Can someone explain a gaited horse to me? - Page 3
   

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Can someone explain a gaited horse to me?

This is a discussion on Can someone explain a gaited horse to me? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Can a speed racking horse gallop
  • Horse gaited and ungaited

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    11-20-2010, 12:04 PM
  #21
Yearling
Guilherme,

Thanks for the history lesson. Very well put, but I would bet some confusion still exists!

There was probably misunderstanding in my post, because I do not use "gaited" horse & "racking" horse as the same. The term "Racking" horse I use is a registered horse that must gait.

So, yes, some gaited horses do trot & gait, some Racking horses gait & trot, but usually it means they are mixed, as you say, and the usual reason they mix breed is for color.

The Racking horse, around here anyway, is almost always black & the breeders will sell off any that trot & not use them for breeding. Again, they are only mix-breeding them for color, such as the Spotted Saddle horse. Therefore, they maybe show more "pure" horses without the ability to trot.

There are lots of gaited horses in the south, and the breeders do not want to keep any that trot. So in other places you may see a Registered Racking horse trot, but most physically cannot do it.

The ones that are mixed & can trot & gait, the breeders tell me that if it gaits after a walk, it is mixed breed TW or Racking. If it gaits after the trot, it is mixed with Saddlebred.

As far as other countries, that I do not know!
     
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    11-20-2010, 05:11 PM
  #22
Yearling
Just because a horse won't trot doesn't mean it can't. It's not "physically impossible" for any horse to trot.

Nice post Guilherme. I also like the continuum way of explaining gaiting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hrsrdr    
It is not difficult for the horse to do that for a long period of time?
All of the easy gaits take more energy than trotting. But the saddle rack/true rack take much more (and put more strain on the horse) than the running walk and foxtrot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hrsrdr    
Can you jump a gaited horse?
Yes, but whether they continue to gait correctly if you jump them a lot is another question. Jumping and gaiting ask very different things of a horse.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hrsrdr    
Is their canter any different than that of a normal WTC horse?
It can be. Some gaited horses do a "rocking chair" canter which has more up and down movement. Here's a video:

     
    11-20-2010, 10:01 PM
  #23
Yearling
Here's one of a foal gaiting. It is all natural...


Speed racking...

     
    11-20-2010, 10:34 PM
  #24
Yearling
Here's another one that shows the gait of the Racking horse well.

Something else about them, they are usually very good natured horses. Even little kids can show the stallions around here. You can load up stallions & mares in the same trailer, no problem.

     
    11-21-2010, 08:02 AM
  #25
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by ponyboy    
That book is by Lee Ziegler not Liz Graves. And to avoid sounding like a know-it-all, I'm just going to refer those with questions to that book since some inaccurate things have been posted here.

The thing you have to understand is that it wasn't until very recently that gaited horses were studied scientifically. There are still many myths about them so you have to be careful where you get your info from. The book Easy-Gaited Horses is regarded as the Bible on the subject.
And I knew better than that -- my apologies That needed corrected

I see there's still a lot of debate going on that could last until the proverbial cows come in for milking, so I will only reiterate your comment that "Easy-Gaited Horses" is, indeed, regarded as the Bible on the subject.
     
    11-25-2010, 01:21 PM
  #26
Weanling
Guilherme-thank you for the awesome post; it was very informative and professional!

And thank you pony boy for the video...now I know why I confused someone in a previous post when I mentioned that a horse I rode had a "rocking horse" canter. I said it in reference to the horse having a lot of suspension and lightness of the forehand when he cantered...I'd heard the term before and didn't know when else you would apply it. Now I know! :)

The rack is amazing...what is the footfall pattern on that? In AnitaAnne's 2nd video, at 3:12, he started going faster and it looked more like a canter...same thing in the second racking video at 1:10. Like it went from being even footfall to leading a little with one foreleg and it looked faster. Did he change gaits or just increase speed? How is a rack to ride? Is it as fast as a gallop?

Again, sorry for the constant questions...this is just all so fascinating to me as I have always experienced just normal, ungaited horses...how different they are! Especially about the temperments that you mentioned, AnitaAnne...were they bred specifically for temperment and manageability? Have gaited horses always existed, or how did that start?
     
    11-25-2010, 06:09 PM
  #27
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrsrdr    
The rack is amazing...what is the footfall pattern on that?
It's the same as the walk. The difference is that the horse picks up both legs on one side together.

