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having hoof problems

This is a discussion on having hoof problems within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Why the farrier chopped off toe
  • Tennessee walker hoof shoes?

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    11-17-2011, 04:57 AM
  #11
Weanling
I personally would give it more time.. I think it sounds like shoddy farrier work not the result of going bare. Like people said. 60% of weight is in front. So his its back that hurt...most likely the result of his crummy trim. With a long toe and no heel he most definitely did not do a natural balance trim or he did an aweful version. The first time my boy got his shoes of and a natural balance trim I gasped silently as the farrier just chopped off his toe and rolled his walls. But I had never seen it before. Now, seriously everyone but one person has switched to the new Farrier I found. My gelding was sore for 3 weeks to a month after removing shoes but only on gravel..and it was both his front(he was shod in front bare in back) I would switch Farriers and see what they say. He may need shoes for a bit for that heel to grow out.
I know we don't have natural horses. But I really believe if your horse can go barefoot it is the way to go.. my geldings hooves look AMAZING now due to going barefoot. His frogs make me giddy everytime I clean his feet. There was a lot of chipping in the beginning but now I ride him over gravel, pavement, trail rides with rocky terrain and those feet stay gorgeous. He also hasn't been lame once. His shoes were pulled in spring so the mud and moisture of paddock didn't help him toughen just kept his hooves soft ready for rocks to hurt. LOOSIE can give you a lot of good tips as far as what to look for in a farrier.
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    11-17-2011, 09:04 AM
  #12
Green Broke
Why not just put boots on when you ride?
     
    11-17-2011, 09:10 AM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kymbadina    
I personally would give it more time.. I think it sounds like shoddy farrier work not the result of going bare. Like people said. 60% of weight is in front. So his its back that hurt...most likely the result of his crummy trim. With a long toe and no heel he most definitely did not do a natural balance trim or he did an aweful version. The first time my boy got his shoes of and a natural balance trim I gasped silently as the farrier just chopped off his toe and rolled his walls. But I had never seen it before. Now, seriously everyone but one person has switched to the new Farrier I found. My gelding was sore for 3 weeks to a month after removing shoes but only on gravel..and it was both his front(he was shod in front bare in back) I would switch Farriers and see what they say. He may need shoes for a bit for that heel to grow out.
I know we don't have natural horses. But I really believe if your horse can go barefoot it is the way to go.. my geldings hooves look AMAZING now due to going barefoot. His frogs make me giddy everytime I clean his feet. There was a lot of chipping in the beginning but now I ride him over gravel, pavement, trail rides with rocky terrain and those feet stay gorgeous. He also hasn't been lame once. His shoes were pulled in spring so the mud and moisture of paddock didn't help him toughen just kept his hooves soft ready for rocks to hurt. LOOSIE can give you a lot of good tips as far as what to look for in a farrier.
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the vet is not so sure he is hurting in the rear.He had a Bactria build up a month ago in the front right.After using Koppertox and hoof flex for a week he is healed but still growing back what Koppertox sluffed away.Now when I told the vet this he smiled and said well that's probably whats wrong with the back left.When a horse is hurting in the front the back opposite will favor as well.Something about the way the step.It counter acts. He as well said give it time but the trimming was a whole other issue at hand he wasn't happy with the toe being so long. And he showed were he would like that toe to start and I gasped at well.He wanted a third taken off .I am looking for a new farrier
     
    11-17-2011, 11:18 AM
  #14
Super Moderator
I am not trying to promote any barefoot sites but here's a sample of how far back the toes get trimmed

SNHC*|*Barefoot Trimming Photos

This is my 24 yr old metabolic horse's hooves. He has always been on the flat-footed side; he isn't any more flat-footed now than he was as a three yr old. These belong to the horse in my avatar who is a Tennessee Walker.

This is at 5 weeks.


All buffed up and ready to hit a lick


View from the top.


These were a year ago when the Trimmer was working on everyone.

I have since taken everyone's hooves back and have tightened these hooves up a bit more. Since developing metabolic issues, wall separation on the fronts is an issue for this horse. I tidy his fronts up every 2-3 weeks because he grows toe so fast.

At any rate, just wanted you to see (from the bottom of the hoof) why you shouldn't panic:)

It may take a bit of time, especially if your horse's heels are pretty high but he will get there. Lowering heels should be done gradually if they're too high, so as to give the tendons a chance to catch up.

That process might be able to be sped up since the ground is softer this time of year
     
    11-17-2011, 03:00 PM
  #15
Yearling
"Gaited horse farriers," as a class, will always cut back the heel and allow the toe to grow out. This is because that reduces the efficiency of the stride, holds the front foot on the ground longer, and that front foot will come off the ground at breakover with more energy. That give a more "impressive" stride.

If you are going for blue ribbons you want that "impressive stride." If you are riding for pleasure you want maximized efficiency of stride. That means a trim to anatomical correctness (usually a short toe and a more heel for a "stood up" foot).

I've personally fought this battle with three farriers over the years. I've discharged two because they would not follow my instructions. One figured out he had been badly informed by his "expert consultant" and ended up doing a fine job for the three years he worked for us.

If your horse needs shoes to stay sound then shoe him. Boots might work, but if the horse is unsound under saddle why would he suddenly turn sound when at liberty? Boots are generally a Bad Idea for turned out horses.

Your vet is right about "guarding."

G.
     
    11-17-2011, 10:04 PM
  #16
Weanling
Guarding?
     

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