Does your TWH trot?? - Page 2
 
 

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Does your TWH trot??

This is a discussion on Does your TWH trot?? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • How to retrain a trotty horse that is gaited
  • Trotty horse

 
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    10-05-2010, 10:34 PM
  #11
Green Broke
Ha ha, any horse is beautiful if you love it enough! :)
     
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    10-05-2010, 10:37 PM
  #12
Foal
That is true, I've only had her since Saturday, but the love is strong......
     
    10-05-2010, 10:59 PM
  #13
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brighteyes    
As far as rounding her up and getting her into a good frame, I would talk to a dressage queen. They lurk the forums and are very good at that kind of stuff and explain things much better than I can even try to. Anabel, Kayty, and other knowledgeable HF-er have helped me before, and will probably be happy to do the same for you.


And she has a nice pedigree; Midnight Sun bred horses are my favorites. My best little mare is heavy on the Midnight Sun, and she's as tough as they come. Great builds and very hardy horses! And yes. I DO like their heads.
The last thing you want to do is talk to a DQ about a trotty horse. They bascule their horses to get their Dressage trot. Do that the paciest Walker in all of Christendom and you'll get a trotting fool. A rounded back produces a trot in any horse ever born.

"Collection" in a laterally or center gaited horse means a neutral back, but an engaged rear. This can be done, but requires intelligent use of the leg way more than the hand. You need to push the horse into the bridle with the leg and meter the energy with the hand. You don't want to push too hard as that wastes the horse's energy. If you don't push enough they will "string out" and you will lose most of the power of the horse.

I suspect of lot of "trotting" can be caused by excessive use of the leg and hand (causing a functional, if not immediately noticeable, bascule). Lighten up on both, but keep the horse moving forward.

G.
     
    10-05-2010, 11:24 PM
  #14
Green Broke
This is something I have had trouble with riding my Fox Trotter too. I am used to "collecting" and tucking the head of most horses I ride, at least at any gait faster than a walk (at a walk I always prefer a loose rein).

So now I have a Fox Trotter ex-broodmare, who does gait really nice when she wants too, but she also trots roughly if you let her! My natural inclination is to try to tuck the head and I know NOT to do that with her, but gosh, I am not very good at bringing out her best gaits either!

I have a hard time accepting that the head is suposed to be up and the nose is supposed to be out, lol! And a hard time knowing when I am doing it correctly. I feel like I am hollowing out her back if I let her head to come up.

How do I know if her back is too hollow or just right? I guess if I get a gait I like? She does gait better with a higher head. I just don't know when a high head is correct and when I am hollowing them out. I actually wouldn't care if her back was hollow other than people act like that is really bad for them.
     
    10-05-2010, 11:34 PM
  #15
Green Broke
PS. My gaited horse neighbor is always telling me I "throw my reins away," meaning I don't ride with enough contact but tend to ride a really loose rein.

I started thinking about what you said above, and what I said below it, and I'm really wondering if lack of contact isn't my problem. Or at least lack of impulsion from my legs. She gets trotty when I let her go too fast and I'm sure I am giving her too much rein. Then when I start wondering about how to get her out of the trot is when I start wondering if I should "collect" the head down or up.

Maybe I just need more contact and "push" with my legs to begin with, instead of letting it all fall apart and then wonder how I got there. Hmm. I know it happens when I let her get going too fast, she looses the Fox Trot and goes into what I assume is a real trot, because it feels just like a normal trot to me. Really bouncy, and not a pace, because I've felt that too, lol!
     
    10-06-2010, 12:11 PM
  #16
Yearling
Head set in any horse comes from the rear, not the front. This is counterintuitive but absolutely true.

So push with the leg and use the hand to control what you get.

Many gaited horses do best when ridden in contact. The "contact" here was described by Lee Ziegler as the weight of an orange, not that of a watermelon. IOW you don't want to work your forearms like Popey the Sailor, rather you want to always be able to feel the mouth. A snaffle is the best bit to learn this for both horse and rider. After each has become well trained, then the curb may be used to refine communication.

