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Naturally gaited horse

This is a discussion on Naturally gaited horse within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Is a horse born gaited
  • What is a gaited horse mean

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    03-08-2012, 11:45 AM
  #11
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newby32    
What does it mean when someone says that the horse is "naturally gaited". I thought that a horse was either gaited or it wasn't. Can you train a horse to gait or are they born that way?

I know there are many gaited breeds, but could you breed a MFT and a quarter horse and have them produce a gaited foal? Or is it very dependent on confirmation?

Sorry about so many questions. It's just so intriguing to me! :)
To say a horse is naturally gaited means it is born gaited, it can do the gaits from birth without any assistance or training. An unnaturally gaited horse is a horse that will only gait by the use of soaring or man made devices.

As for a MFT and a QH, they could produce a gaited foal, they could produce a non-gaited foal, it does partially have to do with conformation because it is partially how the horses are built that allow them to gait.
     
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    03-09-2012, 11:51 AM
  #12
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newby32    
What does it mean when someone says that the horse is "naturally gaited". I thought that a horse was either gaited or it wasn't. Can you train a horse to gait or are they born that way?

I know there are many gaited breeds, but could you breed a MFT and a quarter horse and have them produce a gaited foal? Or is it very dependent on confirmation?

Sorry about so many questions. It's just so intriguing to me! :)
Depending on the context of the conversation, the phrase "naturally gaited" could also mean that the horse is a purebred from a gaited breed and does not have any special shoeing, pads, or other devices in order to create a more flashy, high-stepping movement.
     
    03-09-2012, 01:42 PM
  #13
Foal
My horse gaits really well. He does have a sort of hard trot in between his running walk and his canter. It's like I have to slow him down a notch to get back to the gait or speed him up.
He does seem to have a fast walk and then a running walk. Next comes the hard trot and finally the canter. It's interesting because his running walk covers A LOT of ground very quickly, but his canter is pretty slow. Sometimes, he doesn't keep up well with the other horses at a canter, yet is miles ahead at the "walk".
     
    03-09-2012, 02:27 PM
  #14
Green Broke
I've had a lot of gaited horses & some cross breds-they all gaited plus some had the regualr gaits,too. Really made it fun & interesting. Let my riding partner try out my Paso Fino last week-she was amazed,said it was like having a horse w/automatic transmission,so smooth & loved the speed. She was also happy her horse didn't try to buck me off-as she doesn't like other riders, & will usually buck a bit. We were 1/2 way through our ride though so neither one was fresh. I like having at least 1 gaited horse at all times & preferably a small one. Happy Gaiting!
     
    03-09-2012, 02:36 PM
  #15
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darrin    
In a nutshell, no and that goes for all gaited horses. The truth is it's easier to trot or pace then it is to gait for most. For the naturally gaited horse it is reversed, gaiting for them is easier then trotting or pacing. FYI, TWH gait is a cross between a trot and pace and why I'm using that as an example. For those not naturally gaited it takes a proper collection and being muscled up to gait properly as it is work for them.

As an exercise, pick the breed you are interested in and learn what their gait looks like. Now go watch them in a pasture environment. Naturally gaited horses will be out in the pasture screwing around in gait all the time. Non naturally gaited horses will be passing in and out of gait as they move around. Under saddle both will be gaiting all the time assuming their training is completed.

What I didn't say before, not all horses of a gaited breed can gait. In rare instances you get one that just can't do it, call them a genetic throwback. In the same vein, a non-gaited breed can actually throw out a horse that has some sort of gait in it. The trick is being able to recognize that gait and working with the horse to bring it out.

To add to this, a naturally gaited TWH will do a flat walk in the pasture absolutely and no other gait, if you go looking at TWH and the horse you're looking at doesn't flat walk consistently the entire time that it is at a walk -turn around and leave as it will be a lot of work or it wont work.

There is a degree in any TWH where muscling is a factor for the speed they are able to do and hold the gait, no different that a person at the gym on a treadmill...there is a proper form for running and when a person runs too fast for their ability they lose form and get lazy, don't pick their feet up as high etc, so they train and improve their endurace so they can run faster in form. But if you can't speed them up at all and see a faster walk then you'e not looking at a naturally gaited horse.

My mare flat walks and run walks all over the pasture -all of our horses do, as they were bred for a natural gait but many breeders use the big lick lines because they are grandeous, and prove in their classes ...but those often produce pacey horses and those lines are in so many breeding programs it is very hard not to find a horse with tendencies to some degree.
     
    03-09-2012, 02:37 PM
  #16
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newby32    
My horse gaits really well. He does have a sort of hard trot in between his running walk and his canter. It's like I have to slow him down a notch to get back to the gait or speed him up.
He does seem to have a fast walk and then a running walk. Next comes the hard trot and finally the canter. It's interesting because his running walk covers A LOT of ground very quickly, but his canter is pretty slow. Sometimes, he doesn't keep up well with the other horses at a canter, yet is miles ahead at the "walk".
This is actually very correct. In shows, the canter should be as slow, if not slower than the running walk. The rocking chair canter for a TWH is considered it's best in a ring when it is slow. That being said -it is fun when they go fast!
     
    03-09-2012, 03:31 PM
  #17
Green Broke
Easy method, ride along side a QH person that is trotting, and match their speed. If you are calmly sitting in your saddle enjoying the butterflies, and they are bouncing up and down, you are gaiting.
     
    03-09-2012, 09:14 PM
  #18
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d    
easy method, ride along side a QH person that is trotting, and match their speed. If you are calmly sitting in your saddle enjoying the butterflies, and they are bouncing up and down, you are gaiting.
That is exactly what it is like. QH people don't like riding with me, because there is too much trotting and they get uncomfortable after a while.
cowgirl928 likes this.
     
    03-10-2012, 03:08 PM
  #19
Green Broke
But, if they want to condition their horse & build up their legs,it's do-able.
     
    03-11-2012, 01:17 PM
  #20
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cacowgirl    
But, if they want to condition their horse & build up their legs,it's do-able.
Yes and it's also good for my horse practice listening skills and take it nice and easy sometimes. It's just not so much fun, but it's good to do once in a while.
     

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