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post #11 of 30 Old 06-01-2013, 05:01 PM
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I don't know of this will help you any, but look at her diet too.
When my RMH first came home, he was a reactive knothead. Spooky, pushy, cranky, and all around difficult.
The previous farm fed sweet feed, but he was in a big herd turned out 24/7 and didn't get much of it. A friend kept my horse at her farm for two months while I found a good companion for him, and she kept her horses stalled at night and fed sweet feed. It was too much for him and that's when the knuckledheadedness really took over.

In my research about Rockys, I learned that they can very easy keepers. So much so, they are affectionately called "air ferns." That proved to be the case with my horse and as soon as I got him off a grain based diet, his temperament improved drastically!
He is now the sweet, lovable,and mellow horse he is meant to be and far more pleasant to be around.

If you are familiar with Ration Balancers (a type of forage based supplement) these can be just the right diet for Rockys.
Anyway, it may be worth looking into.
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post #12 of 30 Old 06-01-2013, 05:58 PM
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I agree with Lockwood if she's on grain, reduce it to zero. Don't think of the barn fire or her past or this will stifle your work with her. Being she's somewhat reactionary you may have to teach her in inches. Sometimes you think you're getting nowhere then one day the horse connects the dots and progress! Get a good trainer to help you periodically. You will learn so much and the trainer will give you things to practisel
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post #13 of 30 Old 06-01-2013, 08:14 PM
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This trust thing, get more folks in trouble. Horse are incapable of trusting. Trust is a trait reserved in this world for humans only. She will never trust you, not possible. BUT, horses are very, very aware of their surrounding and the treatment they get, ie, they learn just like a dog, with repetitive actions. Except, horses are much, much, more aware of their surrounding and treatment A horse can read your demeanor, probably better than your mother. So don't underestimate their capabilities.

Forget, trying to get her to trust you, it won't happen. The nervousness, may or may not be relating to her breeding. Whether it is, or not, it's cure is from the ground. Trying to fix it from the saddle, is like putting the egg before the chicken. Most of the time nervousness gets better with lots and lots of work, then getting them to stop and stand calm and quiet, after the work. All from the ground.

Bob
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post #14 of 30 Old 06-02-2013, 12:25 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lockwood View Post
I don't know of this will help you any, but look at her diet too.
When my RMH first came home, he was a reactive knothead. Spooky, pushy, cranky, and all around difficult.
The previous farm fed sweet feed, but he was in a big herd turned out 24/7 and didn't get much of it. A friend kept my horse at her farm for two months while I found a good companion for him, and she kept her horses stalled at night and fed sweet feed. It was too much for him and that's when the knuckledheadedness really took over.

In my research about Rockys, I learned that they can very easy keepers. So much so, they are affectionately called "air ferns." That proved to be the case with my horse and as soon as I got him off a grain based diet, his temperament improved drastically!
He is now the sweet, lovable,and mellow horse he is meant to be and far more pleasant to be around.

If you are familiar with Ration Balancers (a type of forage based supplement) these can be just the right diet for Rockys.
Anyway, it may be worth looking into.
Thanks for the reply, as far as her diet goes when I first got her she was just on alfalfa no gain or supplements. She was a little under weight too but since having her she has lost tons of weight because my other mares will chase her away from her food. So now I've separated her and put her on senior grain, a supplement witch has oats in it and beet pulp but as far as I can tell its not really made a difference on her hotness and energy level. I want to take her off the gain but she is a pretty hard keeper and I dont know if beet pulp and hay will be enough.
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post #15 of 30 Old 06-02-2013, 12:32 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbsmfg3 View Post
This trust thing, get more folks in trouble. Horse are incapable of trusting. Trust is a trait reserved in this world for humans only. She will never trust you, not possible. BUT, horses are very, very aware of their surrounding and the treatment they get, ie, they learn just like a dog, with repetitive actions. Except, horses are much, much, more aware of their surrounding and treatment A horse can read your demeanor, probably better than your mother. So don't underestimate their capabilities.

