Which Bit for an MFT - Page 2
 
 

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Which Bit for an MFT

This is a discussion on Which Bit for an MFT within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category

     
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        09-03-2010, 11:30 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sachmo    
    Again I am going to say it, try a bitless bridle. If you are too insecure on your horse then no bit will work. I have never seen a horse that is not happier in a bitless bridle and if you use your cues properly you DO NOT NEED A BIT. I think if you could just try one you would find your horse to be much, much happier, relaxed and very willing. You do not need a bit to get the correct headset, or for collection or to do reigning.
    Actually, I've had horses go both ways. Loki hates bitless. He just doesn't like working in it, he's much happier with something in his mouth. I'm actually thinking about getting a double jointed, or a straight bar, like Clouds mentioned. He's a bit of a quirk, he'd probably be pleased as pie with a solid mouthpiece. He does very well in my regular eggbutt, but why not make him even happier?

    On the other side, Sammy (TWH) hated bits (teeth fine)! He did relatively well in a snaffle, but was much happier in just a simple halter, or fluffy nosepieced mechanical hackamore. He neck reined and worked very well off the legs, so it worked fine with him. If he was greener in terms of working off cues, I would have looked for a more appropriate bitless setup.
    But, since he was essentially finished, he didn't require anything special. I felt most comfortable working in a halter with him, it allowed me to lunge him easily and was fine if I needed to use the reins to whoa. Light pressure, much less than if I was asking him to back on the ground, was enough to work him.

    It really varies from horse to horse. My QH mare works fine either way, she's pleased in her snaffle, or just working around in a halter. Again, she's more finished in cues, so she doesn't require a special or really proper setup.
         
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        09-04-2010, 12:41 PM
      #12
    Yearling
    Bitless works for some horses if all you want to do is ride in a straight line. For anything more they are pretty useless.

    Comparing a bit to a bitless rig (like the Dr. Cook) is like comparing a high quality, digital communication system to a tin can telephone. Both can work at a basic level, but only one can go beyond that.

    Sometimes a sidepull is an alternative. It has the same lack of precision as the proprietary "bitless" rigs but is much cheaper. Some can also accomodate a bit without reins and this can be valuable if you are trasitioning from bitless to bit.

    Several folks tout the hackemore. This is a very problematical device because it can be incredibly powerful but look pretty benign. It, too, is a poor device to teaching the horse to bend.

    Since many training problems stem from a failure to bend (or a failure to yield to pressure) I am not a fan of anything that "bypasses" these important lessons. If there is a mouth pathology the prevents use of bit then bitless is viable. If it's just a "training shortcut" then it's a Bad Idea.

    The advice about mouthpiece is very important. Many folks forget that a "snaffle" means no leverage, not "broken mouthpiece." Also, if you have small mouthed horse you don't want to cram a thick, "humane" mouthpiece in there. I know a couple of folks who had to abandon the KK bits as they are made mostly with the WB in mind and the bars are quite thick.

    Personally, I like the Myler line of bits. They have a wide variety, are very well made, and they have some good advice in some of their publications. The downside is that they are not cheap. Still, the bit I'm using right now is over ten years old and shows little sign of age. So maybe quality doesn't cost, it pays.

    G.
         
        09-04-2010, 01:43 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Where do you get the idea that all you can do is a straight line in a bitless bridle. I do all kinds of bends, circles, serpentines, leg yielding, even neck reigning in a bitless bridle. It is my opinion that if you cannot get your horse to do these things in a bitless bridle you are not riding the horse correctly. You should be able to do all this without a bit or pulling and yanking on the reigns. Bits just make the horse unhappy and the rider feel like they have control.
         
        09-04-2010, 06:12 PM
      #14
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sachmo    
    Bits just make the horse unhappy and the rider feel like they have control.
    If a bit makes your horse unhappy (and they have no medical/teeth problems), then you're doing something wrong. Bitless doesn't work for every horse... some horses need much clearer signals than others, and it's physically harder to give clear signals with a bitless bridle than with a bit. While I applaud you for having a smart horse with the ability to learn these things bitless, I don't think it's a realistic option for every horse out there. To say that all bits are inherently wrong is ignorant and close-minded.
         
        09-04-2010, 06:20 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sachmo    
    Where do you get the idea that all you can do is a straight line in a bitless bridle. I do all kinds of bends, circles, serpentines, leg yielding, even neck reigning in a bitless bridle. It is my opinion that if you cannot get your horse to do these things in a bitless bridle you are not riding the horse correctly. You should be able to do all this without a bit or pulling and yanking on the reigns. Bits just make the horse unhappy and the rider feel like they have control.
    Sorry, I disagree.

    The bit has been around for about 3000 years, and it was developed because the devices before that, bitless needless to say, were inadequate. As noted they are a completely fair and reasonable device to enhance rider communication. Note that I don't say that they will enhance "control." Although that is the usual result of better communication.

    G.
         
        09-04-2010, 07:54 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Guilherme    

    Personally, I like the Myler line of bits. They have a wide variety, are very well made, and they have some good advice in some of their publications. The downside is that they are not cheap. Still, the bit I'm using right now is over ten years old and shows little sign of age. So maybe quality doesn't cost, it pays.

