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I'm looking into gaited horses. Help! :)

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    06-04-2012, 06:10 PM
  #61
Yearling
Try out a LOT of different horses from different breeds before you settle on the breed you want and remember that while breeds have characteristics all animals have distinct personalities. Just because they are a TWH doesn't mean that every TWH will ride the same. I've been on a plantation TWH that rode like I was sitting on a cloud. And I've been on a TWH that even gaiting correctly didn't come close. If they are a gaited breed, the gait is inherited. So is the color of your hair...but do you know how many shades of brown or blonde you can find on women??? So it is with gaits. Some horses gait from birth and are settled in their gaits from day one. Others need some encouragement. You can "set" a horse in its gait, and encourage a correct gait. If you've never ridden gaited horses, and they are new to you, this is not something you really want to attempt. It can be done, but ideally you should have some experience.
You can't teach just any horse to gait. If you could there would be a lot of cowboys riding fenceline on guarter horses that gaited. (Althouth there is something called an Indian Shuffle that crops up in quarter, apps and paint horses every once in awhile. It's basically a smooth running walk and highly prized.)

You can also take a young horse, and by faulty riding, wreck his gait. A lot of heavy people buy gaited horses because they assume it's easier. They don't have to post. What they find out is that unless the horse is built like a total tank, he ends up pacing. You do NOT want a horse that paces. Envision yourself in a blender...that's what it feels like.

So try a lot of horses...more than one from each breed and take your time. Look outside Virginia. Gaited horses are going to be more expensive in areas where they are scarce and less expensive where they are common. It only makes sense. Also, most areas of the country are still reeling from the downturn in the economy and people are looking to get out from under the expense of a horse. A good horse is a good horse whether you buy him from a gaited farm, or an individual owner. What is most important is that you have someone near you who knows what they are doing and is willing to help you if you run into problems.

Take your time. There are a lot of gaits out there and a lot of horses.
Good luck!
     
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    06-04-2012, 07:01 PM
  #62
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by HagonNag    
Try out a LOT of different horses from different breeds before you settle on the breed you want and remember that while breeds have characteristics all animals have distinct personalities. Just because they are a TWH doesn't mean that every TWH will ride the same. I've been on a plantation TWH that rode like I was sitting on a cloud. And I've been on a TWH that even gaiting correctly didn't come close. If they are a gaited breed, the gait is inherited. So is the color of your hair...but do you know how many shades of brown or blonde you can find on women??? So it is with gaits. Some horses gait from birth and are settled in their gaits from day one. Others need some encouragement. You can "set" a horse in its gait, and encourage a correct gait. If you've never ridden gaited horses, and they are new to you, this is not something you really want to attempt. It can be done, but ideally you should have some experience.
You can't teach just any horse to gait. If you could there would be a lot of cowboys riding fenceline on guarter horses that gaited. (Althouth there is something called an Indian Shuffle that crops up in quarter, apps and paint horses every once in awhile. It's basically a smooth running walk and highly prized.)

You can also take a young horse, and by faulty riding, wreck his gait. A lot of heavy people buy gaited horses because they assume it's easier. They don't have to post. What they find out is that unless the horse is built like a total tank, he ends up pacing. You do NOT want a horse that paces. Envision yourself in a blender...that's what it feels like.

So try a lot of horses...more than one from each breed and take your time. Look outside Virginia. Gaited horses are going to be more expensive in areas where they are scarce and less expensive where they are common. It only makes sense. Also, most areas of the country are still reeling from the downturn in the economy and people are looking to get out from under the expense of a horse. A good horse is a good horse whether you buy him from a gaited farm, or an individual owner. What is most important is that you have someone near you who knows what they are doing and is willing to help you if you run into problems.

Take your time. There are a lot of gaits out there and a lot of horses.
Good luck!

Couldn't agree with you more..except of the price <g>. I'm surrounded by gaited horses, paso fino's being the most common. Their prices vary and tend to run to the least expensive for a nice trail mount, though trying to find one that hasn't been harshly trained is difficult. Tw's and ssh are all over, mostly starting out at the least of $1800 and range up towards 10k..and these are TRAIL horses (where's the eyeroll emoticon??) There aren't as many tw farms here...one large show barn around the corner that spits out the x-show horse can calls it "trail ready" and isn't for the newbie at all. Finding a good, solid, sound dependable trail horse isn't as easy as it probably once was. People are desperate to sell and will tell you anything you want to hear..at least in this neck of the woods. Newbie gaited riders are told a bunch of bull just to make a sale..sad.
HagonNag likes this.
     
    06-04-2012, 07:10 PM
  #63
Foal
I'm not looking forward to making the decision but I may be letting my go about this time next year. Our family activity has turned into just my activity, going to be a difficult decision that's for sure.
     
