Do you care about how gaited your horse is? - Page 3
   

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Do you care about how gaited your horse is?

This is a discussion on Do you care about how gaited your horse is? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category

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        11-03-2013, 12:16 PM
      #21
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Guilherme    
    This fixation on gait also often prevents fair evaluations of conformation, temperment, training, etc.
    You know, this is how I feel about registered horses in general.

    If I was wealthy I am sure I would pick a breed and breed it well. I think registered horses bred by people who care are a great thing!

    But, so many times I see people with fugly horses and the only thing they seem to consider is their horse's papers. Like the horse is worth breeding because it has famous ancestors but the horse in front of me would never be considered worth breeding if it didn't have those papers attached.

    I think conformation, temperment and training are so much more important than registration papers. Papers are nice. But these other things should come first! Sorry I got a little side-tracked as you were talking specifically about gait, but boy, what you said sure has a ring of truth to horses in general!
    nicoles likes this.
         
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        11-03-2013, 12:47 PM
      #22
    Started
    Here's my take on getting a gaited horse: I was looking for a quiet, well trained, smooth horse for a green rider (my husband) that would only see the trail. To that end, I was not interested in a specific breed so went to look at the retired foxtrotter brood mare with an open mind. The owner (also breeder of that breed) was very generous in explaining what was considered correct and not so much for the breed, where to find further information if I was interested and where my mare did a couple of moves (nothing to do with unsoundness and she also knew we wanted a trail horse) on tryout that wasn't the ideal standard for the breed. So, I still stand by what I said earlier - I am not concerned with the perfect gait because I`m more than happy with what she can give; I will add that I`m sure how she travels now (with her occasional lapses from the ideal) is in no way uncomfortable for her or detrimental to her long term soundness.
    nicoles likes this.
         
        11-04-2013, 01:46 AM
      #23
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jimmyp    
    Again...... I understand all of this. I see literally hundreds of gaited horses a year at field trials the vast majority are TWH. It always amazes me how satisfied a lot of owners are with a horse that trots as long as it is somewhat comfortable. To be honest I find that there are a large number of gaited horse owners that don't know the difference. Hell I see people on this very forum discuss trotting their gaited horses all the time.

    Jim
    I just wanted to add that I do know the difference between gaits and am not interested in a trotting TWH. Now, I have read that it's a good idea to teach a TWH to trot out for the vet checks in endurance riding (just something I read, I never looked into it), but I'm not interested in encouraging trotting, period.

    I took this question to mean if I'm happy with my horse's natural gaiting or if I want to get his gaits refined. I don't literally mean that as long as he's any degree smoother than my Paint was, I'm happy. He better gait, it's what I chose him for, lol. Basically, as long as my gelding gaits smoothly and naturally, I'm happy. Again, he's a yearling, so it's something I'll start worrying (or not) about in a couple of years.

    *I hope what I was trying to get across makes sense, English is my second language.* :)
         
        11-04-2013, 01:52 AM
      #24
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Chevaux    
    Here's my take on getting a gaited horse: I was looking for a quiet, well trained, smooth horse for a green rider (my husband) that would only see the trail. To that end, I was not interested in a specific breed so went to look at the retired foxtrotter brood mare with an open mind. The owner (also breeder of that breed) was very generous in explaining what was considered correct and not so much for the breed, where to find further information if I was interested and where my mare did a couple of moves (nothing to do with unsoundness and she also knew we wanted a trail horse) on tryout that wasn't the ideal standard for the breed. So, I still stand by what I said earlier - I am not concerned with the perfect gait because I`m more than happy with what she can give; I will add that I`m sure how she travels now (with her occasional lapses from the ideal) is in no way uncomfortable for her or detrimental to her long term soundness.
    ^This. I don't care if he's not perfect at gaiting. I was interested in a sound mind, a very, very good temperament (I have preteen daughters), with smooth gaits being the cherry on top.
    Cacowgirl and Chevaux like this.
         
        11-04-2013, 01:55 AM
      #25
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
    The word "trotty" is not acceptable to me, under any circumstances when it comes to my Walking Horses. I can't speak to the other gaited breeds as TWH's are all I have ever owned.

    If any of mine get trotty, I know something is wrong and I get the chiropractor out.

    That is the one thing my 53 years of trail riding self would not tolerate. The bulk of that 53 years was spent sliding down hills, riverbanks and making my own trails "over the river and thru the woods".

