Does anyone else NOT enjoy gaited horses? - Page 12
 
 

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Does anyone else NOT enjoy gaited horses?

This is a discussion on Does anyone else NOT enjoy gaited horses? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Do fox trotters sometimes do a running walk or pace
  • Lateral paciness

 
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    05-07-2011, 03:15 PM
  #111
Green Broke
Wow, so I am really ignorant when it comes to Walkers. I thought the running walk was THE gait the Tennesee Walker was most known for. So in reality, that's mostly been bred out of them.

I admit I know very little about gaited horses. The most I know comes from a friend who is mostly into trail riding Fox Trotters (but owned walkers before too).

She has a Fox Trotter that does a running walk when he is excited. I like that gait better than his Fox Trot because it's smoother. It feels like his back end is down and gliding and his front end is more elevated. If that is, in fact the running walk (and my Fox Trotter mare does it on rare occasions when she is excited too) then does that mean you are more likely to get a running walk out of a Fox Trotter than a TWH?

To me, as a gaited horse novice, a Fox Trot feels like the front end is more downhill, and the horse is walking in the front, and trotting (or jiggling) behind.

The running walk feels the opposite. The back end is down, walking/gliding, and the front end is more animated/high stepping.

Is that correct, on a basic novice level?

I *thought* that the running walk was just a sped-up version of the flat walk. And the flat walk is just a sped-up version of a normal walk. So you are saying that TWH's can't run-walk OR flat-walk most of the time? But they can dog-walk, surely? So you can't just speed up the walk, they will start pacing?

That is a strange concept to me. Even the Fox Trotters can flat-walk. It's hard for me to picture a TWH that can't flat-walk. It is basically just a very fast WALK, correct?

Trying to understand the scale that Guilherme explained, I guess my Fox Trotter (and Fox Trotters in general) are more in the center of the scale than TWH's. My mare actually does a hard trot (at least it feels like it to me), a Fox Trot, dog walk, flat-walk, run-walk, pace and canter. (She likes to combine the pace and canter sometimes, talk about funky!)

She is more to the diagonal than the lateral on the scale, as she prefers her more trotty gaits, but she does do some lateral gaits when the mood strikes her right. So in a weird sort of way, that is a good thing, because it means she is more centered in the scale of gaits, right?

(Or more than likely, it just means I don't know what I am doing! )
     
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    05-07-2011, 03:40 PM
  #112
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
I *thought* that the running walk was just a sped-up version of the flat walk. And the flat walk is just a sped-up version of a normal walk. So you are saying that TWH's can't run-walk OR flat-walk most of the time? But they can dog-walk, surely? So you can't just speed up the walk, they will start pacing?
That's exactly how you fix the paciness - by speeding up the walk. Most pacey Walkers will do a flat walk and then switch to a pace or stepping pace when sped up. The trick to fixing it is finding their breaking point and riding them there until they build up the muscle and the coordination to go faster.
     
    05-07-2011, 03:51 PM
  #113
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
Trying to understand the scale that Guilherme explained, I guess my Fox Trotter (and Fox Trotters in general) are more in the center of the scale than TWH's. My mare actually does a hard trot (at least it feels like it to me), a Fox Trot, dog walk, flat-walk, run-walk, pace and canter. (She likes to combine the pace and canter sometimes, talk about funky!)

She is more to the diagonal than the lateral on the scale, as she prefers her more trotty gaits, but she does do some lateral gaits when the mood strikes her right. So in a weird sort of way, that is a good thing, because it means she is more centered in the scale of gaits, right?

(Or more than likely, it just means I don't know what I am doing! )
Sorry to double-post, but actually, Fox Trotters (in general, not necessarily yours) are FAR on the diagonal side of the spectrum - at a D4. The foxtrot is only very slightly different than a trot.
     
    05-07-2011, 09:45 PM
  #114
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
Wow, so I am really ignorant when it comes to Walkers. I thought the running walk was THE gait the Tennesee Walker was most known for. So in reality, that's mostly been bred out of them.

I admit I know very little about gaited horses. The most I know comes from a friend who is mostly into trail riding Fox Trotters (but owned walkers before too).

She has a Fox Trotter that does a running walk when he is excited. I like that gait better than his Fox Trot because it's smoother. It feels like his back end is down and gliding and his front end is more elevated. If that is, in fact the running walk (and my Fox Trotter mare does it on rare occasions when she is excited too) then does that mean you are more likely to get a running walk out of a Fox Trotter than a TWH?

To me, as a gaited horse novice, a Fox Trot feels like the front end is more downhill, and the horse is walking in the front, and trotting (or jiggling) behind.

The running walk feels the opposite. The back end is down, walking/gliding, and the front end is more animated/high stepping.

Is that correct, on a basic novice level?

