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The most versatile gaited breed

This is a discussion on The most versatile gaited breed within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Can lippitt morgans be naturally gaited
  • Are gaited horses versayile?

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    04-28-2012, 12:19 AM
  #21
Yearling
It is ok, times change. I have been sad this week because of loosing my Baby...he was a magnificent draft cross, alas poor joints.

Yes, spotted Arabs, wizzing by...the handler assured me the little fireballs (my words, not his!) were 95.9% pure Arabian, and in the regular registry...I did not ask him to do the calculations for me...

The Park Morgans in my family did not have any funny shoes or messed up feet. They were stout and proud but did have higher knee action, but nothing like seen today, it was a long time ago.

Mine was a Lippitt Morgan, I broke her to drive before riding, very surefooted and kind.

In my experience the Morgan horse was very much a 1 person animal, would tolerate other people, but really bonds to their owner.

Ah, the grade horse, yeah, they are all "breeds" now. I try to stay to the traditional, but they are harder to come by anymore. This is why I went to Kentucky to get my RM, he was from a very traditional breeder. Unfortunately the traditional horses are not what wins anymore. Everything is exagerated.

Don't get me started on the variety of quarter horses..they used to be an "all around horse" now you need a different QH for each class! They go from the psuedo-draft look to 17 hand TB look-alikes. CRAZY

Anyway, we digress from the topic...what is the favorite gaited breed.

I'm still saying the TW, but I am meaning the basic traditional Walker, long comfortable stride, steps it up with a kiss, and goes all day long...
     
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    04-28-2012, 11:52 AM
  #22
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnitaAnne    
It is ok, times change. I have been sad this week because of loosing my Baby...he was a magnificent draft cross, alas poor joints.

Yes, spotted Arabs, wizzing by...the handler assured me the little fireballs (my words, not his!) were 95.9% pure Arabian, and in the regular registry...I did not ask him to do the calculations for me...

The Park Morgans in my family did not have any funny shoes or messed up feet. They were stout and proud but did have higher knee action, but nothing like seen today, it was a long time ago.

Mine was a Lippitt Morgan, I broke her to drive before riding, very surefooted and kind.

In my experience the Morgan horse was very much a 1 person animal, would tolerate other people, but really bonds to their owner.

Ah, the grade horse, yeah, they are all "breeds" now. I try to stay to the traditional, but they are harder to come by anymore. This is why I went to Kentucky to get my RM, he was from a very traditional breeder. Unfortunately the traditional horses are not what wins anymore. Everything is exagerated.

Don't get me started on the variety of quarter horses..they used to be an "all around horse" now you need a different QH for each class! They go from the psuedo-draft look to 17 hand TB look-alikes. CRAZY

Anyway, we digress from the topic...what is the favorite gaited breed.

I'm still saying the TW, but I am meaning the basic traditional Walker, long comfortable stride, steps it up with a kiss, and goes all day long...
Sorry to hear of the loss of your guy.
AnitaAnne likes this.
     
    04-28-2012, 06:22 PM
  #23
Yearling
Icelandics are the most versatile since they trot and canter as well as gait. They can jump pretty well too. I would still like to try an MFT though.
     
    04-28-2012, 08:24 PM
  #24
Yearling
Here is the link to the "natural" spotted Arabians...now to find a gaited one and we will have it all in one horse!!


http://www.arabianhorses.org/educati...r_Patterns.pdf
Lockwood likes this.
     
    05-03-2012, 11:24 PM
  #25
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnitaAnne    
The Park Morgans in my family did not have any funny shoes or messed up feet. They were stout and proud but did have higher knee action, but nothing like seen today, it was a long time ago.

Mine was a Lippitt Morgan, I broke her to drive before riding, very surefooted and kind.

In my experience the Morgan horse was very much a 1 person animal, would tolerate other people, but really bonds to their owner.

Anyway, we digress from the topic...what is the favorite gaited breed.

