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2 new Walkers shipped from Tennessee, advice please

This is a discussion on 2 new Walkers shipped from Tennessee, advice please within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category

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        06-14-2014, 09:09 AM
      #21
    Started
    Interesting. My walker stands dead still to be mounted and doesn't move a muscle until I tell her. Good thing because she is real tall and I'm short, old and chubby.

    It's other things that make for weird holes in her training. She really has no idea about leg or seat.
         
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        06-14-2014, 10:07 AM
      #22
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ZombieHorseChick    
    I need I work my paint mare on standing still wile mounting, she's getting really bad about that, and I prefer to ride bareback as well so getting her next to something and stay there is a challenge :3
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Patience/work patience/work lol

    I never got a picture of this but, when my long 3 yr old TWH was in training, I had to get off him for some dumb thing while road riding. I was in my late 50's by then so, just bouncing right back onto him was not going to happen.

    Having come from a padded barn where he didn't "make" and went to auction, he also was not one to stand perfectly still.

    Not only did I put him three feet down in the ditch, I had to crawl back up on the road to get on him.

    I said "Sultan stay and wait, stay and wait". Love that young lad he stayed and waited while I literally sat down on him.

    I don't own a horse who didn't wish for a bag over their heads, thanks to some of the places I've put them so I could get back on

    Give yourself plenty of time to re-school your horse. It will pay off once she realizes you mean business, as it sounds like she's decided she doesn't want to listen anymore. Much like the Big Guy I posted above, he will get away with whatever little thing he thinks he can, including subtley shifting away from the trailer. My other three aren't like that but he makes up for their perfect behavior in spades
    Wallaby likes this.
         
        06-15-2014, 08:57 PM
      #23
    Foal
    It's my own fault for not keeping up with her wile my sister slacked ( my sister gave her to me after she got married,she hadn't worked with her at all for a long time on anything and I just did ground manners, nothing under saddle really) so I need to crack down on manners under saddle :3
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        06-15-2014, 09:44 PM
      #24
    Foal
    My walker is a daily fight to mount. Every ride we fight.
    He 'boyfriend' would freeze in a hurricane until asked to move.

    Just a training thing.
         
        06-15-2014, 10:12 PM
      #25
    Foal
    When I read this,I thought my TW gelding was only one who didn't stand still when mounted. He is a great trail horse,but think he was use to previous owners mounting as he moved. He's tall and I have to use stump,table,etc, to mount and have granddaughter hold him. He won't stand at mounting block and I haven't been able to work with him standing at block. He lives at daughter and soninlaws place. He walks and will gait when I cue him,so its not like he moves off quickly when mounted. My oldest granddaughter can get on him bareback and he stands still.
         
        06-18-2014, 01:49 AM
      #26
    Weanling
    The term "shotgun trained" has come up a few times - I'm guessing that means they were trained in a hurry, just enough to call them "broke" and get them sold.

    Apart from not standing for mounting up, what other issues tend to come up with these kinds of horses?
    As a group, it sounds like they're all fine trail horses, but maybe they have the same set of weaknesses.

    If that's the case, here's a few other things about mine that maybe you all have seen in your horses too:
    In addition to not standing for tacking/mounting is also head-shy, and hard to catch. He doesn't know how to lunge outside a pen either.

    On the plus side, he leads, loads, picks up his feet and stands for the farrier.
    He'll stand tied, but not happily.

    What I've noticed as far as correcting the head-shyness and the catching is that setting aside the time (even hours) to work slowly has been much more effective than trying to force him to do something "cowboy style."
    There have been times when I've had to spend 2+ hours walking him down, back and forth across the pasture, until he lets me catch him.
    As long as I catch him, even for a pat, every single day, he stays (relatively) easy to work with.
    If I give him a break, he gets more difficult again.
    Malda likes this.
         
        06-18-2014, 11:05 AM
      #27
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BadWolf    
    The term "shotgun trained" has come up a few times - I'm guessing that means they were trained in a hurry, just enough to call them "broke" and get them sold.

    That's a pretty close definition. You could add the thought about just getting them enough training to do one job (of course that might be more properly called "rifle training" ).

    Apart from not standing for mounting up, what other issues tend to come up with these kinds of horses?

    Painting with too broad a brush is possible, here, but some other common issues are not teaching the basics of "being a horse" through thoughtful ground work. This would include difficulty in bringing in from a pasture; failure to tie quietly for grooming; failure to stand quietly for vet/farrier; poor leading manners; etc.

