Can someone explain a gaited horse to me? - Page 12
   

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Can someone explain a gaited horse to me?

This is a discussion on Can someone explain a gaited horse to me? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
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    12-07-2010, 07:24 PM
  #111
Showing
I haven't read all the way through this thread so this may have already been said. Gaited horses aren't trained to gait. They are born with the ability. All of our babies born here (one Peruvian Paso and 2 Rockies) all popped out of there moms and once they got their legs under them they gaited. They also walk, trot, canter and gallop. They just have the extra gears. They can jump, work cattle, do dressage etc. Anything any other horse can do.
     
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    12-07-2010, 11:03 PM
  #112
Yearling
I agree! I've read articles in Equus magazine about conformation (can't remember the author...Dr. Deborah something?). She points out the different mechanical reasons why some breeds of horses are better suited for certain activities. She had a great comment, along the lines of - you can train a horse to do dressage or jumping or whatever, but some horses are just built with more natural ability. For the others, you can get them there but they will be your 'project horses.' And, of course, some of us really like projects!

When you think about it, isn't it awesome that we have this one species of animal with all these different skills? With incredible strength to pull more than twice their own weight (in perfect step with their teammate as if they were one animal, I might add) to floating in dressage, to long distance endurance, to amazing jumping, to gaited glide rides, to just being the trusted babysitter loving on our kids? Counting my blessings to have horses in my life.....
     
    12-08-2010, 09:34 AM
  #113
Yearling
Every horse has a "gait." The trot is a "gait," as is the canter, gallop, walk, rack, etc.

Every horse's intermediate gait (the one we are talking about when talk about "gait") will fall somewhere on the continnum of gait, as discussed above.

So while it's absolutely true that "Gaited horses aren't trained to gait" it's equally true that a huge number of gaited horse owners train their horses to a gait that may or may not be fully "native" to their horse. If you wanted to do another "continuum" you would put the Big Lick Walker on one end. The other end is tougher because the rider can so easily influence how a horse moves by use of their seat; use of the natural aids (hand and leg); artificial aids (boots, chains, etc.); tack choice and position; husbandry (trimming practices); etc.

Then you've got to put the horse in question on the continuum.

Lots of "breed advocates" claim that their breed is "all natural." To test their assertion go to a high level show and watch how they move, are ridden, tacked up, etc. In most instances you have to pretty badly streatch the word "natural" to cover what you see.

And even if it is "natural" it still might be harmful over the short or long term. So just hanging the moniker "natural" on the gait does not always tell us what we need to know.

As a rule there's no problem with "polishing" a gait or moving the horse a short distance on the continuum. Just about any combination of tools can be used to achieve this goal. But the rider has to know what they are about when they do this and use some judgement in the process. Whatever program is used should not cause the horse to become sore or lame, in either the short or long term.

Personally, I react pretty negatively as soon as sombody puts the adjective "natural" in front of some aspect the equine art. The word has become so perverted as to not just mean nothing, but to mean the application of some philosophy that frequently carries with it a lot of "baggage."

G.
     
    12-19-2010, 12:50 AM
  #114
Foal
Saddlebreds are gaited horses that have to be trained to gait. Some saddlebreds are naturally gaited but its not the gait you would see in the show ring because it is pacing. Most gaited saddlebreds that are successful are not naturally gaited.
     
    02-23-2011, 11:27 AM
  #115
Foal
I have Peruvian Horses. They have the following gaits... Walk, Paso Llano/slow and a bit faster,.. and the Sobreandondo. In these gaits they move their feet like a choo choo train.. The front and back legs on the right move forward in unison as the legs on the left move back in unison. They do not have the trotting gene. Nice! They can also Canter, but its a little weird to sit and not necessary as their 3rd gait, Sobreondondo, is fast enough! Fun, smooth and 100% natural! :) (Sorry, Sobreondondo not spelled correct! :/
     
    02-23-2011, 05:13 PM
  #116
Weanling
So are the "paso" gaits different from like a TWH or other gaited horse? What is the footfall pattern in their gaits?
     
