Fox Trotter- nose out, or "collect?" - Page 2
 
 

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Fox Trotter- nose out, or "collect?"

This is a discussion on Fox Trotter- nose out, or "collect?" within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Deb bennet gaited horse
  • Foks two nose

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    12-02-2011, 11:37 AM
  #11
Yearling
Thank you for your kind words!

You don't want to bascule excessively, but neither do you want to hollow the back (particularly with a diagonally gaited horse). With a diagonally gaited horse a touch of bascule would not necessarily be bad. But you want to avoid that Mythbusters tradition that goes "anything worth doing is worth overdoing"!!!

If the horse horse is going well and you have good communication with the snaffle then stick with it. But if you need more "communication" on the trail or in open country or in a more stressful environment (parade, demonstration, etc.) then use the bit that gives you that "little something extra." I was once a "snaffle bit Nazi" but my experiences in military horsemanship convinced me that I was wrong in that assumption. My personal goal is to train myself to use a full double bridle with bit and bradoon and then start using that with our Marchadors. I'm about half way, using four reins on Pelham bit. In many ways that an excellent approach as it gives the rider the option of using snaffle or curb action as required by circumstances.

I'd add a couple of books to your list. First are the three, small volumes from Dr. Deb Bennet on Principles of Conformation. Last time I checked they were about $13/ea. At Amazon. She walks through the principles of equine conformation in a very readable and understandable manner. It's not always spot on for the gaited horse. Still, at the end of the day there are but a very few conformation deviations that benefit the soft intermediate gait. The adjective "gaited" modifies the noun "horse." We should always keep that in mind.

Second, I'd add Horsemanship and Horsemastership, Vol. I (Education of the Horse and Education of the Rider). This was the basic text at the Cavalry School at Ft. Riley, KS from the mid-30s to the end of the Horse Cavalry. It is an outstanding guide because it addresses training horse and rider in a very consistent manner. For example, if you want to learn a correct turn on the haunches you can read in Part 1 what the rider must be doing and in Part 2 what the horse must be doing in consitent language. That, frankly, is a failure in many modern texts on training and instruction. For maximum benefit get the three DVDs of training films used to instruct recruits. The whole package is under $100. Find them at U.S. Cavalry Association Store .

Now you've got some stuff you can ask others to put in your Christmas stocking!!!

Good luck with your horse.

G.
     
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    12-03-2011, 01:56 AM
  #12
Green Broke
Great info Guilherme, thank you!

I have looked up Dr. Bennet's books before but never ordered them. I will definitely consider it. Conformation is a fascinating subject.

I have never been a snaffle bit nazi. I guess it's because I learned to ride western (neck reining with very little contact). So I never considered curb bits cruel because I basically rode without contact 99% of the time.

It is actually now about 17 years into horse ownership that I have learned the beauty of the snaffle and riding two handed with contact. It look a good friends to show me how. Because I rode for years neck reining, feeling the horse's mouth is a privilege of sorts and I feel I have pretty soft hands. Riding with two sets of bits/reins though is something I am not ready for. So admire you for moving up to that.

I am not very familiar with the Marchadors but I saw a snippet of them one time on RFD TV and what I really liked about them is they were allowed to move out. I always felt the Paso Finos (or maybe it's the Peruvian Pasos) looked like sewing machines moving up and down but going nowhere. So it's good to see horses actually allowed to travel when they gait.
     
    12-03-2011, 03:10 AM
  #13
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
Great info Guilherme, thank you!

I have looked up Dr. Bennet's books before but never ordered them. I will definitely consider it. Conformation is a fascinating subject.


Those books are wonderful. They have way more information than a person can digest in a single reading. Well worth ordering.

I have never been a snaffle bit nazi. I guess it's because I learned to ride western (neck reining with very little contact). So I never considered curb bits cruel because I basically rode without contact 99% of the time.

It is actually now about 17 years into horse ownership that I have learned the beauty of the snaffle and riding two handed with contact. It look a good friends to show me how. Because I rode for years neck reining, feeling the horse's mouth is a privilege of sorts and I feel I have pretty soft hands. Riding with two sets of bits/reins though is something I am not ready for. So admire you for moving up to that.

I think that is a most wondeful way to word the way I feel about direct reining.; that feeling the horse's mouth is a privilege.

I am not very familiar with the Marchadors but I saw a snippet of them one time on RFD TV and what I really liked about them is they were allowed to move out. I always felt the Paso Finos (or maybe it's the Peruvian Pasos) looked like sewing machines moving up and down but going nowhere. So it's good to see horses actually allowed to travel when they gait.

By the way, the hrose the Dr. Bennet rides is a gaited horse.
     
    12-04-2011, 11:19 PM
  #14
Yearling
Ride her collected, like any other horse. Despite the fact that she is gaited does not mean that she shouldn't ride collected. A friend of mine schools Tennessee Walking Horses at the barn that she manages, and she rides them collected and on the bit like all of the other non-gaited horses that she rides. They are completely capable and it helps improve improve their gait. I am going through this same process with my gaited Arabian x Bashkir Curly, who also exhibits the foxtrot :) Slowly, she is coming around. It does take time, but you will end up with a smoother ride and a happier horse in the end.
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