I'm still saying the TW, but I am meaning the basic traditional Walker, long comfortable stride, steps it up with a kiss, and goes all day long...
I just finished watching a special on tv about the Lippitt Morgan.
Wow, I forgot how much I had forgotten about Morgans since I owned mine when I was younger. (About *bleep* years ago.)
This was the style my mare was and the type of Morgan I have always liked.
But the Morgan breeders and show people in my area were doing the park style (as they called them) and they were almost indecernable from Saddlebreds. At least in my area, and is where my hoof comment came from. The hooves on those Morgans where the same as I saw in Saddlebred show stables back then and what I have seen recently.
I always (personally) thought it was a shame to shape and outcross Morgans into something it was not and with almost no connection to Figure, the foundation stallion.
Glad to see the Lippitt line, although rare, is still around.

So, getting back to the OP, if the gaited Morgan is anything like the Lippett Morgan I'm putting them at the top of my list now, above MFT. (Sorry MFT folks)
     
    05-04-2012, 07:34 AM
  #26
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lockwood    
I just finished watching a special on tv about the Lippitt Morgan.
Wow, I forgot how much I had forgotten about Morgans since I owned mine when I was younger. (About *bleep* years ago.)
This was the style my mare was and the type of Morgan I have always liked.
But the Morgan breeders and show people in my area were doing the park style (as they called them) and they were almost indecernable from Saddlebreds. At least in my area, and is where my hoof comment came from. The hooves on those Morgans where the same as I saw in Saddlebred show stables back then and what I have seen recently.
I always (personally) thought it was a shame to shape and outcross Morgans into something it was not and with almost no connection to Figure, the foundation stallion.
Glad to see the Lippitt line, although rare, is still around.

So, getting back to the OP, if the gaited Morgan is anything like the Lippett Morgan I'm putting them at the top of my list now, above MFT. (Sorry MFT folks)
You are *bleep* years? I go back about *bleep bleep* years ago...check out this clip


And this one - at 3:18 looks exactly like a picture of my Uncle's stud

Lockwood likes this.
     
    05-04-2012, 09:33 AM
  #27
Weanling
Define "versitile."

In Brazil the Marchador horse is used for cattle and and general ranch work; general transportation (Brazil is still a Third World country once you get away from the Big Cities); Dressage; Three Day Eventing; Enduro (a form of endurance racing); Hunting; and several other disciplines.

Like all gaited horses, the Marchador horse begins as a very good "road horse." A good "road horse" has to be able to handle the general risks and challenges found on a modern public highway as well as the traditional things like ditches, fallen logs, highwaymen, etc. It does these things quite well.

So, yes, I'd say it's tops in the "versitile" category.

G.
Wallee likes this.
     
    05-04-2012, 02:04 PM
  #28
Green Broke
Years back I knew a gal that was breeding along the Lippett lines-I loved her horses-they were so sensible & sturdy. I've been hearing about the gaited Morgans for awhile now, but haven't seen one in person, but I can imagine they are not cheap, especially if coupled with a "color" like buckskin or palomino. Curlies also have a gaited line & I think there is a breeder of them in Texas. The gaited horse I have now is a Paso Fino,she does all gaits & loves to jump also.
AnitaAnne and Lockwood like this.
     
    05-04-2012, 03:34 PM
  #29
Yearling
Well, I was only listing what I thought was the best gaited American horse breed. So I will change to a Morgan Horse, like Lockwood, because they are the oldest and most "versatile or versitile" horse, doing all that the Brazil horse does plus looking beautiful

#1 - Morgan
#2 - TW
#3 - RMHA*

*this breed may move up if my Rocky works out like I hope he does!
     
    05-13-2012, 11:05 PM
  #30
Weanling
I would say a Saddlebred. My heart belongs to TWH's, but most versatile I would have to say is a Saddlebred. They are not always naturally gaited, and 5 gaiters often have to be taught the extras. But they are AMAZING athetes. They are increasingly popular in Cross Country competition as well as Endurance races. Their long backs and funky leg conformation can leave them incredibly smooth. I find they can also be overly sensitive in their feet like Andalusians, which leaves them agile, floaty, and sure footed (or very trippy and clumsy if you use heavy shoes lol).
     

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