Can you post on a gaited horse? - Page 2
 
 

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Can you post on a gaited horse?

This is a discussion on Can you post on a gaited horse? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Do you post on icelandics in a trot
  • Gaited horse bunny hopping at canter

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    11-30-2012, 12:56 PM
  #11
Trained
I have owned about 8 gaited or 1/2 gaited horses and they all gaited. They all will trot, too in the pasture at liberty. I see it every week in my back yard. Funny, but my KMHSA, who has "UNKNOWN" 4 and 5 generations back (dam side) has yet to trot under saddle, and I've owned her since 2008. My 6yo KMH gelding has trotted under saddle, and it's not pleasant. One of the last times was when we were crossing a creek numerous times at a CW event and I was using this obstacle to settle his nerves. I had to post it, though I've trained myself to sit some pretty rough trots and can do so when required.
Two of the TWH's I've owned would occasionally trot under saddle. I've maintained that a TWH or TWH cross will take out their anger under saddle by performing a trot or a "broken washing machine" gait. Certainly preferable to bucking or bolting! When "Tyke" (1970-1998, RIP, TWH/Qh cross) didn't like what you were doing, he would trot. He often trotted when being ridden for lessons and he didn't care for the work, such as jumping cavaletti with a novice.
I suspect bc of his size, that there is a LOT of TWH in my 6yo KMH gelding. Periodically, he trots during schooling, so I just post. He came to me with some fragile confidence and they'll be plenty of time to discourage the trotting in lieu of ambling...or, maybe, "run-walking."
During the amble or the running walk you could post it, but the pace is so quick you would soon wear out. Better to just enjoy a comfortable gait. It doesn't hurt them to have to you sit it, unlike a young or out of shape older horse, or posting bc your horse hasn't warmed up yet.
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    11-30-2012, 01:02 PM
  #12
Foal
That's good to hear. You may try doing some exercises with her to help build her balance and her hindquarters. I am a "get out of the arena / RP" kind of guy so I usually go to the woods to work on different issues plus it gets your horse better broke. My Rocky had issues with loping as the people had him before wanted him as a gaited show horse so he was NEVER allowed to lope or trot...only gait. Poor guy, his feet went every which way whenever I would put pressure on him. I got him over that by starting on the lunge line in the arena until he had it figured out and was smooth in both lope and trot.

Then I took him outside and lunged him across ditches, on sidehills, over obstacles, up and down hills. Whatever I could think of to help his balance and get him to drive with his hindquarters. The first few sessions were pretty ugly but he figured it out pretty quick and really muscled him up and really helped his balance. I am sure there are arena exercises you could do too but I tend to go the outdoors as it is more fun for both. Once she is comfortable on the line and her balance has improved, I would ride her over the same obstacles, concentrating on getting her to drive with the back end by sitting straight in the saddle and driving her with your seat and legs. Doing all of this really helped Leaf's balance and got him to the point where I can really ride him pretty much anywhere. Good luck and have fun!

Cheers!
Les
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    11-30-2012, 01:03 PM
  #13
Foal
Sorry double post
     
    11-30-2012, 04:13 PM
  #14
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by LesandLily    
That's good to hear. You may try doing some exercises with her to help build her balance and her hindquarters. I am a "get out of the arena / RP" kind of guy so I usually go to the woods to work on different issues plus it gets your horse better broke. My Rocky had issues with loping as the people had him before wanted him as a gaited show horse so he was NEVER allowed to lope or trot...only gait. Poor guy, his feet went every which way whenever I would put pressure on him. I got him over that by starting on the lunge line in the arena until he had it figured out and was smooth in both lope and trot.

Then I took him outside and lunged him across ditches, on sidehills, over obstacles, up and down hills. Whatever I could think of to help his balance and get him to drive with his hindquarters. The first few sessions were pretty ugly but he figured it out pretty quick and really muscled him up and really helped his balance. I am sure there are arena exercises you could do too but I tend to go the outdoors as it is more fun for both. Once she is comfortable on the line and her balance has improved, I would ride her over the same obstacles, concentrating on getting her to drive with the back end by sitting straight in the saddle and driving her with your seat and legs. Doing all of this really helped Leaf's balance and got him to the point where I can really ride him pretty much anywhere. Good luck and have fun!

Cheers!
Les
Excellent advice and I am planning on doing just that. We just moved to San Diego from the Central Valley of CA a few weeks ago. I've been trying to get my two acclimated to their new surroundings. They are not used to hills since it was totally flat where we came from. So, this is so exciting now! We have trails everywhere through the hills all the way to the beach. I will continue with things like you mentioned and hopefully it will help!
     