Putting a horse, any horse, into an artificial "frame" will have consequences and they won't always be good ones. Neither will they always be bad ones. Just how much you can do with any given horse will be determined by that horse's conformation and way of going.

G.
     
    10-06-2010, 08:10 PM
  #17
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guilherme    
The last thing you want to do is talk to a DQ about a trotty horse. They bascule their horses to get their Dressage trot. Do that the paciest Walker in all of Christendom and you'll get a trotting fool. A rounded back produces a trot in any horse ever born.

"Collection" in a laterally or center gaited horse means a neutral back, but an engaged rear. This can be done, but requires intelligent use of the leg way more than the hand. You need to push the horse into the bridle with the leg and meter the energy with the hand. You don't want to push too hard as that wastes the horse's energy. If you don't push enough they will "string out" and you will lose most of the power of the horse.

I suspect of lot of "trotting" can be caused by excessive use of the leg and hand (causing a functional, if not immediately noticeable, bascule). Lighten up on both, but keep the horse moving forward.

G.

Looks like I've learned something too! Thanks!
     
    10-27-2010, 07:11 PM
  #18
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guilherme    
The last thing you want to do is talk to a DQ about a trotty horse. They bascule their horses to get their Dressage trot. Do that the paciest Walker in all of Christendom and you'll get a trotting fool. A rounded back produces a trot in any horse ever born.

"Collection" in a laterally or center gaited horse means a neutral back, but an engaged rear. This can be done, but requires intelligent use of the leg way more than the hand. You need to push the horse into the bridle with the leg and meter the energy with the hand. You don't want to push too hard as that wastes the horse's energy. If you don't push enough they will "string out" and you will lose most of the power of the horse.

I suspect of lot of "trotting" can be caused by excessive use of the leg and hand (causing a functional, if not immediately noticeable, bascule). Lighten up on both, but keep the horse moving forward.

G.
well said! I had a beautiful walker who'd do a fabulous running walk all day if you asked him to. Sold him, the next owners had a dressage trainer working with him....why I do not know as he was so well trained a true load and go trail horse. Anyways, they ended up having to send him to West Virginia (not positive) to some gaited horse trainer after the dressage trainer was through with him;o(
     
    10-27-2010, 08:46 PM
  #19
Foal
That sucks!

I don't understand why dressage trainers want to get their hands on a walking horse. There are enough breeds that trot, leave the gaited ones go.

The reason I say this is, supposedly the new thing is TW Horse Dressage Classes. WHY??

I have a friend, big into Dressage, she wants me to bring my gelding to her SOO bad. I won't do it.

NOTHING Against dressage, not at all. I think it's an awesome way of riding, but not for the gaited horse.
     
    10-27-2010, 11:08 PM
  #20
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
This is something I have had trouble with riding my Fox Trotter too. I am used to "collecting" and tucking the head of most horses I ride, at least at any gait faster than a walk (at a walk I always prefer a loose rein).

So now I have a Fox Trotter ex-broodmare, who does gait really nice when she wants too, but she also trots roughly if you let her! My natural inclination is to try to tuck the head and I know NOT to do that with her, but gosh, I am not very good at bringing out her best gaits either!

I have a hard time accepting that the head is suposed to be up and the nose is supposed to be out, lol! And a hard time knowing when I am doing it correctly. I feel like I am hollowing out her back if I let her head to come up.

How do I know if her back is too hollow or just right? I guess if I get a gait I like? She does gait better with a higher head. I just don't know when a high head is correct and when I am hollowing them out. I actually wouldn't care if her back was hollow other than people act like that is really bad for them.
Actually, it's very easy to collect a MFT compared to other gaited breeds because their gait is so similar to a normal trot.


This is how I like my MFT's frame: http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2556/...2ff06061_z.jpg

When I'm working her in the arena, I usually bring her nose in a little more and make her work a little more on her hind end, but that's how she goes on the trail ^

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1356/...7d4976de_z.jpg
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2788/...dd1297dc_z.jpg



But then, it also depends on what type of conformation your MFT has. Some look a lot more TWH and some look a lot more QH. The TWH-types will be able to collect more easily with their head raised and their nose in. The QH-types won't be able to.
     

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