My very first horse. - Page 2
 
 

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My very first horse.

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        07-02-2009, 12:49 AM
      #11
    Banned
    That mare has the worst put together top line I have seen in a long time. Very straight in the front with what appears to be roached going into a very badly goose rumped haunch.

    And she may have worms but she is also pregnant and a shame for she is not breed worthy nor is the stud worthy of keeping his "stuff" either. The foal will not have a good start.
         
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        07-02-2009, 01:04 AM
      #12
    Showing
    I don't want to sound negative from the get go as well but the impression I have gotten from the posts you've posted so far has got me concerned. Conditioning them back into proper health and getting dental, hoof work and deworming done shouldn't be to hard but what concerns me the most is the stud.

    Do you actually understand proper care behind owning a stallion? Are you planning to geld him as soon as you get him if he is indeed a stallion?

    Stallions are a totally different "breed" of horse. Their needs and what they require for special care is completely different of that of a mare or gelding. Not sure that the man who owned them before you, understood basic horse care either.

    Never should you ever put a young stuff in a field with other mares, ever. I'll also mention that by looking at the photos you provided, that that mare you are getting looks like she might be in foal. Are you ready to care for a third horse?

    I think it's great that you went right for 2 rescues, God bless your souls, but without trying to sound rude, your basic horse knowledge might end up doing more harm to these 2 horses than good. If you can take them back and get your money back, I strongly suggest doing so.

    There are horses out there looking for free homes that will make much better first time horses than the trouble you are getting yourself into by taking those 2.
         
        07-02-2009, 01:11 AM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by My2Geldings    
    I don't want to sound negative from the get go as well but the impression I have gotten from the posts you've posted so far has got me concerned. Conditioning them back into proper health and getting dental, hoof work and deworming done shouldn't be to hard but what concerns me the most is the stud.

    Do you actually understand proper care behind owning a stallion? Are you planning to geld him as soon as you get him if he is indeed a stallion?

    Stallions are a totally different "breed" of horse. Their needs and what they require for special care is completely different of that of a mare or gelding. Not sure that the man who owned them before you, understood basic horse care either.

    Never should you ever put a young stuff in a field with other mares, ever. I'll also mention that by looking at the photos you provided, that that mare you are getting looks like she might be in foal. Are you ready to care for a third horse?

    I think it's great that you went right for 2 rescues, God bless your souls, but without trying to sound rude, your basic horse knowledge might end up doing more harm to these 2 horses than good. If you can take them back and get your money back, I strongly suggest doing so.

    There are horses out there looking for free homes that will make much better first time horses than the trouble you are getting yourself into by taking those 2.
    Of course I plan on getting him gelded. I've worked with stallions before and I know how they are. I understand you're not trying to be rude.

    And if she is in foal, hopefully not, but if she is than yes I am willing and ready to take care of it.
    I am going to take responsibility for what I have gotten myself into, no matter how hard the work. Just because it might be a handful, and they might not be the prettiest horses doesn't mean I get rid of them. Since when did owning a horse become a beauty contest?
         
        07-02-2009, 01:28 AM
      #14
    Weanling
    First! FRESH, CLEAN WATER, ALL DAY, EVERY DAY!

    Ok, don't fret, dear, at all the seemingly harsh comments. My first horse ever was a rescue, about in the same shape as your young male. Find out if he still is a stallion or has been neutered, and if not, that's the first thing you need to do. It will help him regulate himself and gain the weight as opposed to run the weight off looking for mares.

    Just a suggestion, to get started, worm them each for 100lbs over their weight. Use either Equimax or Zimecterin Gold, which you can find at Orschelns or Tractor Supply. They are the more expensive of the wormers, but they are the best for first-time wormings. In 7 days, give the same dosage of pyrantel pamoate, or ivermectin. 21 days after the PP or Ivermec, give the same dosage of whichever those two you didn't use the first time. Keep them on that rotation, worming once every three months.

