Bit Question - Page 3
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds > Gaited Horses

Bit Question

This is a discussion on Bit Question within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        08-06-2009, 10:06 PM
      #21
    Weanling
    As far as keeping the horse shod...its unhealthy for their feet to have them shod nonstop. Every farrier and vet I have talked to have told me that.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        08-07-2009, 07:45 AM
      #22
    Zab
    Yearling
    Barefoot is always the most healthy, but only as long as the horse can be worked barefoot without getting sore. No training is natural to a horse, and we must remember that their hooves arn't designed for managing our grounds, our weight and our ways to make the horse move. If it can't go barefoot with no problem whatsoever when ridden, and you want to keep it barefoot, then don't work it. But, some horses can't even go in the pature barefoot, sadly, without being sore. For them, it's certainly better to be shod at all times.

    I'm all for barefoot when it works, but keeping it shoed is sometimes the lesser of two evils, and it's not that bad. (now talking of regular shoes). And a horse that's evenly sore on all hooves can be really tricky to realize what's the problem, so unless the rider can be 100% sure that the problem doesn't come from soreness and that the horse is not sore, it's better to keep it shoed untill she can know for sure.
         
        08-07-2009, 09:30 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    I do agree with that if its going to sore the horse to have them barefoot...keep them shod...however I seriously doubt that's our problem as I have my farrier check every time he's out which is every 6 wks
         
        08-08-2009, 05:16 PM
      #24
    Zab
    Yearling
    Does the farrier ride him and feel if he's sore with a rider?
         
        08-09-2009, 02:21 AM
      #25
    Weanling
    Yea he rides him for a 3 hour trail ride...lmao!!! My vet has been to school to be able to tell when they are walking and moving a little faster, almost a trot. Which he does have me do before and after the trim. I don't use my farrier as a trainer. BUT Im not a riding moron! I can tell when a horse is favoring a foot and that's NOT THE SITUATION! I've had the saddle checked by a TWH trainer about 30 minutes away, I've had the vet check his teeth and they are not in need of being floated. Hense why I am asking about the bit. You don't have to be a rude *ss and act like this is my first go round with horses...
         
        08-09-2009, 06:33 AM
      #26
    Zab
    Yearling
    A slightly sore horse, that's evenly sore on all feet, like many recently barefoot horses, can be really tricky to detect, Especially if they're only sore with a rider on. It's nearly impossible to see from the ground unless the horse is really sore. But it can very well mess up the gaits.
    Since gaiting was part of the problem and he's recently un-shod, I wouldn't rule out sore hooves that easily.
         
        08-09-2009, 10:27 AM
      #27
    Weanling
    I can see your point there, sorry about the going off thing. I want re-shoeing him to be the last resort...gosh this would be so much easier if I could get ahold of the last owner. One question...He doesnt break gate if we go to a paved road and let him gait on it for a while (we don't leave him on it long though because he's barefoot) SO wouldnt that imply that he's not sore? AND on the dirt roads (thats where we ride its not actually trails like in the woods or anything) if you make him get behind and he gets a little upset he will not break gait while catching up. So I thinking it may be a laziness thing...but he didnt do it before we got him so UGGGHHHH Im at a loss. He is also ridden more now though than he was before. Sorry for rambling...
         
        08-09-2009, 01:38 PM
      #28
    Green Broke
    Ok, what is the problem? What do you need to know, Charlene1985?
         
