Do you care about how gaited your horse is? - Page 4
 
 

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Do you care about how gaited your horse is?

This is a discussion on Do you care about how gaited your horse is? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Most efficient gait for a horse
  • Three gaited vs five gaited horses

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    01-01-2014, 06:28 PM
  #31
Weanling
I trail ride with my TWH and admit I do not know much about her gaits. I know what is comfortable and that she is the best trail horse I have ever owned. Her walk is amazing and I know that when I get her up to a faster pace that I compare to trotting on a QH it is very comfortable. No bouncing. So something must be right
     
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    01-01-2014, 11:26 PM
  #32
Weanling
When I bought my Walker, he would do the whole spectrum of gaits- trot, pace, foxtrot, stepping pace, runningwalk, rack, all within a few minutes, it seemed. D;

Training him to consistently do a runningwalk was the most time and energy I'd ever spent really honing a gait, and after a few months I forgot all about it because it was second nature for him.

Now we show occasionally and do long distance trail rides, maybe we'll get into some endurance riding... who knows, but as long as he is fit and relaxed and going along happily, he can do whatever he wants :)
     
    01-02-2014, 12:33 AM
  #33
Green Broke
I give zero cares about my horse's gait. She is trained to hard trot most of the time. When I ask for a gait, it's a stepping pace. It isn't silky smooth, but it's WAY smoother than a trot, so I'm satisfied. She has a racking gait as well, but it isn't very efficient for long distance riding (tires her easily and drives her heart rate way up), so we stick to switching between the trot and the step pace.
     
    01-02-2014, 01:44 AM
  #34
Weanling
I target both mechanics and clean smooth ride. Now I don't force or go anal on a particular gait be it a pace (I can make it comfortable if the animal is hard wired for it) run walk or a rack. I must admit though when it comes to a stepping pace I realy like to try to get the horse racking, I just don't like the way it looks or feels. So I will shoot for a clean rack esp if the animal will be shown. If not then well I deal with it.

I think mechanics are important on the way an animal travels and how one is conditioned and trained. (artificial means...no) I also like to show some (low level) but its not my goal. Stamina also plays on mechanics the more square (rack or run walk and even foxtrot.) they are, the more stamina and smooth the ride. Of course in the pace its all about being lateral. I had a TWH mare that was hard wire pacer. I was able to train her to perform a jogging pace (like a WP jog but lateral) and it was comfortable. Animation or flash is not important to me...if the horse has natural animation then I call that a bonus.

I guess its personal preference though.
     
    01-05-2014, 05:33 PM
  #35
Weanling
I have enjoyed reading that I am not the only that is not hung up on the gait
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    01-07-2014, 01:51 PM
  #36
Super Moderator
Count me in the camp of an owner who does care about correctness. However, not showiness. I've ridden non gaited horses my whole life and have owned or ridden gaited ones too. While I don't show gaited horse, I do understand the mechanics and the correctness and how it relates to smoothness.

For example, my current horse is a RMH. When I decided to buy another horse I was looking at RMH, KMH, SSH, MFT, TWH, and Pasos because I already knew what they can do and what I had in mind. After deciding temperament was first and foremost my goal as I have a youngster now, I made sure to refresh my knowledge on the various gaits each one does so that when I was looking at horses I could spot which ones that were gaiting correctly vs those that were not, and here's why-

Back to my current horse-
When my horse is gaiting correctly (singlefooting) the ride is the smoothest he is capable of doing and it's a pure pleasure to ride. However, if he has ill fitting tack, is out of shape, whatever....he's going to do a stepping pace. Still more comfortable that a trot, yes and probably very impressive to some, but it is not as comfortable as singlefooting.
It's simple really...in general the more correctly (not showy) a gaited horse moves along, the smoother the ride will be.

Any horse, regardless of breed or gait, can accomplish a great number of things, but those things should be secondary to conformational soundness and moving correctly (gaited or not) for their longevity and health.
     
    01-07-2014, 04:40 PM
  #37
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lockwood    
Count me in the camp of an owner who does care about correctness. However, not showiness. I've ridden non gaited horses my whole life and have owned or ridden gaited ones too. While I don't show gaited horse, I do understand the mechanics and the correctness and how it relates to smoothness.

For example, my current horse is a RMH. When I decided to buy another horse I was looking at RMH, KMH, SSH, MFT, TWH, and Pasos because I already knew what they can do and what I had in mind. After deciding temperament was first and foremost my goal as I have a youngster now, I made sure to refresh my knowledge on the various gaits each one does so that when I was looking at horses I could spot which ones that were gaiting correctly vs those that were not, and here's why-

Back to my current horse-
When my horse is gaiting correctly (singlefooting) the ride is the smoothest he is capable of doing and it's a pure pleasure to ride. However, if he has ill fitting tack, is out of shape, whatever....he's going to do a stepping pace. Still more comfortable that a trot, yes and probably very impressive to some, but it is not as comfortable as singlefooting.
It's simple really...in general the more correctly (not showy) a gaited horse moves along, the smoother the ride will be.

Any horse, regardless of breed or gait, can accomplish a great number of things, but those things should be secondary to conformational soundness and moving correctly (gaited or not) for their longevity and health.
this is the best statement on the whole thread.

Anyone who doesnt care about how their horse is gaited, I believe hasnt ridden many gaited horses. Or very good ones.

And why someone wants to trot a gaited horse is beyond me. And why someone wants to pace rather than make them rack, is also inconceivable.

But that's just me and how I want to ride.
     
    01-09-2014, 04:17 AM
  #38
Weanling
Lockwood: I just love your avatar. (sorry off topic but I just had to comment on it.)
Lockwood likes this.
     
    01-09-2014, 08:07 AM
  #39
Super Moderator
Thank you.
     
    01-09-2014, 09:05 AM
  #40
Weanling
I bought my first gaited horse because we moved to an area where almost everyone rides gaited and my QH and I were struggling to keep up. I bought a RMH that is VERY pacey. I've learned a little about gaited horses since then (whole new world) and realize that she's pacing because she is bracing and hollow. I don't let her pace, I immediately bring her back to a walk & we are a work in progress. Am I happy? Yes...she is a walking machine and can easily keep up with my trail riding friends. Am I concerned about gaits? Yes, but I lack the knowledge and the dedication to retrain her. Would I buy her today? Probably not, but I won't ever sell her.
     

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