    If someone had a TWH for sale and proudly displayed their trotting ability to me, I would be in my car and headed home while they were still talking.

    If the Seller said, "he's trotty and I don't know why", I would keep looking, ride the horse, and think maybe a chiropractor could help him.
    I had no idea about any of this. I'll keep this in mind if I ever see my walker trotting. I'm German and TWH's are a new, exotic breed to me. I love learning new things about them!
         
        11-04-2013, 04:30 AM
      #26
    Green Broke
    I just brought home a nice little gaited mare. No papers, so I watched the gal ride her then I rode her a bit, then bought her. I'm not sure what gait she has, but she's smooth, she's very good at obstacles, & she comes right up to me & wants attention. She's everything I want in a horse & her dappled buckskin coloring is just more icing on a lovely cake! I am so happy to have this lovely mare to enjoy in my "golden years"! Previously I've had TWH, Peruvian Pasos, & Paso Finos, & ridden MFT & single-footers. Learning more about my new girl, will be a fun adventure.
         
        11-04-2013, 11:46 AM
      #27
    Weanling
    I show, so during the show season I care about the animation and every ride close to a show is a training session. But truthfully, once my show season is over I loosen the reins and just enjoy trail rides with my girl. She is all heart and tries very hard for me so I reward her with less demanding rides where we do more fun things like jump the canola (we have discovered my walking horse jumps athletically lol), canter through the fields and amble along. I do expect her to stay in gait, but she rarely goes out of it anyways and I don't expect her to work like we're going to the show. I will occassionally ask her to collect and set up and show some animation sometimes, I don't ride that way for a whole ride.
         
        11-05-2013, 12:21 AM
      #28
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jimmyp    
    Or I see people buy a gaited horse and then just ride it and have no clue what they are doing but they are happy cause its smoother than whatever they had though it could be smoother with a little effort, but they are happy so they just ride. I guess without being an ******* Im wondering why buy a gaited horse if your not going to take advantage of it? I just am curio use how many people buy gaited horses for the gait and are satisfied to just let the horse do what it wants. Not a training question, not looking for advice just want to hear from some haired horse owners.......

    Jim
    The first time I was shopping for a gaited horse I thought the sellers were lying to me when they said their horse was smooth. I finally figured out many gaited horse owners are beginners (and yes, you can ride for many years and still be a beginner) so any gait, including the pace, to them is still smoother than a trot. They weren't concerned with what their horse was doing and not interested in learning. I guess as long as they're happy it doesn't matter. But I agree with you, if I'm buying a gaited horse for a smooth ride, then that's what I want.
         
        11-05-2013, 07:41 AM
      #29
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Malda    
    The first time I was shopping for a gaited horse I thought the sellers were lying to me when they said their horse was smooth. I finally figured out many gaited horse owners are beginners (and yes, you can ride for many years and still be a beginner) so any gait, including the pace, to them is still smoother than a trot. They weren't concerned with what their horse was doing and not interested in learning. I guess as long as they're happy it doesn't matter. But I agree with you, if I'm buying a gaited horse for a smooth ride, then that's what I want.
    You got it half right.

    It doesn't matter to the owner.

    It does matter to the horse.

    Basic knowledge of proper equitation, tack fit and adjustment, and husbandry does not require a PhD. It does require a desire to balance the need for the human for comfort against the cost to the horse of providing that comfort. I ain't rocket science.

    G.
         
        11-07-2013, 07:16 PM
      #30
    Foal
    "So for you gaited riders (shows aside) how concerned are you with the action and mechanics of your gaited horse, vs. a clean smooth ride?"

    I've ridden trotting horses for over 25 years and 7 years ago I decided to buy a gaited horse. I was tired of bouncing around with a sore back. I was open to any gaited breed as long as the horse was smooth. So I bought a 3-year-old TWH who is so smooth it is often hard to discern what gait she is doing: Rack, flat walk, running walk, fox trot or some other rendition of smooth. And her canter is smooth. She's smooth with a loose rein and smooth on contact. Smooth I bought and smooth I got.

    Initially for me, I didn't care about "correctness" of gait until the TWH Club I joined asked me to give showing a try. Then "correctness" mattered. So I began to better discern and make consistent my horse's gaits.

    In terms of what actually is "correct" that's another story.

    (All I know is that my TWH is smooth!)
         

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