Forget, trying to get her to trust you, it won't happen. The nervousness, may or may not be relating to her breeding. Whether it is, or not, it's cure is from the ground. Trying to fix it from the saddle, is like putting the egg before the chicken. Most of the time nervousness gets better with lots and lots of work, then getting them to stop and stand calm and quiet, after the work. All from the ground.

Yea I think the whole "trust" thing is kind of bogus at least in the way people tend to use it. Anyways, when I first got her I thought I would need to start from the ground and I did when I finally did get on her she was nervous at first but calms down and gets to work. But as soon as I move her from the arena she goes nuts and does the back up really fast and sideways moving it just seems to be in areas shes not familiar with. I can ride her in her pasture and arena just fine but anywhere else she gets very nervous so any advise on how I can get her to be relaxed anywhere I ask her to go?
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post #16 of 30 Old 06-02-2013, 03:32 AM
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Wait- wuuuuh? Horses do trust humans though- if they dont trust you wont eat them theyd be skeptical of your every move in fear theyd be dinner, lol.. right?

I know there is no 'bond' a horse has with a human but i think its definitely a trusting relationship between the two.. or id hope! I trust my buddy- my buddy better trust me back, lol.

Your horse will relax in due time- shes probably nervous being in a new environment with new people- give her some time to get to know you- love on her and brush her and just be real calm any time youre around her- i used to hum to the mare id ride when id groom her to sooth her.. sounds silly but it does calm them- if youre real hyper and flyin all over shell be actin silly too, lol.

Last edited by toto; 06-02-2013 at 03:38 AM.
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post #17 of 30 Old 06-02-2013, 09:21 AM
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From what you've said about her being calm at times, it doesn't sound like it's bred into her.

We've found the majority of horses retain what we're trying to teach them, much better, when they are tired. You might try getting her dog tired before taking her to a nervous location. And don't let her rest in the nervous location(s) until the nervousness disappears.

BUT, before trying this, she must know a good whoa, taught from the ground. I can not overemphasize the importance of good ground work.

Bob
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post #18 of 30 Old 06-02-2013, 09:52 AM
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"Wait- wuuuuh? Horses do trust humans though- if they don't trust you wont eat them theyd be skeptical of your every move in fear theyd be dinner, lol.. right?" Wrong.

This is a good example of the difference between trust and training. Horses are taught from the time they are born in captivity to know humans will not eat them, why, because the human has never given the horse a reason to fear being eaten. Horses do respond to hurt, but it must be done correctly. A horse will not retain memory of an action it has performed for more than 3 seconds. The trainer that has a horse misbehave, then takes it to the wood shed for the proverbial spanking, is teaching he horse the wood shed is a place of pain, and will then fear the wood shed, rather than fear the misbehavior that occurred minutes ago.

Horses want to be where it is comfortable. You do not need to "love on them, brush them, or sing to them" to make them comfortable. They are very comfortable, just being near a human that is not a threat to them. This is why, the "join-up" routine works with horses. You make it more comfortable to be near to you, rather than, working away from you. The "loving on them, etc", does nothing for the horse, but everything for the human. It puts the human in a demeanor acceptable to the horse. The same thing, can be accomplished just by standing by them, and doing absolutely nothing. The outlaw, can some times be cured, by simply spending a lot of nothing time with a human.

Your nervous horse must be taught, that what ever it is causing her flight instinct to come forth, will not hurt her when you are near. Allowing her to be nervous while your are near, is teaching her to be nervous.
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Last edited by bbsmfg3; 06-02-2013 at 09:59 AM.
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post #19 of 30 Old 06-02-2013, 03:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbsmfg3 View Post

Your nervous horse must be taught, that what ever it is causing her flight instinct to come forth, will not hurt her when you are near. Allowing her to be nervous while your are near, is teaching her to be nervous.

but to confide in someone or rely on them is to trust them. You can not have a confident horse with out them trusting you as the leader.. you must trust the leader to lead you down the correct path- to keep you safe- right or am i wrong again? Lol.
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post #20 of 30 Old 06-02-2013, 04:38 PM
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I ride Peruvians and Pasos Finos, which are hot breeds. They can be taught to stand still. I can't stand all that dancing and prancing until I ask for it. Until then they should stand like a rock. It does take time to teach though, but it can be done even with the hottest of horses.
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