Can you post on a gaited horse? - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds > Gaited Horses

Can you post on a gaited horse?

This is a discussion on Can you post on a gaited horse? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Camel walk horses
  • Can you post on a gaited horse

Like Tree6Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    12-25-2012, 01:13 AM
  #21
Green Broke
Camel walk is a pace. What you described for the back end sounds like it could be a pace and they can do that at any head angle. But, head up and hollow backed is not proper for gaiting, usually that leads to them pacing.

If you can get a video of your horse we can take a look to try and determine what is going on.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    12-25-2012, 01:33 AM
  #22
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darrin    
Camel walk is a pace. What you described for the back end sounds like it could be a pace and they can do that at any head angle. But, head up and hollow backed is not proper for gaiting, usually that leads to them pacing.

If you can get a video of your horse we can take a look to try and determine what is going on.
Lol...this gets me more confused as I go! I will try and get a video on the next trail ride. I'm new at the gaiting thing and learning, I thought.
     
    12-25-2012, 01:37 AM
  #23
Started
From what I understand though....the pace looks like a two-beat gait? If so, I don't think that is it. I think she is still doing a four-beat gait during this. I think it still may just be her...at the jog she can, at times, put her rear foot just after her front foot touches the ground, instead of at the same time. So, her walk is probably messed up too.
     
    12-25-2012, 02:37 AM
  #24
Started
I would say that my mare's walk resembles the flat walk of the horse in this video...

     
    12-25-2012, 08:38 AM
  #25
Foal
Oldhorselady, your little lady isn't messed up, she's in great hands with you lol... I didn't know jazz was gaited when I bought her. Wasn't until she was being worked at 2.5 years old that I noticed she was doing this odd thing before she trotted. I asked my trainer why is jazzy race walking like my neighbor does? I was laughing BC it just looked so funny! She rudely explained jazz was gaited and it was "bad". So that night I bought a book on gaited horses, got totally confused bt new I loved this gaited "thing", so I fired the trainer and spent 3 days trying to count hoof beats!! 1.2.3.4.

And she still throws in a new gait/shuffle/beat every so often, just to keep me confused enough!
     
    12-25-2012, 09:35 AM
  #26
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herdof2    
Oldhorselady, your little lady isn't messed up, she's in great hands with you lol... I didn't know jazz was gaited when I bought her. Wasn't until she was being worked at 2.5 years old that I noticed she was doing this odd thing before she trotted. I asked my trainer why is jazzy race walking like my neighbor does? I was laughing BC it just looked so funny! She rudely explained jazz was gaited and it was "bad". So that night I bought a book on gaited horses, got totally confused bt new I loved this gaited "thing", so I fired the trainer and spent 3 days trying to count hoof beats!! 1.2.3.4.

And she still throws in a new gait/shuffle/beat every so often, just to keep me confused enough!
Thanks Herdof2. I hope to get some kind of real answer in 2013...lol! If I could say that that is definitely what it is, it would make me very happy. Everyone who sees her is just at a loss. She has several possibilities right now...gaited, green, injured as a foal, growing, neurological and the mix she is crossed with making her odd. The vet(s) ruled out neurological. Even though it still sits in the back of my mind, I'm thinking 'no' as well. She passes all the tests. She has improved since last year. She used to bunny hop all the time at the canter and even trot. It was like she didn't know what to do with her legs. She no longer bunny hops. So, I continue on this journey.
Herdof2 likes this.
     
    12-25-2012, 10:19 AM
  #27
Green Broke
Well if she can flat walk she can running walk. What you could be getting is a horse that is totally confused in her gaits so trying to do a couple different things at the same time, that usually leads to crossfiring and a rough ride. Now, if she is gaited you want to stop trotting her and just work on her gait as that wont help. The other thing is gaiting takes building up the proper muscles, if those muscles are not strong it leads to going into/out of gait.

Show one of your friends the video you posted and point out what a proper 4 beat gait looks like. Hop on your mare and dog walk, that's a slow walk, have your friend watch and see what her feet are doing. It should look just like the flat walk but slower, front foot should barely get out of the way before her back foot lands. Also watch to see if the back foot lands behind, same place or in front of where her front foot was. Walkers should put their back foot in front of where their front foot landed, this is called overstep.