    G.
    I use the Mylers and love them. In fact we have a 12 year old that the previous owners were using a snaffle. They said not to use anything stronger, well he wouldn't yield, drop his head or stop. We put him in a Myler training bit that has the noseband across so when he starts throwing his head up when going into a trot you can get him to drop his nose and tuck to achieve collection which he never did before. It is a very mild bit which uses a small amount of leverage. Now he is on the trail, holds his head as a QH should and is learning very well how to tuck and collect. We will soon move him into another Myler without the training aid and I know he will be a MUCH different horse.

    If your horse can ride bitless that is fine, but as others have stated some horses just don't recognize anything but the bit so stating everyone should ride bitless is like saying "don't buckle your seat belt because I don't think you need to". To each his own is my motto and forcing your opinion on others doesn't help their situation. As a suggestion it is taken as given.
         
        09-04-2010, 11:43 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Sorry I am not about to change my mind and agree with you, bits are control for the rider, they do not help the horse or make the horse happy, I could tell you lots of stories but why bother, if you are "afraid" and not open to the bitless bridles, I will not try to change your mind. I suppose you have "shoes" on your horse "for your peace of mind" and ride in a saddle with a tree, well I ride bitless, shoeless and treeless and I am proud of how happy all of my horses are. Everyone in the horse world has their opinion, that is mine and my horses are very happy, they all come from the field when I call them, they all love to be ridden, they are all happy, happy horses. With that being said, don't criticize me, I am only expressing my experiences. If you need a bit, you need it. Chances are the horse does not.
         
        09-05-2010, 07:50 AM
      #18
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sachmo    
    Sorry I am not about to change my mind and agree with you, bits are control for the rider, they do not help the horse or make the horse happy, I could tell you lots of stories but why bother, if you are "afraid" and not open to the bitless bridles, I will not try to change your mind. I suppose you have "shoes" on your horse "for your peace of mind" and ride in a saddle with a tree, well I ride bitless, shoeless and treeless and I am proud of how happy all of my horses are. Everyone in the horse world has their opinion, that is mine and my horses are very happy, they all come from the field when I call them, they all love to be ridden, they are all happy, happy horses. With that being said, don't criticize me, I am only expressing my experiences. If you need a bit, you need it. Chances are the horse does not.
    Well, you certainly hit all the Politically Correct buttons, don't you.

    There is certainly no interest on my part in changing your mind. It's clearly closed to any rational argument. Others, however, might want to review the matter and make their own decisions.

    I know my horses are happy when they are in a good pasture eating good grass. Beyond that I can only guess. And you can't really do anymore, regardless of your claims to the contrary.

    I follow only one philosophy, the Golden Rule of Equine Husbandry: You give the horse what it needs, when it needs it, and in appropriate quantity and quality. All else is commentary.

    I've posted photos of our equine uses before. I invite you to do the same.

    G.
         
        09-05-2010, 08:32 AM
      #19
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sachmo    
    Sorry I am not about to change my mind and agree with you, bits are control for the rider, they do not help the horse or make the horse happy, I could tell you lots of stories but why bother, if you are "afraid" and not open to the bitless bridles, I will not try to change your mind. I suppose you have "shoes" on your horse "for your peace of mind" and ride in a saddle with a tree, well I ride bitless, shoeless and treeless and I am proud of how happy all of my horses are. Everyone in the horse world has their opinion, that is mine and my horses are very happy, they all come from the field when I call them, they all love to be ridden, they are all happy, happy horses. With that being said, don't criticize me, I am only expressing my experiences. If you need a bit, you need it. Chances are the horse does not.
    Honestly no one is criticizing you, you are the one forcing your opinions on others, why so defensive? It's your way or the highway. Let's all agree to disagree and leave it at that. Just because you have found your "way" doesn't mean everyone will agree with your decisions.

    How do you know they are all happy, do they have big smiles and chuckle all day long. If we really want to discuss it horses would prefer to be left alone in a pasture with deep green grass doing nothing more than grazing all day with their own kind. By that I mean no no halter, no bit, no bridle, no saddle and most of all no rider.

    I am not "afraid", I communicate with my horses through the choice of a bit.
    MY horse, My decision, Your horse, Your decision. And no our horses are barefoot, why is that any of your business, you are beginning to look like a person who loves to argue just for the sake of argument.
         
        09-05-2010, 08:51 AM
      #20
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sachmo    
    Sorry I am not about to change my mind and agree with you, bits are control for the rider, they do not help the horse or make the horse happy, I could tell you lots of stories but why bother, if you are "afraid" and not open to the bitless bridles, I will not try to change your mind. I suppose you have "shoes" on your horse "for your peace of mind" and ride in a saddle with a tree, well I ride bitless, shoeless and treeless and I am proud of how happy all of my horses are. Everyone in the horse world has their opinion, that is mine and my horses are very happy, they all come from the field when I call them, they all love to be ridden, they are all happy, happy horses. With that being said, don't criticize me, I am only expressing my experiences. If you need a bit, you need it. Chances are the horse does not.
    If I'd known you were an irrational, illogical, close-minded bitless/treeless/shoeless extremist, I wouldn't have bothered typing out my last response (which, by the way, you completely failed to acknowledge... I guess the extreme logic and rational scared your small mind away).

    How dare you imply that the hard-earned money I spend every 5 weeks on shoes for my horse is for MY peace of mind. If you could see him walk barefoot across pavement or gravel, you would feel differently (or at least I'd like to think so).

    How dare you imply that my horses are unhappy because of such trivial things.

    I really wonder how people come to be so absurdly close-minded.
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