Can someone explain a gaited horse to me? - Page 10
 
 

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Can someone explain a gaited horse to me?

This is a discussion on Can someone explain a gaited horse to me? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category

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        12-02-2010, 12:39 AM
      #91
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AnitaAnne    
    Maybe his canter did not look as rocking chair because he probably gets more canter work as a jumper than the average gaited horse. I would have expected him to be more hollow over the jumps because of the higher knee action, but he looked pretty round to me. Not maybe T-bred round, but round. I couldn't tell when he broke out of the canter what gait he was in either...I would say talented rider on a nice, willing horse. I do like a horse that tries hard!

    Ya he looks like he loves his job. Again I think the rider could be more proactive with balancing and I don't think you'd see this horse at any level past maybe 2'9" height but I think he is cute.
         
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        12-02-2010, 01:46 AM
      #92
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hrsrdr    
    (although the only similarity I found was the sitting towards the weakest part of the back on a gaited horse...you seem to disagree with a lot of other concepts which IMO is a very positive thing, but as all of you know I have been introduced to the gaited world for a very short time now so don't have as much say). :)
    Yes, I do think that you are begining to read the message I have been trying to say & maybe understand a bit of where I am coming from.

    First & foremost, I firmly believe that everyone can make their own decisions & also have the ability to do so. But how can one make a decision without practical knowledge?

    If one wants to learn about gaited horses, I am happy to share my knowledge, but I will not force my ideas on anyone, nor will I expect one to accept everything that is written or spoken, here or in books. The only way one can make informed decisions is to have both side of an issue & then personally experience it in a "hands on" manner (IMO).

    The videos help (IMO) to see the points that are made. If someone, such as yourself, goes out to ride a horse, don't you want to know what to look for & also what to avoid?

    It is of course hard to tell from just a picture, but on the link I sent you, I would expect the paint named "Willy" to have the best gait based on breed. He looks to be in a good, natural frame & I like the way he naturally steps well under himself.

    I want to also mention a "bit about bits" if you will excuse the pun!!

    The "typical" bit refered to as a "gaited horse bit" is a long shank snaffle, often with a double twisted wire mouth piece. I have absolutely no idea how or why this came about, but around here at least, you will find such a bit in nearly every gaited horse barn. (there are more severe ones, but we won't go there!)

    So, in my experience, I have found gaited horses to work just as easy off a regular loose ring snaffle (IMO), once they are taught how to give to it. There have been a few I have worked with where I just had to go to a tom thumb bit first to help them change. I realize that I may be opening another can of worms here about the tom thumb bit, but I personally have found it to be a gentle bit in soft hands.

    I keep two basic bits in a variety of sizes...first a copper-mouth tom thumb and second an oval-mouth double-jointed snaffle. I use them with every horse I own or have owned, in every breed, and have never found a need to use anything else.

    Of course, if I ever get my warmblood to 4th level, I expect I will need to purchase a double briddle & unbroken, curb bit. However, due to his arthritis & my refusal to inject his joints, I really don't see that as happening any time soon...

    However, I would not want anyone to be surprised to see the bit that is typically (IMO) used on the majority of gaited horses.
         
        12-02-2010, 01:48 AM
      #93
    Foal
    I have a TWH/QH he is amazing to ride so comfterbale anyone could ride him all day with out getting sore gaited horses are so fun!!!
         
        12-02-2010, 01:58 AM
      #94
    Foal
    As for saddles and tack I ride my gaited horse in a western saddle ( roping ) and he does just fine he is 15 hh and healthy weight
         
        12-02-2010, 02:09 AM
      #95
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hrsrdr    
    Ya he looks like he loves his job. Again I think the rider could be more proactive with balancing and I don't think you'd see this horse at any level past maybe 2'9" height but I think he is cute.
    I agree that the horse probably can't go over 2'9" & maybe it should not even be asked of him. I think the rider is constantly thinking "forward, more forward, forward" so doesn't want to give the poor horse mixed messages...the horse does not appear very experienced, but maybe it is at the end of a long day & he is using the last of his reserves???

    Maybe someone could find some more videos of gaited horses jumping & we can see if it is maybe a typical problem ones sees with gaited horses; that is the horse is having a bit of trouble on the aproach & take-off on the jumps. I am not sure if is is a difficult approach (rider error) or if it is a difficulty of the horse to leap easily...
         
        12-02-2010, 10:24 AM
      #96
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by morganslittleleo    
    I have a TWH/QH he is amazing to ride so comfterbale anyone could ride him all day with out getting sore gaited horses are so fun!!!
    Fun is important!! I think there is a lot of misunderstanding about how much joy gaited horses give to people!
         
        12-02-2010, 08:42 PM
      #97
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AnitaAnne    
    I agree that the horse probably can't go over 2'9" & maybe it should not even be asked of him. I think the rider is constantly thinking "forward, more forward, forward" so doesn't want to give the poor horse mixed messages...the horse does not appear very experienced, but maybe it is at the end of a long day & he is using the last of his reserves???

