Can you post on a gaited horse?
   

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Can you post on a gaited horse?

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    11-28-2012, 10:46 AM
  #1
Started
Can you post on a gaited horse?

I have my pinto mare, who I have been trying to figure out her legs since I got her a year ago.....

She has been started this summer just mostly riding around for short periods of time and getting used to carrying a rider. Now I have started arena work with her having her hold a walk and a trot for more than the few steps she was before. She is doing great, but I am not sure if her trot is a trot! You can sit it very easily and it is not easy to try and post. She is holding her neck low like a jog and very relaxed. But I just don't think it is in a normal two-beat gait. I am going to try and have someone, who is not a horse person, video tape her today.

In the past, while I tried to figure out her legs just from watching her run in the pasture and short lunging sessions, it seemed as if her front and hind legs weren't in sync with eachother and had their own agendas. Vet said she just needed to get coordinated, strengthen and learn to balance. She is some type of draft/paint cross and maybe her mechanics are just messed up?

So, I am wondering, if you have a gaited horse, how do you tell if it is in fact gaited if you don't know what breed it may be?
     
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    11-28-2012, 11:13 AM
  #2
Foal
I have a rocky mountain gelding and in the past had a Missouri fox trotter. It is really hard to post a gait as the movement is not up and down and doesn't help lift you out of the saddle as does a trot. There are Many different types og gaiting and few of the look the same but you can tell them from a trot by watching how many feet are on the ground at a time. A trot will always have two feet on the ground at one time where a gait will have either 1 or 3. A trot is an up and down motion and a gait is more side to side or front to back, but.much less up and down. Makes it hard to post.

Hope that helps...if you could video tape her we could look and probably tell.

Cheers
Les
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    11-28-2012, 11:28 AM
  #3
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by LesandLily    
I have a rocky mountain gelding and in the past had a Missouri fox trotter. It is really hard to post a gait as the movement is not up and down and doesn't help lift you out of the saddle as does a trot. There are Many different types og gaiting and few of the look the same but you can tell them from a trot by watching how many feet are on the ground at a time. A trot will always have two feet on the ground at one time where a gait will have either 1 or 3. A trot is an up and down motion and a gait is more side to side or front to back, but.much less up and down. Makes it hard to post.

Hope that helps...if you could video tape her we could look and probably tell.

Cheers
Les
Thanks! Yes, that makes sense...there really isn't a rythm really to post to. What if it's almost like a trot but the hind and front legs don't land quite at the same time? It's like the legs are moving almost in the two-beat gait together, but one touches down just slightly ahead of the other? Then maybe it's still a balance thing?
     
    11-28-2012, 11:30 AM
  #4
Green Broke
That's how some gaited horses move - 4 beats. Many (most?) don't trot and aren't encouraged to. Why get a gaited horse if you want a trotter?

Anyway sounds like she's trying to do a running walk.
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    11-28-2012, 11:44 AM
  #5
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by DancingArabian    
That's how some gaited horses move - 4 beats. Many (most?) don't trot and aren't encouraged to. Why get a gaited horse if you want a trotter?

Anyway sounds like she's trying to do a running walk.
Posted via Mobile Device
Interesting....I will try and video later so I can see what her legs are doing. It doesn't matter if she is gaited or not to me, I just would like to know which she is so I know what her legs are doing! It is very comfortable to sit though. I will say though, when she goes back to a walk, it is quite animated though, like her hips just swing out. Hmmmm....everyone who has seen her is baffled.
     
    11-28-2012, 11:50 AM
  #6
Foal
Personally I have all of my gaited horses trot. They have been at least four gaited with my Rocky having five as he has a fast gait and a slow gait. I think they learn to balance themselves better when they learn how to trot and so far all of their gaits have improved after learning to trot. Granted it does take some work to get them back to gaiting effectively after learning to trot but all it takes is patience and time.

If it is smooth and the horse is balanced well I don't know that you need to change anything. It may be a gait or just your horses way of moving...the big thing is balance and making sure they are not interfering with themselves.

Cheers!
Les
     
    11-29-2012, 10:13 PM
  #7
Started
Ok, thanks guys....I don't see gaiting in the video from today. I just see bad conformation and it looks as if her hind legs are crossing over at times and maybe she is base narrow? So, she must clip herself and throw herself off balance or something. Here are the videos if you are interested anyway....


Video of her walking from last year....

     
    11-30-2012, 08:41 AM
  #8
Weanling
Concur with your assessment.

The trot is a bit "shambling" but it appears to still be a true trot.

G.
     
    11-30-2012, 10:54 AM
  #9
Foal
2 things stand out to me. First is that she has a nice soft WP style jog. I can see how that would be easy to sit. Lots of riders and horses work hours trying to get a jog like that! Secondly it looks like to me she is pulling with her front end and not driving with her back end. Was she injured at some point...she looks to me like she is short stepping with her right hind which is causing her HQs to kind of swing back and forth. She doesn't look out of synch or like she is interferring with herself at all though. How is she at a lope? Pretty mare though!

Cheers!
Les
     
    11-30-2012, 11:47 AM
  #10
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by LesandLily    
2 things stand out to me. First is that she has a nice soft WP style jog. I can see how that would be easy to sit. Lots of riders and horses work hours trying to get a jog like that! Secondly it looks like to me she is pulling with her front end and not driving with her back end. Was she injured at some point...she looks to me like she is short stepping with her right hind which is causing her HQs to kind of swing back and forth. She doesn't look out of synch or like she is interferring with herself at all though. How is she at a lope? Pretty mare though!

Cheers!
Les
Thanks Les-
Yes, she is a VERY laid back and comical horse....maybe the draft in her. She has just been started under saddle and really has no cares in the world, aims to please.

I adopted her as a two year old last December. Came from a questionable environment. I was told her sire was a black and white spotted draft and dam was a buckskin paint. When I had the vet do a pre-purchase exam on her due to the noticable back end wobbles....the vet said she may have been just going through a growing spurt and with her being part draft could be how she is. Owner said she had no injuries and just needed to grow into her legs.

She has filled out quite a bit since then and her legs have gotten better somewhat. No more bunny hops when she lopes and no more clipping her front feet with the hind. Her tripping over herself is not as frequent. So, I am hoping that continuing to build strength and balance along with her maturing will solve most of the issue. I don't expect her to be a perfect show horse, I love her how she is, but I want to be sure that I will be safe riding her and I'm not hurting her. I have not loped her yet since I want to establish a strong foundation in the trot. I'm in no hurry. I'm also not an extremely advanced rider in the lope so I want to be sure her and I are both ready with minimal acrobatics.

Thanks for the nice words. She is a joy to have.
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