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clacking hooves

This is a discussion on clacking hooves within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • How to.stop a.young walking horse from forging

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    10-13-2012, 09:39 PM
  #21
Trained
We posted at the same time. I ride an Arab, but I don't see how a walking horse can hurt your back. I've ridden both.
     
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    10-13-2012, 09:43 PM
  #22
Weanling
I'll try to remeber to take some photos


Heres what I was told by my ridding buddy. He's old school now. I asked him about the clacking sound and he told me, that he always was told that when they clacked their hooves together, that meant you had a real good horse.

Kinda puts me in mind of the movie waterboy with adam sandler. When asked why alligators had such a bad aggressive attitude (i think that's the question) he replied that mamma says its because they have a bad toothache.
     
    10-13-2012, 09:55 PM
  #23
Trained
How does his gait feel? Is he willing to move out? Does he seem sound? Those are probably the most important questions.
     
    10-13-2012, 10:14 PM
  #24
Foal
I think it depends on the kind of injury. My experience on racking horses is they rock you to the back while a trotting horse swings you side to side. I would guess it has something to do with the direction of the motion that causes back pain. For me a gaited horse rocks me back on my tailbone . . . If I ride for more then a few minutes my legs go numb, but I can ride a trotter for an extended time with no discomfort. I think because I'm rocking from seat bone to seat bone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Celeste    
We posted at the same time. I ride an Arab, but I don't see how a walking horse can hurt your back. I've ridden both.
     
    10-13-2012, 10:17 PM
  #25
Weanling
Well my experience is limited to her. So my riding could be affecting her. But its not always the smoothest. I can't sit rock steady all the time like I see others doing. Im wondering if she's isnt a little pacey. But I don't know.

Im told by that she looks fine. So it could be me. And she's very sound. Yes she very willing to move out. Not the fastest. But she likes to go. Course going down a grade she really slows down, or a very rocky path. I just let her go her pace.



This is her. GINGER. 6 yr old reg. Walking mare. This was the first day I got her. Back in July I believe it was. This is at at my riding partners place. She's about 10 mins up the road from me.
     
    10-13-2012, 10:36 PM
  #26
Trained
I woulda thought the gaited breeds would be better for an injury like this.

I know a fella that refuses to ride a walking horse cause the back and forth motion hurts his back. So he rides a quarter horse.............imagine that???[/QUOTE]

It depends on the gait. A friend of mine had 2 gaited horses, an American Curly and a Missouri Fox Trotter. Riding the Curly was sheer Heaven, especially at his running walk or rack, whatever it was called, can't remember right now. I could ride the Fox Trotter if I was VERY careful not to let her get into her pace. She could throw my back out at the pace so bad that I had to have help to get off. If I could hold her together and get her into her Fox Trot,.....OH YEAH! It was sweet!

I ride Arabians, Saddlebreds and a QH. I say the Arabians are well sprung Maseratis, Saddlebreds are Caddilacs and the QH is a Yugo with bad suspension and steering. Of the 3, the QH is the sweetest, least complicated horse and it hurts so bad when I get off that I can't breathe. I think the Saddlebred is the softest ride for my back. The QH is the most tolerant if I have to make an unconventional dismount because of back pain. The Arab is the most fun.

LOL! Got distracted! Ref your clacking problem, I had a horse who did that, had a big overstep. We trimmed his back toes squared off, shortened him up a bit and set his shoes back a little like another poster mentioned. And he had to be done evey 6 weeks like clockwork.
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    10-13-2012, 10:48 PM
  #27
Green Broke
Most walkers I've seen (not all) who forge are ex show horses and forge when when going slow. On even ground you can simply kick them up a bit and it should stop. Going up/down hill says to me she hasn't learned to shorten her stride in rough going. That takes time and miles, not all will learn it when starting trails a bit later in life. Squaring off her back toes might help a bit but then it might not.

I've never heard a walker that was trail trained at a young age ever forge on the trail. I have heard a few of them forge when dog walking out across the pasture. When trail trained at a young age they automatically learn to adjust their stride for the terrain they are on. Show horses are trained to maximize their overstep and sometimes have a hard time adjusting it later in life.
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    10-13-2012, 10:54 PM
  #28
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darrin    
Most walkers I've seen (not all) who forge are ex show horses and forge when when going slow. On even ground you can simply kick them up a bit and it should stop. Going up/down hill says to me she hasn't learned to shorten her stride in rough going. That takes time and miles, not all will learn it when starting trails a bit later in life. Squaring off her back toes might help a bit but then it might not.

I've never heard a walker that was trail trained at a young age ever forge on the trail. I have heard a few of them forge when dog walking out across the pasture. When trail trained at a young age they automatically learn to adjust their stride for the terrain they are on. Show horses are trained to maximize their overstep and sometimes have a hard time adjusting it later in life.

Interesting. Far as I know she was never used for anything but trails and was trained to work cattle by a prof. Trainer in OK. All heresay of course, cause im just parroting what I was told by those that I bought her from. Im her third owner.

So is this really a big deal in your opinion DARRIN?
     
    10-13-2012, 11:01 PM
  #29
Foal
She's a pretty girl.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dead Rabbit    
well my experience is limited to her. So my riding could be affecting her. But its not always the smoothest. I can't sit rock steady all the time like I see others doing. Im wondering if she's isnt a little pacey. But I don't know.

Im told by that she looks fine. So it could be me. And she's very sound. Yes she very willing to move out. Not the fastest. But she likes to go. Course going down a grade she really slows down, or a very rocky path. I just let her go her pace.



This is her. GINGER. 6 yr old reg. Walking mare. This was the first day I got her. Back in July I believe it was. This is at at my riding partners place. She's about 10 mins up the road from me.
Dead Rabbit likes this.
     
    10-13-2012, 11:23 PM
  #30
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dead Rabbit    
interesting. Far as I know she was never used for anything but trails and was trained to work cattle by a prof. Trainer in OK. All heresay of course, cause im just parroting what I was told by those that I bought her from. Im her third owner.

So is this really a big deal in your opinion DARRIN?
Hmm, cattle trained? That right there explains your problem. I've herded cows on TWH and it's not easy for them due to how slow you go to stay behind cows, definitely a forge inducing pace. But, that's still telling me you are riding her to slow on hills. This will likely take you out of your comfort zone, boot her up until the forging stops a couple of times to see if that fixes it. If it does, you'll have to decide for yourself if you can ride her at that pace. I'll guarantee she'll do it even if you are not liking that speed.

To answere your question. It's certainly possible for them to hurt themselves forging but no one I know with a forger has had one hurt themselves that way. It's more annoying to the rider than anything else. The solution 99% of the time is to boot them up but these are generally riders who like going slow so don't or wont.
Dead Rabbit likes this.
     

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