    Ill horses should be treated slowly, and once you get them home you CANNOT just dump feed to them. This can cause colic or other serious digestive problems. Considering the horses conditions, they will need a gradual ration. They obviously haven't been fed very well, and the enzymes in their stomachs aren't conditioned to digest so many different things at once, so throwing them out to green, grassy pasture will do them no good. Make sure they have hay ALL DAY to eat at will. This will get their stomachs on their way to normalcy.

    Start with a plain prairie hay, or prairie/brome. Timothy, clover, and alfalfa are higher protein, and these horses bodies cannot handle that stuff at the moment, nor do they need it.

    Here's how I tend to start mine off:

    I feed Platform feeds, by the way.

    In a huge bin, probably 40 or 50 gal tupperware tub (with a lid! Keep that stuff covered to prevent rodents and flies from contaminating it), I mix:

    One 50lb bag of senior pellets,
    One 50lb bag of mare/foal feed,
    One 5gal bucket of Omegatin pellets (a fat supplement).

    I mix these up really really well, and start with half a coffee can once a day for the first week. The second week, give half a coffee can twice a day. Week three and four, 3/4 coffee can twice a day, week 5 you're in the clear to provide a full coffee can twice a day.

    On week 5, for your little stud, I would get a small tub of "GrowColt" supplement, and add one little scoop once a day in the feed. (provided in the bucket for you) Week 6, one scoop twice a day in the feed.



    This will take a LOOOOOOONG time, I bought my only mare last June at 658lbs. We weighed her again June this year, and she is only up to 890. She's not as big as she needs to be, but is doing very well, as you can see from the pictures on my profile.

    And ladies that are afraid the mare is pregnant, there's no way to tell by looking, the vet will have to check. Looking at my mare you'd assume so too, but she's just potbellied, and hasn't even come in heat yet this year...

    If you have any other questions for me, feel free to PM me!

    Good luck with your babies!
         
        07-02-2009, 01:30 AM
      #15
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mcfrumple    
    Of course I plan on getting him gelded. I've worked with stallions before and I know how they are. I understand you're not trying to be rude.

    And if she is in foal, hopefully not, but if she is than yes I am willing and ready to take care of it.
    I am going to take responsibility for what I have gotten myself into, no matter how hard the work. Just because it might be a handful, and they might not be the prettiest horses doesn't mean I get rid of them. Since when did owning a horse become a beauty contest?
    I am so very glad you plan to geld your boy. My concern about a pregnancy has nothing to do with your mare or your stud's beauty. It's just that her conformation suggests to me that she won't stay sound and may end up in pain before long. I wouldn't wish to pass that on to a youngster.

    The stud...was he fed well as a baby? How old is he? For some reason he has the appearance, to me, of a horse with stunted growth.
         
        07-02-2009, 01:32 AM
      #16
    Green Broke
    Please everyone lets keep this simple and to the point, and not TRY to be harsh, although it's ok to speak the truth. Please remember to keep it friendly.
         
        07-02-2009, 01:35 AM
      #17
    Weanling
    Oh, and if she is in foal, God willing, it may not be that little stud's offspring anyway...
         
        07-02-2009, 01:39 AM
      #18
    Started
    I think it's great your trying to help them!. I do suggest to get him gelded on friday when the vet comes, it's a quick simple, fast procedure. Although both of them don't look breeding worthy I bet they would clean up nice to be a riding horse. I really suggest to get those two separated until then. If he's old enough to breed then he will be all over her. If he hasn't tried to mount her and she didn't threaten him away, then there are only two reasons that a mare would reject a stallion and that is, if she isn't in heat, or if she's already pregnant. That belly does look a little too bloated to be just worms.

    I really hope she isn't pregnant though just because you already have your hands full, I'm sure you will make a great owner.

    I wish the best of luck, keep us updated.
         
        07-02-2009, 01:45 AM
      #19
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by westonsma    
    First! FRESH, CLEAN WATER, ALL DAY, EVERY DAY!

    Ok, don't fret, dear, at all the seemingly harsh comments. My first horse ever was a rescue, about in the same shape as your young male. Find out if he still is a stallion or has been neutered, and if not, that's the first thing you need to do. It will help him regulate himself and gain the weight as opposed to run the weight off looking for mares.

