I'm ready to get my Mountain Horse
 
 

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I'm ready to get my Mountain Horse

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    06-16-2010, 07:19 PM
  #1
Foal
I'm ready to get my Mountain Horse

I have done a lot of reading and research. Have read all the postings and now I would love to learn your recommendations on next steps to take to purchase the right mountain horse for me.
     
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    06-16-2010, 07:25 PM
  #2
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by westerngirl    
I have done a lot of reading and research. Have read all the postings and now I would love to learn your recommendations on next steps to take to purchase the right mountain horse for me.
Hey - in addition to trail riding, do you want to do other activities with your horse?
     
    06-16-2010, 07:30 PM
  #3
Foal
Yes - I would love to do some shows possibly at the equine shows therefore I would love to get a horse with some experience at both show and trail.
     
    06-16-2010, 08:03 PM
  #4
Foal
You picked a good breed to do both - they are calm breed therefore you can ride a spirited horse (which is flashy for show) without the nervousness that may be difficult on a mountain trail.

I can tell you what we did which enabled us to learn quickly and also was a lot of fun.
  1. We started by checking out the Mountain Horse farms in our area. In Oregon I would recommend Triple S Mountain Horse Ranch, Rocky Mountain Gaited Horses, Eagle Point, Oregon and in Kentucky, Morgan Ranch. We met Paula & Bert in Kentucky but know they have a beautifuly facility in Oregon.
  2. Then we booked a trip to the heart of Mountain Horse country - Kentucky. This is a treat that you can't miss.
  3. We started in Stanton, KY which is a good central location to visit a number of farms including one of the largest Moutain horse farms Van Bert Rocky Mountain Horses, Kentucky Mountain Horses, Trail Horses for Sale - which is a multiple generation family run farm who are very generous with their knowledge of the horse, riding and showing. Visiting Vanbert farms is an event all by itself. If you are lucky there will be a opening at their horse cottage to stay which overlooks pastures full of mares, weanlings and Stallions. The Kentucky natural state park is a quick drive and something to not be missed.
  4. If you go in the summer, you can also attend a horse show - check out United Mountain Horse, Inc / American Gaited Mountain Horse LLC web site for show schedule.
  5. Take this opportunity to talk to people and ride the variety of mountain horses.
  6. Since you have some interest in showing, you need to get a registered horse - there are a few registries therefore ask questions if you are not familar. The united mountain horse web site gives lots of information (link above) if you are confused.
  7. Look for a horse with experience in show and/or after you purchase ask for your horse to get some show experience before you bring him home (ideally you can get the experience along with your horse).
  8. Ride as many different horses as you can and enjoy!
If you are in the Seattle area, give me a shout - we don't have horses for sale but always up to showing off our horses and going you for a ride.
     
    06-17-2010, 11:37 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by RockNRoll    
You picked a good breed to do both - they are calm breed therefore you can ride a spirited horse (which is flashy for show) without the nervousness that may be difficult on a mountain trail.


I can tell you what we did which enabled us to learn quickly and also was a lot of fun.
  1. We started by checking out the Mountain Horse farms in our area. In Oregon I would recommend Triple S Mountain Horse Ranch, Rocky Mountain Gaited Horses, Eagle Point, Oregon and in Kentucky, Morgan Ranch. We met Paula & Bert in Kentucky but know they have a beautifuly facility in Oregon.
  2. Then we booked a trip to the heart of Mountain Horse country - Kentucky. This is a treat that you can't miss.
  3. We started in Stanton, KY which is a good central location to visit a number of farms including one of the largest Moutain horse farms Van Bert Rocky Mountain Horses, Kentucky Mountain Horses, Trail Horses for Sale - which is a multiple generation family run farm who are very generous with their knowledge of the horse, riding and showing. Visiting Vanbert farms is an event all by itself. If you are lucky there will be a opening at their horse cottage to stay which overlooks pastures full of mares, weanlings and Stallions. The Kentucky natural state park is a quick drive and something to not be missed.
  4. If you go in the summer, you can also attend a horse show - check out United Mountain Horse, Inc / American Gaited Mountain Horse LLC web site for show schedule.
  5. Take this opportunity to talk to people and ride the variety of mountain horses.
  6. Since you have some interest in showing, you need to get a registered horse - there are a few registries therefore ask questions if you are not familar. The united mountain horse web site gives lots of information (link above) if you are confused.
  7. Look for a horse with experience in show and/or after you purchase ask for your horse to get some show experience before you bring him home (ideally you can get the experience along with your horse).
  8. Ride as many different horses as you can and enjoy!
If you are in the Seattle area, give me a shout - we don't have horses for sale but always up to showing off our horses and going you for a ride.
Appreciate the ideas - it sounds like a lot of fun - I checked on flights and they are pretty cheap so we just might go on an adventure and we would love to take you up on offer to visit your horses.
     
    06-18-2010, 05:59 PM
  #6
Yearling
Completely agree about the above. Decide exactly what you want and go try out as many as you can, get to know what kind of movement you want. Fast and flashy, slower and smoother, there is still a lot of variety in the type of mover you can get. Oh, and don't pass up some of the smaller farms you find, I know IME sometimes they have extremely nice horses. I bought my boy from a lady with less than 20 horses and he's unbelievable(all bias aside,lol). At 4 months old he beat a 2 year old stallion in the championship round at a KMSH show, he's never gotten lower than a 2nd in halter. We're just getting started showing under saddle.
     
    06-20-2010, 11:35 PM
  #7
Weanling
Personally I would stay away from UMH shows...i don't like them very well, lots of sketchy judgeing, and the horses that win, 9 times out of 10 win b/c of who the owner, rider, or barn showing is...

I feel like better horses can be purchased from smaller farms... I.e. 40-50 horses or less...one of the farms mentioned breeds more mares then that per year...and usually the foals that don't cost an arm and a leg are not imo good representations of our breed.

Good luck with your search, you CAN NOT go wrong with Mountain Horses!!!

Nate
     
    06-26-2010, 12:50 PM
  #8
Foal
Not our experience and a number of barns on the west coast trailer their horses all the way out each summer to be in the UMH shows which, we feel are very well judged, and lots of fun. Nice touches that make you welcome. They are doing a good job of uniting the various mountain horse groups.
     
    06-26-2010, 01:24 PM
  #9
Weanling
Well that's your experience and im glad you enjoyed them but I watched a mare park pleasure class where the winning horse broke gait twice and the 2nd place mare not only broke gait 3 times but fell to her knees, but placed b/c of who was on them...thats just my experience...
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    06-26-2010, 03:55 PM
  #10
Foal
Thanks for the great advice. I spent some time last week visiting local farms (smaller ones) - lots of fun. I think it would help to actually ride and see examples of the various gaits so I am heading for some of the bigger barns that have a larger variety under saddle but won't neglect smaller farms - actually VanBertFarms (a big breeding farm) was very helpful - they sent me videos and helped me locate a number of small barns in my area - very positive and refreshing. It may be time consuming but I figure that it is a long term investment therefore worth it.
     

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