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Gaited Dressage?

This is a discussion on Gaited Dressage? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Jennie jackson dressage

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    10-29-2013, 10:00 PM
  #21
Foal
I totally disagree, a good gait is a good gait no matter if it is a trot or another gait.

All gaits have defined movements and purity of gait, I just honestly think it is this very narrow idea that anything other than a trot is garbage, and nothing could be further from the truth. All true gaited horse trainers agree on what a good gait is, and yes, opinions can be subjective, but we have standards for the gaits all written down in black and white. There are a few books that go into the mechanics of gait, what the gait looks like, and how it should feel, so if judges cannot understand the footfall than maybe they need more training.

I find properly riding a gaited horse requires much more intuneness to have proper impulse and rhythm of gait, much harder than a simple trot.

Gaited dressage will be nothing but a good thing for gaited riders and gaited horses, and eventually the haters will have to accept that these are just horses and only thing separating them is just that gaited horses have extra gaits that make them so much smoother to ride.

Gaited horses have a very long and storied history, they were the horse of choice before carriages, when people rode from Point A to Point B. I have never understood why trotting horses (and trotting comes from the Latin word for torture by the way :) ) get put on a pedestal as the ideal horse and the trot the ideal gait. Outside of driving, the trot is hard on horses and hard on riders, that was the reason why gaited horses were so popular.

Gaited horses do have a reputation as being "easy" and yes, a good gaited horse can make the rider look good even if they don't deserve it. Yet, when a gaited horse and rider team hit that perfect moment when they are in tune and the gait is driving from behind it is just as beautiful than a trotting horse and rider.
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    11-01-2013, 11:38 AM
  #22
Trained
I would just like it if you could show with good grooming and NOT have to clip!! My horses spend most of the year in turnout, and I don't want to take the protective feathers or ear hair off.
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    11-01-2013, 11:50 AM
  #23
Trained
^^ I never clip whiskers or ears!
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    11-02-2013, 03:49 AM
  #24
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal    
I would just like it if you could show with good grooming and NOT have to clip!! My horses spend most of the year in turnout, and I don't want to take the protective feathers or ear hair off.
I'm in the same boat! I would show more often if I didn't have to clip... Although I still go to local shows looking like I dragged my horse out of the field and hosed him off >.<

Although I'm getting pretty skills with the scissors... you can get most of the really big stuff and still look pretty good :)
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    11-02-2013, 09:56 AM
  #25
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by disastercupcake    
I'm in the same boat! I would show more often if I didn't have to clip... Although I still go to local shows looking like I dragged my horse out of the field and hosed him off >.<

Although I'm getting pretty skills with the scissors... you can get most of the really big stuff and still look pretty good :)
Same here! I suppose if you're going to the big shows and your horse lives in a box stall it doesn't make a difference, but for outside horses they should have their ear/face hair. I clipped years ago when I showed hunters/equitation, but if I could show my Icelandic in the local shows I would leave him alone.
     
    11-02-2013, 10:27 AM
  #26
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by disastercupcake    
Well I did a basic search, found a bunch of horses doing training level really well (which we do), but by 2nd level, they tend to be able to do lateral in ONE direction well, and not the other.. lol

Also, found this guy he seems to think that horses are incapable of raising the back and gaiting... I think that is altogether bunk.
I completely agree with you disastercupcake. This man on the video must be speaking of Saddlebreds, because naturally gaited horses are wired to gait. By hollowing a naturally gaited horse makes many of them pace. I have found that by rounding my TWHs back makes a more pure flat walk that is engaged from back to front into a light snaffle bit contact.
     
    11-02-2013, 10:39 AM
  #27
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idrivetrotters    
I totally disagree, a good gait is a good gait no matter if it is a trot or another gait.

All gaits have defined movements and purity of gait, I just honestly think it is this very narrow idea that anything other than a trot is garbage, and nothing could be further from the truth. All true gaited horse trainers agree on what a good gait is, and yes, opinions can be subjective, but we have standards for the gaits all written down in black and white. There are a few books that go into the mechanics of gait, what the gait looks like, and how it should feel, so if judges cannot understand the footfall than maybe they need more training.

I find properly riding a gaited horse requires much more intuneness to have proper impulse and rhythm of gait, much harder than a simple trot.

Gaited dressage will be nothing but a good thing for gaited riders and gaited horses, and eventually the haters will have to accept that these are just horses and only thing separating them is just that gaited horses have extra gaits that make them so much smoother to ride.

Gaited horses have a very long and storied history, they were the horse of choice before carriages, when people rode from Point A to Point B. I have never understood why trotting horses (and trotting comes from the Latin word for torture by the way :) ) get put on a pedestal as the ideal horse and the trot the ideal gait. Outside of driving, the trot is hard on horses and hard on riders, that was the reason why gaited horses were so popular.

Gaited horses do have a reputation as being "easy" and yes, a good gaited horse can make the rider look good even if they don't deserve it. Yet, when a gaited horse and rider team hit that perfect moment when they are in tune and the gait is driving from behind it is just as beautiful than a trotting horse and rider.
I completely agree with you Idrivetrotters. Dressage training brings out the best of the horse's innate gaits and abilities whether they naturally trot or naturally gait. I have seen dozens of pacey gaited horses that were ridden hollow and high-headed in a shank bit, be transformed quickly into their innate four-beat gait with a comfortable well fitting snaffle bit and using dressage methods of lowering the head and neck, lifting the back, forwardness into balance and relaxation.
     
    11-02-2013, 10:46 AM
  #28
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by disastercupcake    
I'm in the same boat! I would show more often if I didn't have to clip... Although I still go to local shows looking like I dragged my horse out of the field and hosed him off >.<

Although I'm getting pretty skills with the scissors... you can get most of the really big stuff and still look pretty good :)
I think it depends where you show. I've never had to clip or braid my TWH for schooling dressage shows. In fact, you don't even have to wear the formal outfit. The only thing they require is riding in a snaffle bit, English all-purpose or dressage saddle and the rider wearing a helmet, boots with a heel, and casual attire.

But if you are showing in a dressage class at a recognized breed show, you will need to clip and braid.
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    11-05-2013, 01:27 PM
  #29
Foal
If anyone is interested in watching what higher levels of dressage look like on a gaited horse, I found this on youtube by Jennie Jackson riding her TWH stallion Champagne Watchout. 6_2007_MNFS_Rev_7-07.wmv - YouTube
     
    11-05-2013, 02:04 PM
  #30
Started
I even heard one local DQ ("dressage queen"; not a complimentary moniker ) tell me that a Lippizaner is "really not a very good Dressage horse." I told her that she should contact the Spanish Riding School immediately and tell them that they have been wrong for the last 500 years in their style of horse. I think she may have taken offense at that!


My Lippi just pinned his ears after reading that comment. Good for you to set her straight :)
     

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