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Can any one help??

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        01-21-2014, 10:55 AM
      #11
    Started
    The part about riding the horse with the other gaited horse is a good idea:) Horses do tend to mimic each other.

    I'd love to throttle my champagne-smooth TWH, every time he gets behind the trotting Arab in the pasture

    Hollering "Rusty! Stop that trotting!" doesn't do a bit of good
         
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        01-21-2014, 02:25 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
    The part about riding the horse with the other gaited horse is a good idea:) Horses do tend to mimic each other.

    I'd love to throttle my champagne-smooth TWH, every time he gets behind the trotting Arab in the pasture

    Hollering "Rusty! Stop that trotting!" doesn't do a bit of good
    If horses REALLY "mimicked" each other we could un-employ a legion or two of trainers!!!

    They will "match speeds" and that can mean the gaited horse will move outside it's normal "speed range" and loose form. That will generally mean loss of smoothness. Depending upon native gait they may move to either the diagonal or the lateral. This, however, is not "mimicking."

    For a horse long out of work and not either fit or strong the word is "walk." Lots of it for a couple of weeks at a minimum. This, by the way, is monumentally boring for the human. During this time working on lateral movements, turns, halts, and the other fundamentals of sound equitation (for horse and rider) should be accomplished.

    After the horse is strong enough and fit enough to perform the intermediate gait then the rider should ask and see what they get. This will likely be the "native gait" the horse was born with. Now the rider can honestly evaluate the horse's way of going and make such changes as they wish to make.

    Use of any sort of "action device" in contraindicated. They will more than likely "distort" the horse's native way of going and the rider won't know what they really have. Even after they've made an honest evaluation the "action device" causes "action" but it trains nothing. Take the device off and the action goes away.

    Rehabbing a horse like the OPs is not a "weekend" project. It will take several months of work. There are no shortcuts.

    G.
         
        01-21-2014, 04:44 PM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Since you are not experienced with gaited horses another suggestion is take lessons on her from a good gaited horse trainer.

    Another thing that wouldn't hurt is bring in a combo chiro/physical therapist. She's been giving into that sore foot for 2 years and likely has her muscles and skeleton all sorts out of whack.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        01-22-2014, 10:58 AM
      #14
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Guilherme    
    If horses REALLY "mimicked" each other we could un-employ a legion or two of trainers!!!

    They will "match speeds" and that can mean the gaited horse will move outside it's normal "speed range" and loose form. That will generally mean loss of smoothness. Depending upon native gait they may move to either the diagonal or the lateral. This, however, is not "mimicking."

    G.
    It's interesting that our QH named Jack, who was raised with Miss Lacy.....will sometimes get into a flat walk when he's ridden with Miss Lacy.

    He doesn't do it often, and he doesn't hold it very long, but it does happen occasionally.

    Thus, the reason I think he's mimicking her.....

    Jack walks pretty darn fast anyway, and he doesn't really know he's a quarter horse....and we've never told him any different.... We only ride him with gaited horses and he's able to stay up with them without trotting....
         
        01-22-2014, 11:48 AM
      #15
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gunslinger    
    It's interesting that our QH named Jack, who was raised with Miss Lacy.....will sometimes get into a flat walk when he's ridden with Miss Lacy.

    He doesn't do it often, and he doesn't hold it very long, but it does happen occasionally.

    Thus, the reason I think he's mimicking her.....

    Jack walks pretty darn fast anyway, and he doesn't really know he's a quarter horse....and we've never told him any different.... We only ride him with gaited horses and he's able to stay up with them without trotting....
    A "fast walk" is not necessarily a true "intermediate gait." Nor is it necessarily a mimicking of the gait of the horse it's with. If this was a true trait of horses we could, literally, train gait by pairing a horse with a desired gait to one that does not (and, of course, watch out that the "mimicking" goes the direction we want it).

    For a true test you'd need to match, say, a pacy TWH at 5 mph to a truly centered TWH at 5 mph and see if the pacy horse copies the centered horse way of going. Or vice versa. And then have the experiment repeated in at least one, but preferably many, other place(s).

    G.
         
        01-22-2014, 01:56 PM
      #16
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gunslinger    
    It's interesting that our QH named Jack, who was raised with Miss Lacy.....will sometimes get into a flat walk when he's ridden with Miss Lacy.