    Just a suggestion, to get started, worm them each for 100lbs over their weight. Use either Equimax or Zimecterin Gold, which you can find at Orschelns or Tractor Supply. They are the more expensive of the wormers, but they are the best for first-time wormings. In 7 days, give the same dosage of pyrantel pamoate, or ivermectin. 21 days after the PP or Ivermec, give the same dosage of whichever those two you didn't use the first time. Keep them on that rotation, worming once every three months.

    Ill horses should be treated slowly, and once you get them home you CANNOT just dump feed to them. This can cause colic or other serious digestive problems. Considering the horses conditions, they will need a gradual ration. They obviously haven't been fed very well, and the enzymes in their stomachs aren't conditioned to digest so many different things at once, so throwing them out to green, grassy pasture will do them no good. Make sure they have hay ALL DAY to eat at will. This will get their stomachs on their way to normalcy.

    Start with a plain prairie hay, or prairie/brome. Timothy, clover, and alfalfa are higher protein, and these horses bodies cannot handle that stuff at the moment, nor do they need it.

    Here's how I tend to start mine off:

    I feed Platform feeds, by the way.

    In a huge bin, probably 40 or 50 gal tupperware tub (with a lid! Keep that stuff covered to prevent rodents and flies from contaminating it), I mix:

    One 50lb bag of senior pellets,
    One 50lb bag of mare/foal feed,
    One 5gal bucket of Omegatin pellets (a fat supplement).

    I mix these up really really well, and start with half a coffee can once a day for the first week. The second week, give half a coffee can twice a day. Week three and four, 3/4 coffee can twice a day, week 5 you're in the clear to provide a full coffee can twice a day.

    On week 5, for your little stud, I would get a small tub of "GrowColt" supplement, and add one little scoop once a day in the feed. (provided in the bucket for you) Week 6, one scoop twice a day in the feed.



    This will take a LOOOOOOONG time, I bought my only mare last June at 658lbs. We weighed her again June this year, and she is only up to 890. She's not as big as she needs to be, but is doing very well, as you can see from the pictures on my profile.

    And ladies that are afraid the mare is pregnant, there's no way to tell by looking, the vet will have to check. Looking at my mare you'd assume so too, but she's just potbellied, and hasn't even come in heat yet this year...

    If you have any other questions for me, feel free to PM me!

    Good luck with your babies!


    Thank you so much for your help and kindness! I reeeally appreciate it. :]
    I don't understand why people started thrashing me and my horses. Maybe they are trying to warn me I suppose but like I said, I have faith in these little guys and I'm going to be a responsible horse owner and give them love and the best care that I can. I am getting the little guy gelded if he's not already and they are getting wormed asap.

    I'm sure I will PM with any other questions I have.

    Rescuing them makes me feel so good. I'm not going to get rid of them just because they need some work, or they're pregnant, or because they aren't the prettiest. I think once they both get weight on them they will be beautiful. I didn't buy them for looks, I bought them because of the special connection I felt with both of them, they have such a gentle kind soul and soft eyes. There were plenty of opportunity for me to buy a healthy bomb proof horse, but no connection.


    Again, thank you for such a kind and helpful response. :]
         
        07-02-2009, 01:48 AM
      #20
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Equestriun    
    I think it's great your trying to help them!. I do suggest to get him gelded on friday when the vet comes, it's a quick simple, fast procedure. Although both of them don't look breeding worthy I bet they would clean up nice to be a riding horse. I really suggest to get those two separated until then. If he's old enough to breed then he will be all over her. If he hasn't tried to mount her and she didn't threaten him away, then there are only two reasons that a mare would reject a stallion and that is, if she isn't in heat, or if she's already pregnant. That belly does look a little too bloated to be just worms.

    I really hope she isn't pregnant though just because you already have your hands full, I'm sure you will make a great owner.

    I wish the best of luck, keep us updated.


    Thank you. I definitely will update Friday when I find out everything. :]
         

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