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Chances of getting a gaited foal out of a non gaited mare?

This is a discussion on Chances of getting a gaited foal out of a non gaited mare? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category

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        07-03-2014, 07:13 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    Yeah, I read about non gaited horses producing foals that gait, so it brought up my curiosity, and I had to ask. I remember reading about horses being trained out of gait, which is a shame if it's natural. My gaited mare will trot too if asked.
         
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        07-03-2014, 08:06 PM
      #12
    Trained
    If your mare carries a gene for gaiting, you have a 50% chance of getting a gaited foal. If she comes totally from nongaited lines, she has no chance of having a gaited foal. It is most likely a straight recessive gene. I did breed a TWH to an Arab, and the foal, though nongaited, was a very nice horse with a smooth trot.
    Elizabeth Bowers likes this.
         
        07-04-2014, 08:51 AM
      #13
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Celeste    
    If your mare carries a gene for gaiting, you have a 50% chance of getting a gaited foal. If she comes totally from nongaited lines, she has no chance of having a gaited foal. It is most likely a straight recessive gene. I did breed a TWH to an Arab, and the foal, though nongaited, was a very nice horse with a smooth trot.
    This presumes that there is a single gene for gaiting. I'm not sure that has been proven at this point.

    Gait exists on a continuum. It is a series of positions on a line between the true trot and the true pace. Put another way, it's a "non trot." So maybe the scientists should look for a trotting gene vice a "gait" gene?

    To visualize gait, draw a line on a piece of paper, maybe eight inches long. On the right end of the line make a mark and label it “trot.” On the left end make a mark and label it “pace.” In the center make a mark and label it “center gait.” Now we have a “template” where we can place the different ways of going of the different types of gaited horses. This will allow a comparison without getting lost in breed-specific terminology. It also calls into question the existence of a "gait" gene.

    We North Americans are mostly familiar with laterally gaited horses. That may skew a lot of thinking. In reality there are also soft diagonal gaits. Does the same gene cause these? Is there a different gene? Or is there no gene at all for gait but rather one for the trot? Personally, I don't know. But the questions are valid.

    G.
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        07-04-2014, 10:06 AM
      #14
    Trained
    Yes the questions are valid. Some research supports the idea that gaiting is a single gene. I think it is just from seeing many crossbred offspring of TWH and Paso Fino horses that were not naturally gaited. I have never seen a complete outcross that had the natural gait. I agree that the jury is still out and it is not that simple.

    Horse gait traced to single mutation : Nature News & Comment
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        07-04-2014, 11:00 AM
      #15
    Showing
    Interesting info on mutation. I had a mare with a walk as distinct as a good TWH walk, yet would trot instead of a running walk. She was 1/4 TWH. She also carried arab and qh. At a show I watched a tall Arabian pacing both at the walk and when asked for the jog in a wp class. Apparently it was registered so no gaited breeding in the back ground.
         
        07-04-2014, 12:21 PM
      #16
    Green Broke
    I have a gelding by a Quarter Horse stallion out of a Missouri Fox Trotter mare.

    I really can't black and white tell you if he is "gaited." I think he has a fox trot as I have felt it a couple of times and seen it in the round pen when he is lazy and doesn't quite move up to a trot. However, under saddle, he walks and trots like a Quarter Horse 99% of the time.

    I'm sure I've felt a gait and I think a gait could be developed, but his natural inclination is just to go right through it and do a regular trot.

    I have been working on just making him a good trail horse and not worried about the gait at this point. I may never worry about the gait. If I can turn him into a reliable trail mount, that is my ultimate goal. But I think someone who knew how to train gaited horses could get him fox trotting.

    He's a 4 yr old this year. He was very lateral as a young foal but I hear that is somewhat normal for foals, even non-gaited.
    Attached Images
    File Type: jpg zane gait small.jpg (66.5 KB, 52 views)
    File Type: jpg Zane small.jpg (92.2 KB, 51 views)
    Elizabeth Bowers likes this.
         
        07-06-2014, 06:10 AM
      #17
    Foal
    What a beauty Trailhorserider! The cross turned out very nicely :)
         
        07-06-2014, 11:21 AM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Interesting thread... Love the pics, trailhorserider!
         
        07-07-2014, 10:02 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    Thanks guys!

    I love showing him off.
         
        07-14-2014, 03:50 PM
      #20
    Yearling
    Interesting read, and nice pics! Thanks everyone. I know if I bred my gaited mare to a non-gaited stallion, I would probably have a better chance of getting a gaited foal, she proved herself once with a gaited mule colt. But there would still be the chance of a non-gaited foal emerging.
    Fascinating!
         

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