The Gait--bad for horses? Help! - Page 3
 
 

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The Gait--bad for horses? Help!

This is a discussion on The Gait--bad for horses? Help! within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category

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        04-21-2013, 07:11 PM
      #21
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by disastercupcake    
    That seems like an odd statement. I have had Tennessee Walkers that naturally gaited and could not trot or pace if their life depended on it... Of course we don't ask for the gait 100% of the time, but if that's all they give, then it's what the horse is most comfortable doing. IMO, there's no reason to have a gaited horse trot if its not their natural thing.

    I didn't say anything about trotting. The ordinary walk counts as not gaiting too.
         
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        04-22-2013, 08:00 AM
      #22
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by disastercupcake    
    That seems like an odd statement. I have had Tennessee Walkers that naturally gaited and could not trot or pace if their life depended on it... Of course we don't ask for the gait 100% of the time, but if that's all they give, then it's what the horse is most comfortable doing. IMO, there's no reason to have a gaited horse trot if its not their natural thing.
    Some extremely lateral gaited horses have difficulty with the canter. Learning to trot has the effect of "breaking" this extreme lateral gait and permits work at the canter. This work has the advantage for the horse in using its body in a new and beneficial way as well as allowing use of the canter to build wind.

    This use is narrow and ought to be done only by people who know what they are doing. But it is an option that benefits the horse, long term.

    G.
    HorseCrazyTeen likes this.
         
        04-22-2013, 01:03 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Guilherme    
    Some extremely lateral gaited horses have difficulty with the canter. Learning to trot has the effect of "breaking" this extreme lateral gait and permits work at the canter. This work has the advantage for the horse in using its body in a new and beneficial way as well as allowing use of the canter to build wind.

    This use is narrow and ought to be done only by people who know what they are doing. But it is an option that benefits the horse, long term.

    G.
    Yes I completely agree. Work at the trot and even the slow walk has improved my Walker's canter immensely. He also has much less tendency to break gait when he is gaiting. Seems to improve overall balance and musculature.

    But I've had Walkers -one in particular- that were born gaiting and couldn't trot at all. It didn't matter what we tried, that horse was just not a trotter.
    Corporal likes this.
         
        04-22-2013, 08:33 PM
      #24
    Yearling
    This is all very interesting, and I"m really glad for everyone's imput! I tried doing a search at my college's library for e-resources, but for the FEW articles that do exist, we do not have access.

    It's a shame that there hasn't been more studies.
         
        04-22-2013, 09:39 PM
      #25
    Foal
    This isn't true. You do not have to train a non-gaited horse to trot or canter. What is done is the horse is trained to carry a rider. When you push a "normal" horse past the walk they will trot, when pushed past the trot they will canter.

    When many gaited horses are pushed past the walk they have a variety of gaits to choose from: pace/trot/gait. Gait training is the rider teaching the horse to hold a particular gait.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sillyhorses    
    Consider training a horse under saddle, non-gaited (since that is what you have experience with): you have to train the horse to WALK under saddle, you have to train the horse to TROT under saddle, and you have to train the horse to CANTER under saddle (non-gaited)... the same applies to gaited horses... which is what I was getting at. .
         
        04-22-2013, 09:48 PM
      #26
    Yearling
    I think sillyhorses meant that you have to train a non-gaited horse to walk, trot, and canter correctly and on cue. The same applies to gaited horses, like she said. You have to train them to walk, gait/whatever, and canter correctly and on cue. I do see her point there, don't you?
         
        04-23-2013, 12:35 AM
      #27
    Foal
    She could have meant that, but it didn't seem like it.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by HorseCrazyTeen    
    I think sillyhorses meant that you have to train a non-gaited horse to walk, trot, and canter correctly and on cue. The same applies to gaited horses, like she said. You have to train them to walk, gait/whatever, and canter correctly and on cue. I do see her point there, don't you?
         
        04-23-2013, 02:24 PM
      #28
    Yearling
    That's how I took it, but how did you take it? Just curious, because I see your point in your post, too.
         
        04-23-2013, 02:36 PM
      #29
    Trained
    Both of my gaited horses will trot when in the pasture. IMO, all gaited horses have 6 gaits, including:
    Trot
    Pace
    Broken Washing Machine--on the days when they hate you.
    demonwolfmoon likes this.
         
        04-23-2013, 02:42 PM
      #30
    Yearling
    LOL. I completely agree about the broken washing machine.
         

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