    06-04-2012, 08:00 PM
  #64
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Horse    
Couldn't agree with you more..except of the price <g>.one large show barn around the corner that spits out the x-show horse can calls it "trail ready" and isn't for the newbie at all. Finding a good, solid, sound dependable trail horse isn't as easy as it probably once was. People are desperate to sell and will tell you anything you want to hear..at least in this neck of the woods. Newbie gaited riders are told a bunch of bull just to make a sale..sad.
Thank you. I think what you are saying has always been true with people who have no scruples. Horse trader is usually a derogatory term mainly because so often, people selling horses have had no scruples. In times of economic hardship, it only gets worse. Good, solid trail horses are worth a lot more than most newbies realize or are willing to pay. And they don't grow on trees. Add "gaited" to the mix and they become rarer and give people another reason to raise the price! People who are new to gaited horses really need to take the time to educate themselves and find a trustworthy advisor before they buy.

Dark horse, Do you suppose there are so many Pasos in Florida because of the large Cuban and Hispanic population? Here in Upstate SC, we dont' see so many, but this is a BIG trailriding area and there are a lot of gaited horses...mainly TWH's, SSHs, and MFTs.
     
    06-04-2012, 08:04 PM
  #65
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patriot    
I'm not looking forward to making the decision but I may be letting my go about this time next year. Our family activity has turned into just my activity, going to be a difficult decision that's for sure.
Patriot, I'm sorry to hear that. I think if I were to stop riding, I'd be a horse widow, just like some women are golf widows. I'm sure my husband would find someone to ride with him while I waited at home. I can't imagine him without a horse.
     
    06-05-2012, 10:12 AM
  #66
Foal
HagonNag..I do think it's because of the large Hispanic and/or Latino population. I'm not saying that all of them are harsh in their training or that any and all of the American trainers are buttercups in their methods, either.

Usually there are alot of babies that hit the ground in the paso world each year looking for that fino gait that will bring BIG money if they do well. It's nothing to enter a class at a show with the horse being worth 100k, the horse wins the class (usually this happens in fino) and is immediately sold for 125k or more. Shown again and sold again. There are pasos in my area that sell for over a million dollars...it's crazy. These horses are competing at around 3yrs old...so, there are a lot of them that don't make the cut, much like tb's and are then sold for trail.

Most people these days with disposable income and want a horse are a bit older. Of course this isn't an absolute..just in general..and they don't want to trot. The paso being one of the smoothest rides out there and here they're not much money (some are give aways) people will gravitate towards them. IMHO, they are not for a new horse owner or for the timid rider. They aren't crazy, spastic, mean or out of their mind like a lot of people think. Most have had the harsh training and then fall into hands that don't understand them and it makes matters worse. They're probably, at least to me, THE smartest horses out there. IF there is a hole in your riding they WILL find it. Almost immediately, LOL. And they take huge pleasure in exploiting it, just for fun. Hence, my opinion that they need a confident rider. Once a relationship is established, they are Amazing and will lay down and die for their owner.

Wow, did I ramble or what?? Sorry!!

I would suggest anyone looking into gaited breeds to do their homework ad nauseum. A paso will pace as well and they will trot if not asked to gait correctly, though they are more naturally gaited than the tw's, ssh's, kmh's, etc. A couple years ago I looked at a kmh 4yr old gelding, just for kicks. Asking price was either 9 or 10k, beautiful unusual color. I was shocked that this young horse, who they said was wonderful on the trails, didn't even have the basics of steering or whoa on him <sigh>.
     
    06-05-2012, 06:16 PM
  #67
Yearling
DarkHorse, Thank you for confirming my opinion of Paso's. I've not had a lot of experience with them, and generally I felt that they had more brio than I wanted to deal with. I know they are smooth....but they can be a handful.

At almost 65, I'm through with dealing with challenges. It can be fun and I've enjoyed convincing my racking horse that I am smarter than he is, but I have no desire to start over. I'll leave the challenges for the younger crowd.
     
    06-06-2012, 04:46 PM
  #68
Yearling
Quick bit of info: if you are willing to make a drive or pay for shipping I know where you can get a blue papered fox trotter mare for a very decent price :) The man that originally owned my horse wants to get rid of his fox trotter mares and can't up here because no one knows what they are lol so he wants them gone and they are good. I can give you his phone # if interested!
     
    06-08-2012, 03:13 AM
  #69
Foal
gaited horse

We have a Rocky and a Kentucky Mountain. We had a Rocky prior to the one we have now and they were both great trail horses. Dependable, level headed, really seemed to enjoy being out on the trail. The Kentucky Mountain has primarily Tennessee Walker in his background with a couple Rockies in there and he tends to be more spirited. Don't know if it's due to the TW. You're going to pay a decent price for a Rocky but when you get a good one you will enjoy their temperament and gait. We bought the Rocky we have now from Van Bert Farm in Kentucky. They seem to train their horses for show more than trail. He was fast and a little head strong when we got him but when he realized what we wanted (after going to some clinics and working with him) he turned into probably the best horse we have ever owned. I've said in other posts to research gaits online so you know what you are looking at when you go to buy. Horse sellers will tell you all day it's doing a running walk, rack, etc. and it's pacing which is not desirable. It can get frustrating looking for a good gaited horse. If you know how or have access to someone who breaks horses check out Red Pond Farm in Kentucky. I had considered buying a young Rocky Mountain horse from her. She has great bloodlines and fair prices on weanling to 3 year olds.
Be patient and know what you want when you start your search.
     

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