If it looks like she is gaiting then it's time to start working on her gait. First, dog walk her until you both are sick of it then dog walk some more. This is to build up the proper muscles for gaiting, gaiting is work and they need to be conditioned to do it. While working her dog walk I would do two things. Buy a couple books on training walkers to read and look for a walker trainer that can give you some lessons on one that is set in their gait already. I also suggest sending her to a walker trainer for a month or so as neither of you know what a gait is by the sounds of it. You can do it on your own but it will take a lot longer and you may never getting her 100% gaiting right.
     
    12-25-2012, 11:28 AM
  #28
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darrin    
Well if she can flat walk she can running walk. What you could be getting is a horse that is totally confused in her gaits so trying to do a couple different things at the same time, that usually leads to crossfiring and a rough ride. Now, if she is gaited you want to stop trotting her and just work on her gait as that wont help. The other thing is gaiting takes building up the proper muscles, if those muscles are not strong it leads to going into/out of gait.

Show one of your friends the video you posted and point out what a proper 4 beat gait looks like. Hop on your mare and dog walk, that's a slow walk, have your friend watch and see what her feet are doing. It should look just like the flat walk but slower, front foot should barely get out of the way before her back foot lands. Also watch to see if the back foot lands behind, same place or in front of where her front foot was. Walkers should put their back foot in front of where their front foot landed, this is called overstep.

If it looks like she is gaiting then it's time to start working on her gait. First, dog walk her until you both are sick of it then dog walk some more. This is to build up the proper muscles for gaiting, gaiting is work and they need to be conditioned to do it. While working her dog walk I would do two things. Buy a couple books on training walkers to read and look for a walker trainer that can give you some lessons on one that is set in their gait already. I also suggest sending her to a walker trainer for a month or so as neither of you know what a gait is by the sounds of it. You can do it on your own but it will take a lot longer and you may never getting her 100% gaiting right.
Oy, I have a lot to learn...wow. There is someone who owns a Rocky Mountain at our barn...maybe she should help. We just moved down here and I'm still learning everyone here, so eventually I should find someone with a gaited horse. Does a Rocky Mountain Horse have the same type of gaits you are describing? Oh, there is another owner who has Icelandics here....

I had a trainer look at her the other day when I was trying to trot her, but she just stays at a job really....VERY smooth. The trainer was baffled, but maybe she is not experienced with gaited horses? I have recently seen her riding someone else's Tennessee Walker for training though.
     
    12-25-2012, 02:45 PM
  #29
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darrin    
Well if she can flat walk she can running walk. What you could be getting is a horse that is totally confused in her gaits so trying to do a couple different things at the same time, that usually leads to crossfiring and a rough ride. Now, if she is gaited you want to stop trotting her and just work on her gait as that wont help. The other thing is gaiting takes building up the proper muscles, if those muscles are not strong it leads to going into/out of gait.

Show one of your friends the video you posted and point out what a proper 4 beat gait looks like. Hop on your mare and dog walk, that's a slow walk, have your friend watch and see what her feet are doing. It should look just like the flat walk but slower, front foot should barely get out of the way before her back foot lands. Also watch to see if the back foot lands behind, same place or in front of where her front foot was. Walkers should put their back foot in front of where their front foot landed, this is called overstep.

If it looks like she is gaiting then it's time to start working on her gait. First, dog walk her until you both are sick of it then dog walk some more. This is to build up the proper muscles for gaiting, gaiting is work and they need to be conditioned to do it. While working her dog walk I would do two things. Buy a couple books on training walkers to read and look for a walker trainer that can give you some lessons on one that is set in their gait already. I also suggest sending her to a walker trainer for a month or so as neither of you know what a gait is by the sounds of it. You can do it on your own but it will take a lot longer and you may never getting her 100% gaiting right.
Would it be easier watching her while leading....or just under saddle?
     
    12-25-2012, 03:10 PM
  #30
Foal
You live in my neck of the woods. If you have a trailer there is a gaited horse trainer that does lessons in Anza , it would be worth the drive to get some professional help. I also have my first gaited horse and even though I have been riding all my life, gaited horses are different. It helped 100% to have a trained set of eyes on the ground. Let me know if you want her name.
     

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0