How does neglected hooves affect the gait?
 
 

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How does neglected hooves affect the gait?

This is a discussion on How does neglected hooves affect the gait? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Doe yearling goat hooves that grow abnormally long
  • Neglected horse hooves

 
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    04-06-2009, 01:18 PM
  #1
Zab
Yearling
How does neglected hooves affect the gait?

Hi!

I think I have the lowest IQ in the country at the moment..

My horse has become very trotty in his gait (tölt) and I'e wondered why, tried everything.

The farrier was here today, I noticed a while ago that I've forgotten to call him on time.. it's now 3.5 months since he was here!
Crows hooves wasn't very long concidering this, but he has started hitting his fronthooves the past two days.

And first now I figure.. can his neglected hooves be the cause of the sudden trotty-ness in his rack?

He has new shoes now and next appointment is booked in time! *sigh* I'm so stupid.
     
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    04-06-2009, 01:21 PM
  #2
Weanling
I know that long hooves on my appaloosa can cause him to stumble more and have a very hoppy canter if I go two weeks over his due date. So I could see that, yeah, this can affect other gaits too like the tölt.
     
    04-08-2009, 11:14 PM
  #3
Trained
Definitely. Improper balance in the hooves will affect gait. He could also be sore from it -- in his feet, legs, shoulder and back. I'll bet you'll keep better track of his farrier schedule now though!
     
    04-09-2009, 02:58 AM
  #4
Zab
Yearling
Yeah, and I usually keep track of it! I guess it's everything around us that fogged my memory this time.. :S

I don't think he was sore, but I suppose I can't be sure. At least he's back to normal now :) ..so we're back to the old problems.. xD

I just wonder.. this time when I practically skipped an appointment (if you see to the rime) his hoof was maybe 1/3 of an inch too long.. when I bought him one of his hooves were 2 or 3 inches too long and started to bent upwards.. how long was it since he had hoof care at that point?! :O Obviously his hooves doesn't grow abnormally fast..
     
    04-09-2009, 09:11 AM
  #5
Trained
Glad to hear things are better already. 1/3" isn't much, but when you are demanding show-quality, it could make the difference I guess. For my backyard girls I wouldn't even notice that, but they sure would! It's sad how some people neglect horses. 2 - 3 inches too long is really bad. Thanks that he has a good home now!
     
    04-09-2009, 05:01 PM
  #6
Green Broke
If the trim doesn't completely correct the trotting issue, please consider having a chiropractor look at him.

When my then 3 yo TWH suddenly couldn't hold his running walk for more than 30 feet while under saddle, I called the chiropractor.

Seems the rambunctious young lad had managed to put his Atlas bone (head/neck) and sacrum (butt) out of whack playing in the pasture somehow.

I gave him two weeks off and when I got back on him, he was a gaitin' fool with a beautiful classic TWH head shake

He actually held his running walk (at an intermediate speed) on his own for a mile coming home. I tried to slow him down but he would have none of it, so I left him have a good time
     
    04-09-2009, 10:45 PM
  #7
Zab
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by northernmama    
Glad to hear things are better already. 1/3" isn't much, but when you are demanding show-quality, it could make the difference I guess. For my backyard girls I wouldn't even notice that, but they sure would! It's sad how some people neglect horses. 2 - 3 inches too long is really bad. Thanks that he has a good home now!
He's just a ''backyard'' horse too, we're not close to show quality and anyway it doesn't excist any racking/gaiting shows for standies here. :P But his gaiting was getting extremely bad, which is weird since as you said; it realy doesn't seem much. Appearantly it is for him tho.
     
    04-09-2009, 10:47 PM
  #8
Zab
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
If the trim doesn't completely correct the trotting issue, please consider having a chiropractor look at him.

When my then 3 yo TWH suddenly couldn't hold his running walk for more than 30 feet while under saddle, I called the chiropractor.

Seems the rambunctious young lad had managed to put his Atlas bone (head/neck) and sacrum (butt) out of whack playing in the pasture somehow.

I gave him two weeks off and when I got back on him, he was a gaitin' fool with a beautiful classic TWH head shake

He actually held his running walk (at an intermediate speed) on his own for a mile coming home. I tried to slow him down but he would have none of it, so I left him have a good time
He's back to noral.. which isn't perfect but it's normal :) He can gait fairly clean again. Afterall he's only been ridden for some 6 months so it's much to ask for perfect-ness :P Especially with me as a rider.
     
    04-19-2009, 11:24 PM
  #9
Foal
Hi first time on the site not experiened on how this work but bere w/ me. I own a paso fino and I also have problems keeping her to be constent on her gait. I'm learning a lot tonight be reading the above entreys.thank's for the usefull chat.
     

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