Doing a project on Gaited Horses! :)
 
 

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Doing a project on Gaited Horses! :)

This is a discussion on Doing a project on Gaited Horses! :) within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Whats the diference between a Missouri foxtrotter and a tennessee walker
  • Round skirt or square skirt saddle for rocky mountain horses

 
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    02-02-2010, 09:28 PM
  #1
Foal
Doing a project on Gaited Horses! :)

I'm doing a feature article on gaited horses for my english journalism class, and I have virtually no knowledge about it, but I'm very very interested :) That's why I'm doing it, it needs to be something we are interesed in.
Could I please have a summary of what a gaited horse is and what they do, the different gaited breeds there are and what gaits they have from all of you knowledgable people out there? Also, if there is any special tack that you use?
Thankyou all very much.
     
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    02-02-2010, 09:57 PM
  #2
Weanling
First of all they don't trot. No bumpy ride, no posting to the trot. Many people call them the "glide ride". When they walk or canter they move pretty much like a regular breeds.

I am going to keep it pretty general.

Tennessee Walkers flatwalk and runwalk.

Missouri Foxtrotters do just that Foxtrot.

Mountain horses (Rocky and Kentucky) do a gait similar to the flatwalk and runwalk, but when they walk they have less overstride.

Icelandics have several gaits, for them I need help from an Icelandic owner.

There are Appaloosa horses that are called "Indian Shufflers" which is a very smooth fast walk.

Some Saddlebreds are gaited, so are some Morgans.

Most all are shortbacked and you usually have to have a round skirt saddle to keep the flank area clear. You don't need any special equipment, if they are gaited they gait naturally. With work I believe most all have the ability to do any of the gaits of each breed.

Some are 3 gaited, some are five gaited. It all depends on how you want your horse to move.

And as many on here know, Trigger, one of the most known horses ever from the old days owned by Roy Rogers were Tennessee Walkers whose bloodlines are still in some modern horses.
     
    02-03-2010, 01:46 AM
  #3
Foal
lone rangers "silver" was also a tennessee walking horse

I think the previouse post answered your question well, but I wanted to add that the famouse white stallion "Silver" was also a TWH( from Lone Ranger), there was also a third old western horse that was famouse who was a walker but I don't remember the name. TWHBEA was actually looking for look alikes of these three famouse horses for showing at the 2010 Alltech in Lexington KY.
Also I would like to add that many TWH and KMH owners prefer an english type of saddle called a cut back. I have ridden a cut back, square skirt western , english jump , english endurance and australian saddle on my mare at one time or another and I feel that the cut back suits her better. She is the old type, very long and lanky. Most modern type walkers are more compact and not so tall.
Of course it also depends on what you are doing with your gaited horse and trust me, they can do anything a in any discepline. Matter of fact Craig Camerons Extreme Cowboy race ( non professional finals) was won by a tennessee walking horse. Horse and rider had to complete a course that included roping, jumping, firing a pistol, running with a sliding stop, e.t.c. And then they had to complete some obstacles while riding bare back. I was so proud of her and her horse!
     
    02-03-2010, 02:00 AM
  #4
Foal
Thankyou very much :)
     
    02-03-2010, 04:40 PM
  #5
Started
Icy owner: Icelandic horses do 5 gaits, the walk (same as any other breed) the trot (is a mandatory part in some classes at gaited horse shows here, is definitely not frowned upon), the tölt (a 4-beat smooth gait, you can hold a glass of wine without spilling it even at fast speeds), the canter/gallop (we call it stökk and we don't count canter and gallop as seperate gaits) and finally the flying pace (a fast 2 beat gait, only ridden fast, is generally frowned upon if it's slow).

Some videos:
Tölt:Flying pace: on ice, so the horse is a little unbalaced
Icelandic riders often use Icelandic saddles which are similar to dressage saddles. I believe they are placed further back to make room for the shoulder movement but since I haven't ridden any other breed I can't be sure. Bridles are most often just a simple bridle with a foreheadstrap and without a throatlatch and dropped nosebands are the most common.

And I think that's about it. If anythings unclear or you want more information please just ask :)
     
    02-03-2010, 08:01 PM
  #6
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainLiecy    
I'm doing a feature article on gaited horses for my english journalism class, and I have virtually no knowledge about it, but I'm very very interested :) That's why I'm doing it, it needs to be something we are interesed in.
Could I please have a summary of what a gaited horse is and what they do, the different gaited breeds there are and what gaits they have from all of you knowledgable people out there? Also, if there is any special tack that you use?
Thankyou all very much.

Oh boy, are you going to be confused. The problem with gaited horses is that every breed association claims their breed's gait is different from all the others. Strictly speaking a gait is defined by the sequence and timing that each hoof hits the ground. But by that definition, there are really only four smooth gaits: The rack, the running walk, the step pace and the foxtrot.

The Foxtrot is a separate gait because it's diagonal - the sequence of footfalls is different from the others. The step pace is a separate gait because of the timing - the four beats are not quite even. Step pacing is undesirable though so I wouldn't include it in your report (although the fast gait of the Peruvian Paso is a step pace - I forget the Spanish name for it).

The running walk and the rack have the same sequence of footfalls, but I call them separate gaits because there are other important differences between them. In the running walk, the horse's hind feet reach past the tracks of the forefeet (overstride) and the horse also nods its head. In the rack it does neither of those things.

So, the Missouri foxtrotter does the foxtrot, and the Tennessee walking horse does the running walk. No matter what the breeders call it, all other gaited horses rack. The tolt of the Icelandic is a rack, and the "slow gait" of the saddlebred is just a slow rack. All the "gaits" of the Paso Fino are racks performed at different speeds and degrees of collection. The only other variation on the rack is how Peruvian Paso's arc their frontlegs out sideways during the paso illano, but I don't think that's enough to call it a different gait. The flying pace of the Icelandic doesn't count because even though it's smooth (when fast), it does have moments of suspension like the gaits of regular horses.

The most common gaited horses in the you.S are the TWH, Peruvian Paso, Paso Fino, the Rocky Mountain horse and Kentucky Mountain Saddle Horse (not much difference between those two) and the Icelandic. Then there are breeds that are sometimes gaited like Saddlebreds, Morgans and Standardbreds.
     
    02-04-2010, 09:43 PM
  #7
Started
I definitely recommend the book "Easy-Gaited Horses." It's super detailed and easy to understand and it includes pictures and drawings and charts of all the different gaits.

It's only $13 on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Easy-Gaited-Horses-methods-training-pleasure/dp/1580175627/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265334203&sr=8-1
     
    02-04-2010, 10:21 PM
  #8
Green Broke
^ I absolutely love that book. I too highly recommend it. The author herself (although no longer with us) is a very good author. I'd recommend anything by her.

It's packed full of goodies. A steal at only $13!
     

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