke
The wireless ones are probably better, They work on a different system that I think gives them and advantage. The wire systems shock when you get close to the wire, the wireless system is the exact opposite, it shocks when you get away from the transmitter. So the dog can run through a short barrier. It starts shocking and keeps on shocking till it gets home, I like the idea of its portability for horse camping. I didnt like the very short range though. Id like my do to have access to a bigger area of pasture for predator control.
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