Quote:
In AnitaAnne's 2nd video, at 3:12, he started going faster and it looked more like a canter...same thing in the second racking video at 1:10. Like it went from being even footfall to leading a little with one foreleg and it looked faster. Did he change gaits or just increase speed?
I'm not sure... Possibly the horse changed to a step pace which is uneven 4 beats.

Quote:
Is it as fast as a gallop?
It's about 13 - 25 mph.

Quote:
Especially about the temperments that you mentioned, AnitaAnne...were they bred specifically for temperment and manageability?
Yes, temperament is a bigger focus in gaited breeds than in normal breeds. However people have different ideas about what a good temperament is.

Quote:
Have gaited horses always existed, or how did that start?
Some scholars believe that the word "palfrey," which was used in medieval times, meant a gaited horse. Palfreys are known as being "lady's horses" but knights also rode them for traveling long distances. They were expensive horses.
     
    11-25-2010, 09:15 PM
  #28
Weanling
Hmmm...interesting! Wow; this thread is almost better than Pony Club! Thanks so much to everyone who has contributed...further posts always welcome, of course.
     
    11-25-2010, 09:40 PM
  #29
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrsrdr    
Guilherme-thank you for the awesome post; it was very informative and professional!

And thank you pony boy for the video...now I know why I confused someone in a previous post when I mentioned that a horse I rode had a "rocking horse" canter. I said it in reference to the horse having a lot of suspension and lightness of the forehand when he cantered...I'd heard the term before and didn't know when else you would apply it. Now I know! :)

The rack is amazing...what is the footfall pattern on that? In AnitaAnne's 2nd video, at 3:12, he started going faster and it looked more like a canter...same thing in the second racking video at 1:10. Like it went from being even footfall to leading a little with one foreleg and it looked faster. Did he change gaits or just increase speed? How is a rack to ride? Is it as fast as a gallop?

Again, sorry for the constant questions...this is just all so fascinating to me as I have always experienced just normal, ungaited horses...how different they are! Especially about the temperments that you mentioned, AnitaAnne...were they bred specifically for temperment and manageability? Have gaited horses always existed, or how did that start?
I did not see either horse break gait. The gaited horse canter is typically kind of slow. Many are not allowed to canter. It is a 4 beat, lateral canter, so the foot fall looks similar, but there is suspension in the canter.

They can go very, very fast & I have found that they tend to go faster & farther when you do a lot of fast work on them.

As far as history goes, they originate from the driving horses. When you drive in a cart, it can be very bouncy when a horse trots. The pace is much smoother due to the lack of suspension. Plus they seem to be faster, at least the standardbred drivers say they are faster! If you watch standardbred racing, you will see many of them with a special strap on their legs (the name escapes me right now) which will identify the pacers from the trotters.

So, in the south there were huge plantations & the horses here were bred to ride all day at a comfortable gait, but they wanted them to move quickly & to be rather intimidating to people on the ground.

Thus they developed horses that are high headed & full of speed, but are generally 'easy keepers" and easy to train & handle. I have found them to be very willing and don't seem to have power struggles with people. They really are not sensitive like hot blooded horse. (I have found Saddlebreds to be generally hotter than Racking horses or Tennessee Walking horses).

I love riding a gaited horse on trail rides the best! You can ride all day & not get tired, and the horse will go as long as you ask! You can jump small jumps with them, but generally this is not the horse you would pick for serious jumping.

It is not good to ride them in small circles though, if you noticed in most of the clips the riders are generally going in straight lines.
     
    11-25-2010, 09:53 PM
  #30
Yearling
One more thing, the rider! You will notice that the saddle is set back farther than in English or western. Also the rider sits back in a chair seat, the correct position. Some you will see really thrusting their feet forward, which helps the rider to sit back & help the horse work off his hind end. The hands are held higher than most other styles, except maybe some upper level eventers trying to slow their horses...

You will also notice that the riders are not using any leg at all & the hands are generally very quiet. To ride, you sit back then pick up on the reins to lift the head & shoulders & go! Often the horse will sart going as soon as you pick up on the reins. Generally you think of this as "setting the horses head" or "putting them in a headset".

One more thing, the horses are usually trained to "park out" for the rider to mount. This means that the horse's back legs are stretched out way behind them with lowers the horses back & makes it easier to mount. I have found that a 15 hand racking horse feels much smaller than a 15 hand QH, so a tall rider would want one about 16 hands or so.
     

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