        08-09-2009, 06:44 PM
      #29
    Zab
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by charlene1985    
    I can see your point there, sorry about the going off thing. I want re-shoeing him to be the last resort...gosh this would be so much easier if I could get ahold of the last owner. One question...He doesnt break gate if we go to a paved road and let him gait on it for a while (we don't leave him on it long though because he's barefoot) SO wouldnt that imply that he's not sore? AND on the dirt roads (thats where we ride its not actually trails like in the woods or anything) if you make him get behind and he gets a little upset he will not break gait while catching up. So I thinking it may be a laziness thing...but he didnt do it before we got him so UGGGHHHH Im at a loss. He is also ridden more now though than he was before. Sorry for rambling...
    Pavement is even and steady. It's not a place barefoot horses usually show soreness, unless they're sore because they've worn their hoof-walls down too much. It does wear more on the hooves than most ground tho, so keeping him off it is a good idea - unless you think he needs an extra trimming ;)
    Dirt roads?..Like where cars go as well? (just want to be sure of the type of road.. do you have a picture?) I'm not sure how much they differ from our dirt roads, but the ones here is one of the worst places for a sore, barefoot horse to go, since it's not as even as a paved road, they work like sand paper and there are small pebbles/stones/dirt that presses on the sole, especially at the side or the middle of the road.
    Soft paths or grass would be ideal. Regular arenas usually wears on the hooves as well (My Crow didn't need shoes untill he went onto the arena for training a few times, it wore hos hooves down).

    A stressed horse tends to get pacey/gaiting and might ignore pain. Tho, a sore horse could also gait better since it's a form of stress, so...
    Without seeing the horse, it COULD be lazyness.

    But I think he's slightly sore. It could be the lack of protecting shoes that makes his sole sore, or he could just be wearing the hooves down faster than they grow.. in the latter case you'll be without doubt in a while when he starts to bleed. But let's make sure that's not going to happen, right? ;) (I have seen a horse that came home from a ride, bleeding from 3 hooves. That rider had complained about the (non-gaited) horse being nervous/tensed after removing the shoes, but blamed it on increased blood-circuling and the sickness leaving the hooves after the shoes were removed or something.. :3 I admit tho that she had been more or less brainwashed by one of these people making a living on ''trimming the ultra-special barefoot way is the best for all horses and shoes are the ultimate evil''-theories.. but nevertheless it's a reason to check his hooves daily to make sure he's not starting to wear them down to the sole and further. Don't worry, there's quite a bit before it actually starts bleeding, I see that you care about your horse, so you'd surely notice that in time even if I didn't say anything about it.)

    There are barefoot-shoes/boots that you put on only for riding. Personally I think that keeping the horse shoed is better for the horse by various reasons, but if you're that much against re-shoeing him, maybe it's an option for you? If he starts gaiting again with them, you can be sure he was sore. If not, he might still be sore of course, or find those shoes strange, but then there's more of a doubt to it.
         
        08-09-2009, 09:44 PM
      #30
    Weanling
    I personally keep all of my horses barefoot and have had no problem gaiting anywhere. Barefoot is the way horses were born to be, but that's just my opinion. All of my horses hooves are hard as rocks and are extremely healthy. Now, there is a difference between the correct "barefoot trim" and just pulling shoes off and trimming. This is a process that takes a while, but is manageable. Most regular farriers cut away all the wonderful calluses our horses build up (it's the equivalent of us getting a pedi and then trying to walk on pavement or rocks!). A true "barefoot trim" allows most of that to stay on....

    I applaud you, Charlene, for wanting to stay barefoot as studies have shown it's what is best for the "whole" horse!

    As for the bits, I was riding in a Brenda Imus bit as well....My guy is 6 years old and trained for the show ring. Now that we are out on the trail, I needed something different...not more, just different...I went with the Mikmar Short Shank bit and OMG! You would be amazed at the difference in him on the trail! I suppose the change in bit could be just something as easy as letting him know "ok, this is the job we are doing today..." It just helped him focus more on the trail!
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    bit question farmpony84 Horse Training 15 05-22-2009 09:00 AM
    Question! IheartPheobe Trail Riding 9 05-10-2009 04:30 PM
    bit question Kaitlan Horse Training 6 09-10-2008 11:19 AM
    Bit question? Juno21 Horse Training 7 06-27-2008 02:22 PM
    Question! Flickergurl15 Horse Health 11 11-07-2007 10:37 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:21 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0