Heeeeeeeeeelp!!
 
 

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Heeeeeeeeeelp!!

This is a discussion on Heeeeeeeeeelp!! within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category

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        06-01-2013, 02:36 AM
      #1
    Foal
    Exclamation Heeeeeeeeeelp!!

    Hello out there, I am in need of some helpful tips/constructive criticism or anything!!!. About 2 months ago my Dad got a Kentucky Mountain/Tennessee Walker Who has now proved to be too much horse for him so I am the main one that handles and rides her. Before he got her she recently had a traumatizing experience (barn fire).The lady that he got her from said it really hadn't effected her which is not true. From what I understand of her past for the last few years she was used mainly as a brood mare and for occasional light trail riding but before that she was shown, I'm not sure how far she went or anything like that. Anyways She is a VERY nervous horse im not familiar with gaited horses so I don't know if they are all like that but that is how she is. I have since contacted the lady and asked her when the last time she had been worked with consistently, has she always been this nervous, what kind of training she has had etc... Her old owner assured me that she is just nervous because she needs to get to trust me and once she does she will take me anywhere but at this point I really can't see that happening. As far as the training and being worked with the lady has no idea the type of training she has had and she was not worked with much in the last few years. The 2 main problems im having are (1) her nervousness is the biggest I would say, how can I get her to calm down and pay attention to me when im in the saddle because that's when its at its height. (2) Any tips on helping me learn how she was trained. What cues and aids I might be giving or not giving to her for example, when I first get on her she does this thing where she backs up really fast and then goes sideways. Its very strange to me because like I said before not knowledgeable on gaited horses at all which is why I am trying to educate myself. So If anyone has advise please don't hesitate to share.
         
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        06-01-2013, 03:02 AM
      #2
    Foal
    I would go WAY back to the basics with her. Lunging her, doing lots of woeing on a line so when you get into saddle and say woe she won't do a funky sidestep. Work her on the same cues you use on your other horses, but go slow. Spend sometime saddling, lunging and then putting her away. Work her up to you being in the saddle.
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        06-01-2013, 03:05 AM
      #3
    Foal
    Also this will help her gain trust in you and calm down. But like I said I would just start at the beginning. If she is a nervous horse it could take quite a bit of time and training.
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        06-01-2013, 03:05 AM
      #4
    Foal
    Sorry- calm her down*
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        06-01-2013, 03:11 AM
      #5
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mollymay    
    Also this will help her gain trust in you and calm down. But like I said I would just start at the beginning. If she is a nervous horse it could take quite a bit of time and training.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Thanks so much for your advise I will give it a try
         
        06-01-2013, 04:02 AM
      #6
    Banned
    Walkers are just that way- especially show walkers- they usually keep faintin goats with em to make them less nervous.

    Mine likes to be wild eyed and look at everything trippin over her own feet- I just give her a jerk of the reins (if she's lookin left- ill jerk the rein right- etcetra.. not a huge yank just a small jerk jerk of the rein) to tell her to pay attention to me and look ahead- not be lookin all over the place bein a bonehead, lol.

    For the not standin still for mounting- you need to mount and just sit there still for a few minutes- jump off and do it again till she learns to stand still when you mount- when she does stand still wait the few seconds and then go off down the trail or wherever you was goin to show her that's what you wanted and if she stands still then you can go.


    Our walkin horse was supposed to be 'child broke' and was not even green broke! She had been used as a leadline horse for children.. go figure! lots of work and dedication is what makes a good ridin horse. How are her cues? What all does she do?
         
        06-01-2013, 04:15 AM
      #7
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by toto    
    Walkers are just that way- especially show walkers- they usually keep faintin goats with em to make them less nervous.

    Mine likes to be wild eyed and look at everything trippin over her own feet- I just give her a jerk of the reins (if she's lookin left- ill jerk the rein right- etcetra.. not a huge yank just a small jerk jerk of the rein) to tell her to pay attention to me and look ahead- not be lookin all over the place bein a bonehead, lol.

    For the not standin still for mounting- you need to mount and just sit there still for a few minutes- jump off and do it again till she learns to stand still when you mount- when she does stand still wait the few seconds and then go off down the trail or wherever you was goin to show her that's what you wanted and if she stands still then you can go.


    Our walkin horse was supposed to be 'child broke' and was not even green broke! She had been used as a leadline horse for children.. go figure! lots of work and dedication is what makes a good ridin horse. How are her cues? What all does she do?

    Hey thanks for the reply, I've been told that's how they are just full of energy and that's OK with me I just want her to listen to me when im on her back... And she stands just fine when I go to mount her but as soon as I'm on her back she does that crazy speed back walk. I'm working on correcting that by making her spin around in a tight circle until she stops then I release the pressure on her reins she gets it after a few times. And as far as cues I'm really giving her the only ones I know the ones I would use on my other horses... You know I tell her to walk and she walks, slightly pull back on the reins and say back when I want her to back up, squeeze to walk faster, kick to canter and a steady pull back and a woah to stop her, real basic stuff . I really want to use her as a trail horse but she is soooo spooky and that's what I really want to work on with her...
         
        06-01-2013, 02:59 PM
      #8
    Started
    I don't want to be rude, but I'm tending to think, that you don't know a great deal about training or riding. You don't 'kick' a horse to canter. Many who have never ridden a gaited breed, are surprised at the speed and think the horse is sort of 'taking off', when really it is only gaiting.

    If you intend to keep this horse, I think you might need someone knowledgeable to help you. And start from basics. No riding yet. Just solid ground work.

    I think the horse may never have had proper training and is not only nervous, but maybe confused.

    Lizzie
         
        06-01-2013, 03:10 PM
      #9
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FeatheredFeet    
    I don't want to be rude, but I'm tending to think, that you don't know a great deal about training or riding. You don't 'kick' a horse to canter. Many who have never ridden a gaited breed, are surprised at the speed and think the horse is sort of 'taking off', when really it is only gaiting.

    If you intend to keep this horse, I think you might need someone knowledgeable to help you. And start from basics. No riding yet. Just solid ground work.

    I think the horse may never have had proper training and is not only nervous, but maybe confused.

    Lizzie
    Thanks for the reply, you are right about me not knowing much about training horses. I've really never needed to know much about it as the horses that I had before her had never needed any extra training. But I am considering hiring a trainer to come out and help me and her :)
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        06-01-2013, 03:25 PM
      #10
    Started
    Good for you. It would be the best thing to do for the horse and for you. Keep us posted as to your progress.

    Lizzie
    wausuaw and stevenson like this.
         

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