    02-27-2011, 04:26 PM
  #117
Foal
I have found this thread very interesting. I have owned my horse for 7 months and he is my first horse. His previous owners sold him to me as a pacer cross. He has an unusual gait, in fact he was at college with his previous owner and the tutors/ trainers said he had ' unique movement '... Sometimes, when he canters he canters only with his front legs and trots incredibly quickly with his back legs. It is very nice to sit to and he hardly moves you out of the saddle. His confirmation is rather poor though. He dishes and plaits and finds it difficult to bend in the corners feeling quite unbalanced. The vet thought he had irish sport horse in him and also some tb too.....regardless of his imperfections he is one top horse....
     
    02-27-2011, 05:10 PM
  #118
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hossifer    
I have found this thread very interesting. I have owned my horse for 7 months and he is my first horse. His previous owners sold him to me as a pacer cross. He has an unusual gait, in fact he was at college with his previous owner and the tutors/ trainers said he had ' unique movement '... Sometimes, when he canters he canters only with his front legs and trots incredibly quickly with his back legs. It is very nice to sit to and he hardly moves you out of the saddle. His confirmation is rather poor though. He dishes and plaits and finds it difficult to bend in the corners feeling quite unbalanced. The vet thought he had irish sport horse in him and also some tb too.....regardless of his imperfections he is one top horse....
It sounds like he inherited the lateral gaits from the pacer side...lateral moving horses do have a hard time with tight turns because it unbalances them, since the both legs on the same side of the body are moving forward (or backward) at the same time...try to make your turns no tighter than a 20 meter circle, this is the way corners are to be ridden in training & 1st level Dressage (if you are familiar with Dressage).

I personally never like to ask a horse to do something that is so difficult based on their personal build or way of moving. For example, I would not ask a shetland pony to carry me (5'8" tall) or jump a 4' fence. Thus I do not recommend Dressage for lateral gaited horses, but as you can read here, many will disagree!

Your horse sounds wonderful to ride, and I personally much prefer a lateral moving horse (gaited breeds) to trail ride...I can ride all day & never get tired! I have found them to be gentle with wonderful temperments & easy keepers too.

So enjoy your horse for the special, unique individual he is!
     
    02-27-2011, 05:25 PM
  #119
Foal
Thank you AnitaAnne.

I do believe that his pacer genes are the more dominant ones. He also holds his tail almost horizontal when cantering. Does this men anything??? I know it can be indicative of a horse in pain but that is def not the case with my boy cos' he always does it. It is normal for him..
     
    02-27-2011, 06:38 PM
  #120
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hossifer    
Thank you AnitaAnne.

I do believe that his pacer genes are the more dominant ones. He also holds his tail almost horizontal when cantering. Does this men anything??? I know it can be indicative of a horse in pain but that is def not the case with my boy cos' he always does it. It is normal for him..
If a horse has a straighter line to the tail, as many gaited horses & breeds like Arabians do, they will hold their tail out like that. Also, horses that have a bit more energy do it too, personally, I like to see the tail held out on horses & I have had several that do it, including my daughter's registered QH mare.

If the tail is held in pain, it often is slightly to one side or the horse "rings" its tail (this can be from anger too).

Paddling is not a fault, however you will notice the shoulders move different on the horse, and I have often noticed that those horses tend to have flatter (mutton) withers. Most Paso Finos paddle, as do many other gaited horses.

You might discover that your horse goes much faster pacing (or racking) than he does at the canter! Keep his shoulders up as you speed up, and it can be both smooth & fast. Very fun to ride!!

A good thing to practice is changing speed within the pace; so in walk you would speed up then slow down without changing out of the walk, do the same with the rack & the canter. This is good training for you both.

I have to go feed the horses now, but enjoy!
     

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