    11-30-2012, 06:01 PM
  #15
Foal
Hope you figure it out...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhorselady    
Thanks! Yes, that makes sense...there really isn't a rythm really to post to. What if it's almost like a trot but the hind and front legs don't land quite at the same time? It's like the legs are moving almost in the two-beat gait together, but one touches down just slightly ahead of the other? Then maybe it's still a balance thing?
Is she pacing, or doing a "running pace"? My TWH gaits and trots (and canters), and there is no need to post a good gait, as it is sooooo smooth. When he is trotting, it is easy to post (plenty of bounce...wish there was less, in fact, but he looks gorgeous when he's trotting!)
     
    11-30-2012, 10:01 PM
  #16
Started
Blkgryphon...I think she is just trotting, at least for now. I took her out on trails today. She did wonderful. Six border patrol officers came whizzing around the corner on their 4-wheelers with masks and helmets on and I braced for the worst. She was cool as a cumcumber. She went up and down some hills and through woods on narrow trails with canopy overhead. Did great. Found some places to lunge her that were sloped....I noticed her legs even more then. :( Almost like that rt hind one is a peg leg and stiff or pops and gives out maybe. Noticed her stifles pop as we went down hills. :( So, I will continue on this journey with her. Whether it is conformation or neurological, it doesn't matter. She will be a great walking, lightly trotted trail horse for me. Only time will tell if it improves. But, it has improved somewhat since last year, so now that we have trails and hills she will strengthen and finish growing and I will see a change.
     
    12-08-2012, 10:12 AM
  #17
Showing
With the running walk the hind touches the ground while the forelimb on the same side is bent. With the pace both hind and front strike at the same time. I am seeing a definite running walk. Also her back is relaxed as it is swinging nicely. Enjoy.
     
    12-08-2012, 11:41 AM
  #18
Foal
Okay, I am probably over-sensitive since I just put a horse down to Wobbler's Syndrome, but your describing the same symptoms my horse had. Bunny-hopping at the canter, stumbling, not using the back end, dragging with the front, one hind leg looking off, etc. are all symptoms. Her naturally slow jog is also suspicious, laziness is another symptom. My horse would improve with exercise, but the problems never went away. If your horse has it, at some point she will start falling down, when turned out *and* when you're riding her. A basic neurological test is easy and a vet can do it any time. I honestly hope this isn't the problem, (and I'm probably over-reacting) she looks like a nice one.

I have posted on gaited horses, mainly on the ones who paced. I've also posted on Fox Trotters, the gait they're breeding now is more of a bouncy slick-trot than a smooth fox trot. And there have been a handful of trotting horses in the past who had such smooth trots that it was an effort to post. My Icelandic does this when he trots slowly, but I can tell he's not tolting.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhorselady    
Thanks Les-
Yes, she is a VERY laid back and comical horse....maybe the draft in her. She has just been started under saddle and really has no cares in the world, aims to please.

I adopted her as a two year old last December. Came from a questionable environment. I was told her sire was a black and white spotted draft and dam was a buckskin paint. When I had the vet do a pre-purchase exam on her due to the noticable back end wobbles....the vet said she may have been just going through a growing spurt and with her being part draft could be how she is. Owner said she had no injuries and just needed to grow into her legs.

She has filled out quite a bit since then and her legs have gotten better somewhat. No more bunny hops when she lopes and no more clipping her front feet with the hind. Her tripping over herself is not as frequent. So, I am hoping that continuing to build strength and balance along with her maturing will solve most of the issue. I don't expect her to be a perfect show horse, I love her how she is, but I want to be sure that I will be safe riding her and I'm not hurting her. I have not loped her yet since I want to establish a strong foundation in the trot. I'm in no hurry. I'm also not an extremely advanced rider in the lope so I want to be sure her and I are both ready with minimal acrobatics.

Thanks for the nice words. She is a joy to have.
     
    12-24-2012, 08:23 PM
  #19
Started
I am hopefully reviving this thread..since I have moved on to trail riding my mare. I have come to notice that when she picks up the pace at a walk that it is VERY rough. I feel like I am riding in a car with someone that is learning how to drive stick shift! Her hips are swaying all over the place. Her head is low like a western pleasure horse for the most part, not upright and hollow backed. In asking and researching, I have heard that this is a common trait riding gaited horses until they get into their gait. And, since I am still trying to figure out what kind of goofy horse I have, I am wondering if this would sound familiar to people who own gaited horses? Her jog/gait is smooth as butter, but her walk....oy! If anyone has seen any of the videos that I've posted, with her in the jog...you can see it when she comes down to the walk, I think.
     
    12-24-2012, 08:32 PM
  #20
Started
Also, would that be what is called a 'camel walk'?
     

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