Gaited horses and back muscle deterioration - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 11-26-2013, 01:28 AM Thread Starter
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Gaited horses and back muscle deterioration

ok so I have noticed a lot more recently gaited horses for sale that have literally NO back muscles all of these horses are supposedly gaited and are offered for sale as such but I was wondering what causes that loss of back muscle? And why i'm I only seeing the gaited horses look like that I know there not supposed to and all but what can cause it? A ill fitting saddle? Lack of care I know will but what else?

"You never know what's under all the dust and dirt unless your willing to get your hands dirty and find out" - Diamonds in the Rough
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post #2 of 9 Old 11-26-2013, 06:43 AM
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Originally Posted by darkiss4428 View Post
ok so I have noticed a lot more recently gaited horses for sale that have literally NO back muscles all of these horses are supposedly gaited and are offered for sale as such but I was wondering what causes that loss of back muscle? And why i'm I only seeing the gaited horses look like that I know there not supposed to and all but what can cause it? A ill fitting saddle? Lack of care I know will but what else?
More than likely it's because a huge percentage of gaited horses are ridden "inverted" and this does not cause good back muscle development.

G.
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post #3 of 9 Old 11-26-2013, 03:42 PM Thread Starter
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More than likely it's because a huge percentage of gaited horses are ridden "inverted" and this does not cause good back muscle development.

G.
could you please explain in detail? Im just wondering thanks

"You never know what's under all the dust and dirt unless your willing to get your hands dirty and find out" - Diamonds in the Rough
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post #4 of 9 Old 11-26-2013, 06:20 PM
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Most gaited horses I've seen are ridden in a wrong frame. Instead of rounding and using their back muscles, they are ridden with the back hallow. This does not help in the development of back muscles.
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post #5 of 9 Old 11-26-2013, 06:23 PM
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All horses have to learn how to stretch their back, mostly , example, follow the bit to the ground. If you are riding and your horse reaches for a bite of grass, can you feel his back come up? That's what you want. To rack, a gaited horse needs to do the opposite, head up and back hollowed, legs not reaching under.

My gf has a horse that had back trouble and the plan was he had some kind of acupuncture with medicine, and then on robaxin for a few weeks, in the meantime, get him to use the muscles he had been trying to avoid using.
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post #6 of 9 Old 11-26-2013, 09:44 PM Thread Starter
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dose this cause back muscle atrophy?
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post #7 of 9 Old 11-27-2013, 10:45 AM
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dose this cause back muscle atrophy?
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It causes lack of development.

You don't want to bascule a gaited horse too aggessively or you can contert a pace into trot. You do want to engage the back end and tap the power of the rear do drive the horse forward. This will also give a pleasing head set.

The leg is used to do this. You push the horse into the bit (you DO NOT pull the bit back to yhe horse). If you are riding a "chair seat" you don't have effective use of the leg and you'll likely be riding an inverted horse. The specifics of doing this vary somewhat from discipline to discipline.

A mal-developed back is usually indicative of poor riding practices or, someimes, just lack of work.

G.
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post #8 of 9 Old 11-27-2013, 11:07 AM
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dose this cause back muscle atrophy?
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It's like the other poster said...not atrophy but lack of development. Atrophy would mean they once had the muscle and lost it, but they probably never had it.
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post #9 of 9 Old 11-28-2013, 10:12 PM Thread Starter
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I've seen some pretty bad like my mare rogue wherr you can count the bones in the spine I know she was malnourished when I got her but I've been seeing healthy looking horses for sale like that( that dosent mean they are healthy they just look it)

"You never know what's under all the dust and dirt unless your willing to get your hands dirty and find out" - Diamonds in the Rough
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