    He doesn't do it often, and he doesn't hold it very long, but it does happen occasionally.

    Thus, the reason I think he's mimicking her.....

    Jack walks pretty darn fast anyway, and he doesn't really know he's a quarter horse....and we've never told him any different.... We only ride him with gaited horses and he's able to stay up with them without trotting....
    I think this is where muscle memory comes into play. If Jack has always been ridden with gaited horses it may at some point have been easier to walk faster and keep up, than it was for him to trot slow, after sometime Ol' Jack simply conditioned a certain set of muscles to walk fast enough to keep up with his gaited companions. Not necesarily mimicking but simply addapting and conditioning.

    Jim
         
        01-22-2014, 11:23 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    Take some very good advise from the "school of many mistakes". Walking will help nothing, absolutely nothing as it relates to gaiting. To get them to gait you have to practice gaiting(running walk in this case) Short sessions in gait with some weight on the front helps get them started. Once they are started, then use your body to keep it going. A very good trainer can usually get them started without any aid, but the novice might a have a tough time getting started. The trick is to get the front end out of the way of the rear, so the rear can "get up under themself". All of the "hype" about walk, walk, walk, to start them gaiting is exactly that "hype". You can not start something if you don't ask. You can ask, before all of the walk nonsense, OR you can ask before you spend days walking. A horse DOES NOT have to be in condition to do a small amount of gaiting. Now holding the gait for extended periods is an other story., Then conditioning is very important.
         
        01-22-2014, 11:59 PM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bbsmfg3    
    Take some very good advise from the "school of many mistakes". Walking will help nothing, absolutely nothing as it relates to gaiting. To get them to gait you have to practice gaiting(running walk in this case) Short sessions in gait with some weight on the front helps get them started. Once they are started, then use your body to keep it going. A very good trainer can usually get them started without any aid, but the novice might a have a tough time getting started. The trick is to get the front end out of the way of the rear, so the rear can "get up under themself". All of the "hype" about walk, walk, walk, to start them gaiting is exactly that "hype". You can not start something if you don't ask. You can ask, before all of the walk nonsense, OR you can ask before you spend days walking. A horse DOES NOT have to be in condition to do a small amount of gaiting. Now holding the gait for extended periods is an other story., Then conditioning is very important.
    Gaiting takes muscle and walking builds the muscles they need to gait. Of course you can built the muscles needed in gait too but if you don't know how to get them to gait in the first place...
         
        01-23-2014, 07:10 AM
      #19
    Foal
    Bob, I agree that one of the issues many people run into is that it is important for the front end to move so the back end can step through. I also agree that just walking isn't enough bit for a horse that has been laid up for 2yrs asking that horse to come out in a running walk is silly. I think many people mistake the term "walk" as just a leisurely ho hum stroll. When I say walk a horse especially a gaited horse I'm looking for a fairly quick head shaking stepping walk that falls somewhere between a flat walk and running walk. Just beyond the edge of that horses comfort level.

    Jim
         
        01-23-2014, 09:24 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    "Gaiting takes muscle and walking builds the muscles they need to gait"
    FALSE, nothing wrong with walking, but it does not build the muscle groups needed for gaiting. Totally different muscles. They only way to build the correct muscles is practice in gait, a little bit at a time. That's why the limited use of aids will help get them started. The walking "hype" only builds the riders confidence, not the horse's ability. It's just as easy to get one to gait "cold turkey" as it is after the walk hype. The rider's confidence is the only difference. As a matter of fact, I'd rather have one that has never been thru the walk hype, they are easier to get started.

    A naturally gaited horse can gait in it's first riding session after being a pasture ornament for years. Of course, you have to be careful to, only do it, if it's safe, and most times it is not. There is no conditioning needed. It's like saying a teenager that has never ran, can not run until they have walked the track for days. They may not do it well, in the beginning, but they can do it. They do have the inherent ability, the same way a gaited horse has the ability to do it's signature gait.

    Now if your trying to train a horse or human, to do a gait that is not bred into them, then it's a totally different ball game. And the walk hype is even less useful here.

    There is only one reason for all of the walking, rider safety, PERIOD....
         

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