    Maybe someone could find some more videos of gaited horses jumping & we can see if it is maybe a typical problem ones sees with gaited horses; that is the horse is having a bit of trouble on the aproach & take-off on the jumps. I am not sure if is is a difficult approach (rider error) or if it is a difficulty of the horse to leap easily...
    I don't think so...it looks like typical greenie TB with a maybe slightly less confident or capable rider to me. We could look it up though, as I admit it is the first time I've seen a gaited horse jumping.

    Thanks also for all the info...my tendency when I go to ride a gaited horse the first time is probably going to be asking for tack that is the way I ride my horses...snaffle bit, normal english saddle if it fits, etc. But thanks anyway I will keep all that in mind! :)
         
        12-02-2010, 10:11 PM
      #98
    Yearling
    Hrsrdr, you asked about the "big lick" term. It's used exclusively, I think, to refer to the TWH show horses that perform in the heavy stacks of pads and shoes. I've never ridden one, but their riders as you can see from the videos will sit a little hunched over ('turtle backed', if you will). I think this is because the horse is reaching way up underneath them with the hind legs, which drops the hocks lower to the ground and puts the back in a slope downward from withers to tail. In the TWH flat shod shows that I've watched, the TWH show horses (e.g., no pads and light, 'normal' shoes) won't have that dramatic downward slope of the back, and while there are some riders who may sit somewhat 'turtle backed', I don't think it's as much for balance as it is out of habit or style.

    Of course, my TWH is in regular shoes or barefoot, has never been in pads or sored, and I'm riding as centered as I am able in the classical seat and she goes along quite nicely. Her breeder/owner/trainer before me actually started her in a long shank gaited horse bit, which is how he started his horses for the 25-30 years he bred trained his riding horses. He didn't know any different. All she knew how to do when I got her was to go forward, stop, and back. She would turn but she didn't know how to flex her neck, flex at the poll, or round up her back. Amazing. But, she had thousands of miles as a trail horse and was never mistreated, so it was an easy thing to address her training gaps with a few lessons in a snaffle bit.

    I think she was trained and ridden mostly with the rider sitting hunched over, and sometimes when she's really rocking along in the wrong gait I have to ride her like her former owner did, for a few strides, to get her back in gait or smooth her out. I've only had her a couple of years, though, and the longer we are together the better and better she is about being soft and rounded and allowing me to be centered and proper in my seat and leg aids.

    The other thing I can say is that I've seen some gaited fox trotter shows where the riders have that hunched over look, so it's not just with TWH. The fox trotters are often shown in western saddles and the riders seem to ride with heels up (making heel contact on the horse) and toes down, apparently to keep the horse in the gait that they want. Not all of them, but some of them. I don't think it looks comfortable, and I know my legs would get tired if I had to keep heel contact or a leg on to keep my mare in her gait! Being here in Missouri and a member of the regional fox trotter breed association, I hear lots of debate about the need to go back to breeding for the 'foundation' fox trotters characteristics of natural smooth gait, rather than some of the more flashy way of going that the show horses have today. Apparently breeding for bloodlines of the flashy horses has resulted in some of the fox trotters not being able to do a proper fox trot - and their gait may be flashy but it's jarringly rough.

    At the end of the day, I think riding a gaited horse should be easy on the horse and fun for the rider. I have had quarter horses as my riding horses until the past 2-3 years and while I still have them, and love them, I have to say that I am getting a huge kick out of the joy of riding my TWH mare. I have the smooth ride and phenomenal soundness and stamina of a versatile gaited horse and still have a horse that is physically and mentally "teachable" for the things that I like to do on the quarter horses (trail obstacles, side passing, rollbacks, and cantering). We have a blast and I do think she enjoys it, too. My husband says it's the best money we ever spent...
    Dead Rabbit likes this.
         
        12-03-2010, 01:17 AM
      #99
    Weanling
    Thank you, LadyTrails. You explained that very well...you convinced me! Soring is when you rub some type of toxic material on the horse's legs that make them burn so the horse snatches them off the ground, right? How painful! Poor horses; I wonder what idiotic smarty came up with that one. That's as far as you can go with abuse for the sake of looks, IMO. No wonder "big lick" has been used here with disgust.

    So gaited horses can do lateral movements? I suppose it's probably just like doing them at the walk, only faster, correct? Can you do them at the rack or is that like trying to do a side pass at the gallop? It makes sense that they stay sound longer as they don't put concussion on their joints and hooves with that moment of suspension that non-gaited horses have. Are there dressage and jumping shows just for gaited horses?
         
        12-03-2010, 01:34 AM
      #100
    Green Broke
    Gaited dressage!




    ^^^

    Last horse looks pace-y to me. Maybe it's just his speed...
         

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