    Then there are holes in fundamental work under saddle, such as not knowing the meaning of cues from the natural aids (hand, seat, and leg). Many are not allowed to canter, only gait (under the flawed assumption that work at the canter compromises gait quality).


    As a group, it sounds like they're all fine trail horses, but maybe they have the same set of weaknesses.

    Horses from the same general, geopraphic area will often exhibit the same weaknesses. Culture counts. Horses bred and trained for the show ring often have some of the biggest issues. Close behind are the "backyard horses."

    If that's the case, here's a few other things about mine that maybe you all have seen in your horses too:
    In addition to not standing for tacking/mounting is also head-shy, and hard to catch. He doesn't know how to lunge outside a pen either.

    No surprises here, but this is a relatively easy one to fix.

    On the plus side, he leads, loads, picks up his feet and stands for the farrier.
    He'll stand tied, but not happily.

    He'll learn if you give him the chance. This means bring the horse up, tie him, and then go about your business for a few hours. In the beginning keep a weather eye on the horse for difficulties, but he'll quickly learn that this is normal.

    What I've noticed as far as correcting the head-shyness and the catching is that setting aside the time (even hours) to work slowly has been much more effective than trying to force him to do something "cowboy style."

    The mantra if any good horseman is "I have time."

    There have been times when I've had to spend 2+ hours walking him down, back and forth across the pasture, until he lets me catch him.

    You're playing his "game" when you do this. Pick a system of training and the make the horse play your "game."

    As long as I catch him, even for a pat, every single day, he stays (relatively) easy to work with.

    Normal behavior for most horses.

    If I give him a break, he gets more difficult again.
    Again, normal behavior for a lot of horses. There are a few that you can turn out today go back in six months and they'll be exactly the same horse. Most don't fall into this category.

    G.
    Skipsfirstspike likes this.
         
        07-01-2014, 08:34 AM
      #28
    Foal
    All my horses stand well to be mounted. I will not tolerate them moving. I require them to stand on a loose rein too.

    If you are having issues with the technique you are using you could try the one I use.

    First and foremost - if you want your horse to stand still when you get on -MAKE SURE THAT WHEN YOU GET ON YOU STAND STILL. In other words, don't ride off, just sit there. Wait 10 seconds, or even thirty. Never let your horse make the decision to move. Practice just sitting on the horse nice and still. I have ridden reining horses and one of the main ingredients in getting a great sliding stop is to practice just standing still and the horse then gets to look for the reward of standing still.

    OK, How do I insist the horse stays still? Assume to start that you are already on the horse. It walks forward and goes 10 steps. Back it 10 steps to where it was and LET THE REINS GO. Then it will probably rush forward again. Pick the reins up and back it up to where it was, let the reins go and sit there. Horse steps sideways 4 steps, then side pass back 4 steps and let the reins go. Repeat, repeat etc. etc. (obviously it has to back up and respond to the leg and rein). After a bit the horse realises it "profits you not" to do the unwanted thing (a saying about reward and discouragement form an old Australian horse trainer)

    When you are out on the trail do the same. You stop the horse, it wanders forward 6 steps, haul it back 6 steps. Let the reins go. You tell it when to go, you tell it when to stop. Don't leave the decision up to the horse.

    The same principle applies when you are trying to mount. You will need to do some training sessions when you have time. If horse moves sideways go around the other side and push it back to the exact spot where it was. If it goes forward, back it up etc.

    Half mount, if it moves get off and put horse back where it was. Finally, when you mount, and it moves half way through you are not going to be able to fix the problem while you are getting on. Finally when you are seated in the saddle 15 feet forward of where you started, then back it up to where you were before it moved off. Then let the reins go and just sit there for a while.

    Keep putting the horse back in the exact same spot it started at. TWHs are not dumb and should get that idea after a bit of insistence.

    I think circling might not work so well with some horses as it might stir them up and get them anticipating moving, rather than standing still.
         
        07-04-2014, 05:45 PM
      #29
    Foal
    When I first got my TWH mare she would not stand still to mount, and would move out before my butt hit the saddle. I was able to train her to stand and move out when I asked in a relatively short time, but it was quite the experience at first lol! Kinda' scared me the first few times Now she stands like a rock for mounting & won't move out until I tell her to. She's a former big licker so she didn't know any better
         
        07-22-2014, 07:28 PM
      #30
    Foal
    I am having this same problem with my spotted saddle horse.
         

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