I *thought* that the running walk was just a sped-up version of the flat walk. And the flat walk is just a sped-up version of a normal walk. So you are saying that TWH's can't run-walk OR flat-walk most of the time? But they can dog-walk, surely? So you can't just speed up the walk, they will start pacing?

That is a strange concept to me. Even the Fox Trotters can flat-walk. It's hard for me to picture a TWH that can't flat-walk. It is basically just a very fast WALK, correct?

Trying to understand the scale that Guilherme explained, I guess my Fox Trotter (and Fox Trotters in general) are more in the center of the scale than TWH's. My mare actually does a hard trot (at least it feels like it to me), a Fox Trot, dog walk, flat-walk, run-walk, pace and canter. (She likes to combine the pace and canter sometimes, talk about funky!)

She is more to the diagonal than the lateral on the scale, as she prefers her more trotty gaits, but she does do some lateral gaits when the mood strikes her right. So in a weird sort of way, that is a good thing, because it means she is more centered in the scale of gaits, right?

(Or more than likely, it just means I don't know what I am doing! )
If two naturally gaited horses are bred, then the result should be a true running walk. But what some people are doing is breeding for pacy horses so that when they pad the horses, they will be able to square it up and get a running walk....there are still plenty of people who breed for good, natural horses, but unfortunately, padded horses are more emphasized. And, I believe your definition of a fox trot is correct. Though I'm not positive.
     
    05-08-2011, 09:57 AM
  #115
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Azale1    
I have ridden several different gaited breeds, and haven't really liked one yet. I personally like to be able to feel the horse under me and be able to gauge what I am doing and what the horse is doing. I also don't see how can tell these horses if are lame since they don't move like normal horses to begin with.
Saying they don't move like "normal" horses - wow, how biased can you be? It's "normal" for a gaited horse to have a gait that non-gaited horses don't have. If you don't like that gait then don't get on any more gaited horses.
     
    05-11-2011, 03:34 PM
  #116
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkerLady    
Saying they don't move like "normal" horses - wow, how biased can you be? It's "normal" for a gaited horse to have a gait that non-gaited horses don't have. If you don't like that gait then don't get on any more gaited horses.
I think she was referring to ungaited horses, as "normal" since non gaited horses are a bit more common.
     
    05-11-2011, 05:32 PM
  #117
Yearling
They have their place in the world and can be wicked smooth at all gaits. I don't know much about them, so I can't say too much more. I enjoy riding one every once in a while, I get a kick out of how smooth they are and how they move, but personally I wouldn't want to own one. Its the same reason I wouldn't want to own a Fjord, a Friesian or many other breeds. I have my preferences. I don't believe a gaited horse could offer me what I want. I have seen many that struggle at barrel racing and jumping, which are two things I focus on. Can they barrel race and jump? Of course they can, just not as smooth as non-gaited horses.

If I only trail rode, or did flat work I would consider gaited. But I don't, so they are not for me.
     
    05-12-2011, 09:10 PM
  #118
Weanling
Well then you don't want to see our friends mare who does some awesome times in barrels. Nothing pro, just local fun shows. She eats up the ground and most people think she is a QH (the well built rear), but she's a Kentucky Mountain. Always funny when she tells someone that.
     
    05-13-2011, 02:31 PM
  #119
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horsesdontlie    
They have their place in the world and can be wicked smooth at all gaits. I don't know much about them, so I can't say too much more. I enjoy riding one every once in a while, I get a kick out of how smooth they are and how they move, but personally I wouldn't want to own one. Its the same reason I wouldn't want to own a Fjord, a Friesian or many other breeds. I have my preferences. I don't believe a gaited horse could offer me what I want. I have seen many that struggle at barrel racing and jumping, which are two things I focus on. Can they barrel race and jump? Of course they can, just not as smooth as non-gaited horses.

If I only trail rode, or did flat work I would consider gaited. But I don't, so they are not for me.
There's an old saw that goes, "Horses for Courses."

If you want to run barrels professionally you'll need a QH.

If you want to jump at the higher levels of Show Jumping or Puissance then you'll likely need a warmblood, or maybe Selle Francais or other European TB-type.

If you want to compete successfully in Endurance at the higher levels you'll be on an Arab or Arab-cross.

If you want to do any of the above at the "fun" level you can use any horse with four legs.

Gaited horses were developed as "road" horses. There were designed to get a rider from here to there over roads in Medieval Europe*. Roads in those days were often little more than dirt tracks, rife with bandits. So a good road horse had to be able to jump small obsticles, ditches, etc. It had to be able to outrun a local miscreant. And it had to be comfortable enough for a rider to be up 12 hours a day without being beaten to death. They were for transportation, not sport.

This does not mean that they can't compete in many equestrian sports at an amateur level, only that they are not suitable as professional mounts.

It's foolish to think a Walker or Mountain Horse or Marchador is going to jump 84 inches or win at Calgary in barrels. Not going to happen.

G.

*The same can be said for gaited horses in Asia.
     

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