Movement help, please!
 
 

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Movement help, please!

This is a discussion on Movement help, please! within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Kinda lame at trot, lame at canter
  • Gaited horse lame

 
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    06-12-2012, 03:36 PM
  #1
Yearling
Movement help, please!

I wrote a previous thread about the twh in question, but I am looking for some ideas to try and smooth his gaits out, and help him to keep in them easier. When he canters, he looks [and feels] very much like scooby doo running from a scary thing. The boy is very chaotic when going at anything other than a walk. He listens amazingly well to leg, but at the end of the arena where the other riders sometimes sit and chit chat, or get instruction, he always wants to run to his buddies and trying to get him to stop, turn or listen to leg is a hassle.

For example: our arena [it's outdoor] had water due to the rain. We were working on getting him to walk through them. Eventually he did so, and didn't seem much bothered any more. Well. We tried to weave, and as we weaved back down to the end, he would gain speed and at the last stansion to weave through, he'd side step out of the way [there is a shallow puddle next to it which adds to his behavior] and continue forth. If there was another rider workig on something else, and I tried to turn him out of the way, he'd still side step and get his rear dangerously close to the other horses. He is pretty low in the totum pole for our heard, so the only one who tolerates him is our mix, Shooter who stays directly in the pasture with him.

I want to work on trying to collect him, but I am wondering if due to his limp [old injury from before we got him, he is sound to ride] that it won't be possible. It makes him very uncomfortable to ride at anything more than a running walk/trot or a walk.

I plan on taking him out alone in the future so as to work on things safely, and maybe work on his slight buddy sourness.

Here is the thread I spoke of earlier.
Nervous Rescue TWH
     
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    06-13-2012, 11:46 AM
  #2
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deschutes    
I wrote a previous thread about the twh in question, but I am looking for some ideas to try and smooth his gaits out, and help him to keep in them easier. When he canters, he looks [and feels] very much like scooby doo running from a scary thing. The boy is very chaotic when going at anything other than a walk. He listens amazingly well to leg, but at the end of the arena where the other riders sometimes sit and chit chat, or get instruction, he always wants to run to his buddies and trying to get him to stop, turn or listen to leg is a hassle.

For example: our arena [it's outdoor] had water due to the rain. We were working on getting him to walk through them. Eventually he did so, and didn't seem much bothered any more. Well. We tried to weave, and as we weaved back down to the end, he would gain speed and at the last stansion to weave through, he'd side step out of the way [there is a shallow puddle next to it which adds to his behavior] and continue forth. If there was another rider workig on something else, and I tried to turn him out of the way, he'd still side step and get his rear dangerously close to the other horses. He is pretty low in the totum pole for our heard, so the only one who tolerates him is our mix, Shooter who stays directly in the pasture with him.

I want to work on trying to collect him, but I am wondering if due to his limp [old injury from before we got him, he is sound to ride] that it won't be possible. It makes him very uncomfortable to ride at anything more than a running walk/trot or a walk.

I plan on taking him out alone in the future so as to work on things safely, and maybe work on his slight buddy sourness.

Here is the thread I spoke of earlier.
Nervous Rescue TWH
A horse with a Grade 1-2 lameness will often show sound at the walk, sound most of the time at the intermediate gait, and clearly lame at the canter. This does not mean they're not lame, only that it's not showing because the athletic demand is very small.

I've got an aged gelding who does just fine at the walk and gait, but it's "Mr. Toad's Wild Ride" if you try and put him into the canter. His hocks are in poor condition (arthritic degeneration). There's really nothing to be done for them and we let him give lessons to new kids (and small adults) where only the walk will be used.

A very lateral horse will often have difficulty with the canter, as that is a three beat gait. Some breeds are trained to never canter (Pacing Standarbreds are an example) because in a harness race a horse that "breaks gait" is disqualified. Some self-proclaimed "gaited horse experts" will tell you that you should never allow a gaited horse to canter, anyway. Some agree partially, saying you should "set the gait" before canter work. Personally, I consider both views erronious, but there is lots of opinion to the contrary.

If the horse has an old injury it might well mean that the canter will be beyond them. Only a vet. Can do the kind of lameness eval. That could answer this question definiatively.

G.
     
    06-15-2012, 06:03 PM
  #3
Yearling
I took him out, and I tried something with him during practice.
When I asked for the canter myself, he had trouble picking it up, and fumbled. However, if he broke into one himself, he moved better and much more smoothly in a couple laps around the arena. The limp shows itself while walking/running walking/trotting whichever, but not so much in a canter.
     
    06-17-2012, 06:18 PM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deschutes    
I took him out, and I tried something with him during practice.
When I asked for the canter myself, he had trouble picking it up, and fumbled. However, if he broke into one himself, he moved better and much more smoothly in a couple laps around the arena. The limp shows itself while walking/running walking/trotting whichever, but not so much in a canter.
If he is lame at the walk/rw/trot or any other movement, he's not going to be smooth. Hopefully you've got vet clearance to ride him so as not to make his injury worse (said with respect and no snottiness.)
     

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