Been through hell and back - Page 3
 
 

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Been through hell and back

This is a discussion on Been through hell and back within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Well i have never been through hell and back
  • Flat shod tennessee walking horse+what degree angle are they shod

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    05-24-2012, 08:03 PM
  #21
Weanling
I agree wholeheartedly with the other posters who recommended calling in a specialist. Get some x-rays done, and have a chiropractor out. He really does look off somewhere.

I know you've been having trouble with getting weight on him, too... I know how frustrating it can be to have a horse that as soon as you fix one issue, another crops up. Some days I call Smoke "99 problems". Heh.
But, the best thing your boy has going for him is your love and attentive care. You will do what is best for him, I am sure of that.

Good luck.
     
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    05-24-2012, 08:36 PM
  #22
Weanling
OP - After watching and rewatching the three videos several times and doing quite a bit of research (as well as referring to some past experience), I would tentatively and unprofessionally suggest your boy has developed arthritis in his hocks. Because of this, assuming this is the case, his pelvis and/or SI and/or stifles can be out of sorts (from the swiveling motion in his hocks placing extra stress on muscles, throwing things out of alignment). This can also explain a front end "lameness"; ie over-compensating. As well, it could explain him getting up oddly.

The great news is that if this is the case, treatment options are very optimistic and pretty cheap. A vet and chiro are your first solutions, calling for radiographs to determine degeneration and fusing of the joints (lower joint fusion = good, upper = not so good), as well as adjusting the pelvis and/or back/etc to help realign things. He may or may not (if this is all true) require injections in the joints, though personally I am not entirely for them. Lastly, physio exercises and semi-regular chiro visits to strengthen the muscles to hold his joints in place.

I have a friend whose 10 year old Saddlebred jumper developed arthritis (mild) and it caused all sorts if issues. After a few months she was already back to normal, and now over a year later, she is in a regular chiro schedule and still jumping regularly.

Fear not! There is always hope.

Cheers,
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    05-24-2012, 08:54 PM
  #23
Weanling
Thought I would add this: odd leg movement?

Horse seems to move in the way your boy moves, if I interpretted the OPs words correctly. Note what is said about sacral problems/massage.

On a slightly tangential note, many many illnesses and ailments can be cured through chiropractic care - in humans and animals. Even if this is not the root of his problems, if will significantly aid in maintaining his health while you figure out what "is" going on.

Last note: has he been checked for Wobbling? I doubt he is a wobbler, but testing is fairly simple.

Cheers,
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    05-24-2012, 08:59 PM
  #24
Weanling
"I am sorry he told you to "keep riding him....." but, here is my question. You have had your horse with this man for some MONTHS. You say you don't ride the horse. Why then would he say that? Puzzling, I think. "


Im confused to this question. He told me not to ride him.which I havnt per vet instructions due to weight.He was moved there in december.I rode once or twice a week.Feb we went out on a trail and the horse came unglued over a dog coming out of the bushes.So I put him in training at this barn.While in training the vet came out and instructed all training and riding to stop because he was under weight.That was middle of march I think.So does that clear it up I hope.
     
    05-24-2012, 09:08 PM
  #25
Trained
You need a good equine veterinarian to evaluate him.

I have seen a lot of big lick horses after their shoes are pulled, and they move kinda like he does. I have never followed them long term to know how they came out.

As far as his weight, he needs more to eat. He is not all that thin, but he is too thin. I would feed him more hay.

As far as riding him, I would want to be sure that he does not have any neurological problems (equine protozoal myelitis, wobblers, etc.) just to make sure that he is not dangerous to ride. You don't want him falling with you on him. Otherwise, I doubt that light riding will hurt him.

You need a good equine veterinarian to evaluate him.
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    05-24-2012, 09:13 PM
  #26
Super Moderator
OP, I am not knowledgeable enough to give you advice in a show bred TWH movement. But, I will tell many of these posters that there is a huge difference in the haunch movement of a TWH than any other breed of horse who doesn't have this gaited action. I have seen TWH show horses that have very similar action. They have a weird ability to step WAY under themselves that makes them look very "wonky"

Since you bought him from a show barn, was he ever anything but flat shod? Even flat, they will exhibit very different movement than other horses.

The horse in this video is totally sound. However, not being familiar with TWH, he looks odd to me.


Before you post on a thread, make sure you know what you are talking about AND, if you feel that you disagree, do it NICELY. It really is not that hard!!

Diego, I am so sorry your reception here was so hostile. There really are nice and helpful people on this forum.

Do get a vet who understands TWH to check him out. Then, come back and let us know what they find out.
     
    05-24-2012, 09:16 PM
  #27
Started
How did you come by this horse in the first place? Seems like a lot for a new horse owner to try and take on. ):
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    05-24-2012, 09:21 PM
  #28
Trained
If you are paying full board at this barn, and he is too thin, then the same guy that is criticizing the horse is also not feeding him enough.

Thanks for the video Allison. Yes they do look "wonky". I have ridden flat shod walking horses, and they are smooth as silk. I once had the opportunity to ride a "big lick" horse. He was also smooth as silk, but he felt "wonky". His front feet were flying all over the place and his back feet were waving around wildly. He (the horse) was pretty nonchalant about the whole thing.
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    05-24-2012, 09:24 PM
  #29
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
Ripper, I have to say that you immediate and incredibly rude response to this poster is out of line. No more.

OP, I am not knowledgeable enough to give you advice in a show bred TWH movement. But, I will tell many of these posters that there is a huge difference in the haunch movement of a TWH than any other breed of horse who doesn't have this gaited action. I have seen TWH show horses that have very similar action. They have a weird ability to step WAY under themselves that makes them look very "wonky"

Since you bought him from a show barn, was he ever anything but flat shod? Even flat, they will exhibit very difference movement than other horses.

The horse in this video is totally sound. However, not being familiar with TWH, he looks odd to me.

The Tennessee Walking Horse - Lite Shod to Performance - YouTube

Before you post on a thread, make sure you know what you are talking about AND, if you feel that you disagree, do it NICELY. It really is not that hard!!

Diego, I am so sorry your reception here was so hostile. There really are nice and helpful people on this forum.

Do get a vet who understands TWH to check him out. Then, come back and let us know what they find out.

I am..When we move the vet and the farrier is the first call.I have had many tell me he is being trimmed at a wrong angle.On here and in real life.Here is what I know of him.I got him a year ago light shod.The barn he was at had him light shod the whole time they had him.Dont know how long that was but I know it was longer then a yea because she had to update the coggins when I got him.She got him from a man that was getting out of walkers all together and her friend who is now my friend got his stallion.So I know the stallion.My horse is 7. Bought him when he was just turning 6 so they got him when he was five.So yeah I guess there was time for him to be padded up at some point.But I can't be sure.I have looked for soring scars and can't find anything.
     
    05-24-2012, 09:26 PM
  #30
Yearling
Hi DM. I hope Diego is ok!! He's such a cutie. Like I said earlier, I have the other gimpy black one. I know a lot of vets don't like working on Walkers. It takes a lot of looking sometimes to find one proficient with their particular way of going. Don't give up on him. They are out there.
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